• Targeting the Microbiota to Address Diet-Induced Obesity: A Time Dependent Challenge

      Clarke, Siobhan F.; Murphy, Eileen F.; O'Sullivan, Orla; Ross, R. Paul; O'Toole, Paul W.; Shanahan, Fergus; Cotter, Paul D. (PLOS, 2013-06-07)
      Links between the gut microbiota and host metabolism have provided new perspectives on obesity. We previously showed that the link between the microbiota and fat deposition is age- and time-dependent subject to microbial adaptation to diet over time. We also demonstrated reduced weight gain in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice through manipulation of the gut microbiota with vancomycin or with the bacteriocin-producing probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 (Bac+), with metabolic improvement achieved in DIO mice in receipt of vancomycin. However, two phases of weight gain were observed with effects most marked early in the intervention phase. Here, we compare the gut microbial populations at the early relative to the late stages of intervention using a high throughput sequencing-based analysis to understand the temporal relationship between the gut microbiota and obesity. This reveals several differences in microbiota composition over the intervening period. Vancomycin dramatically altered the gut microbiota composition, relative to controls, at the early stages of intervention after which time some recovery was evident. It was also revealed that Bac+ treatment initially resulted in the presence of significantly higher proportions of Peptococcaceae and significantly lower proportions of Rikenellaceae and Porphyromonadaceae relative to the gut microbiota of L. salivarius UCC118 bacteriocin negative (Bac-) administered controls. These differences were no longer evident at the later time. The results highlight the resilience of the gut microbiota and suggest that interventions may need to be monitored and continually adjusted to ensure sustained modification of the gut microbiota.
    • Teagasc Directory of Silage Additives, 2005

      Unknown author (Teagasc, 2005-01-01)
      Products in the 2005 directory are divided into six groups; (1) Acid based; (2) sugar based; (3) enzymes; (4) enzyme/salt mixtures; (5) salts and (6) inoculants. The details on composition and application rates were supplied to Teagasc by the manufacturers/distributors and were not independently verified by Teagasc. With such a large number of products available, farmers are strongly advised to consult their Teagasc adviser before deciding on a product.
    • Teagasc Research Report 2008, Crops Research Centre, Oak Park

      Crops Research Centre, Teagasc (Teagasc, 2008-12-01)
      This report details research projects at the Teagasc Crops Research Centre in 2008.
    • Teagasc-EPA Soils and Subsoils mapping project: Final report V.1

      Fealy, Reamonn; Green, Stuart (Teagasc; Environmental Protection Agency, 2009-01-01)
      Subsoils Map: Teagasc has created the first national subsoils map to a standardised methodology; The Teagasc Subsoils map classifies the subsoils of Ireland into 16 themes, using digital stereo photogrammetry supported by field work; The subsoils map has a nominal working scale of 1:50,000; The subsoils maps for each county are now freely available to all researchers. Landcover Map: Teagasc has created the first and only national landcover map for an Irish project; The Teagasc Landcover 1995 (TLC95) map classifies the landcover of Ireland into 16 themes; It maps to a minimum size of 1 Ha; Landcover maps for each county are now freely available to all researchers. Indicative Soils Map: Teagasc has developed a national indicative soils map to a standardised methodology; The indicative soils map classifies the soils of Ireland on a categorically simplified but cartographically detailed basis into 25 classes, using an expert rule based methodology; The soils map has a nominal working scale of 1:100,000-1:150,000; The soils maps for each county are now freely available to all researchers. Habitat Indicator Map: Teagasc has created the only national habitat map for an Irish project; The Teagasc Habitat Indicator Map 1995 (THIM95) map classifies Ireland into 27 habitat themes; It maps to a minimum size of 1 Ha; Habitat maps for each county are now freely available to all researchers.
    • Technical Note: Field experiences using UV/VIS sensors for high-resolution monitoring of nitrate in groundwater

      Huebsch, Manuela; Grimmeisen, F.; Zemann, M.; Fenton, Owen; Richards, Karl G.; Jordan, P.; Sawarieh, A.; Blum, P.; Goldscheider, N. (European Geosciences Union, 2015-04-02)
      Two different in situ spectrophotometers are compared that were used in the field to determine nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations at two distinct spring discharge sites. One sensor was a double wavelength spectrophotometer (DWS) and the other a multiple wavelength spectrophotometer (MWS). The objective of the study was to review the hardware options, determine ease of calibration, accuracy, influence of additional substances and to assess positive and negative aspects of the two sensors as well as troubleshooting and trade-offs. Both sensors are sufficient to monitor highly time-resolved NO3-N concentrations in emergent groundwater. However, the chosen path length of the sensors had a significant influence on the sensitivity and the range of detectable NO3-N. The accuracy of the calculated NO3-N concentrations of the sensors can be affected if the content of additional substances such as turbidity, organic matter, nitrite or hydrogen carbonate significantly varies after the sensors have been calibrated to a particular water matrix. The MWS offers more possibilities for calibration and error detection but requires more expertise compared with the DWS.
    • Technologies for detecting PSE in pork

      Mullen, Anne Maria; McDonagh, Ciara; Troy, Declan J. (Teagasc, 2003-02)
      The ability of a single, on-line measurement to predict the quality status of an entire muscle or even of a whole carcass was investigated. Variation between pork muscles for on-line measurements of pH, conductivity and colour was evaluated. Intermuscular variation was detected at 24h p ostmortem with higher pH and conductivity values in the topside (M. s emimembranosus) than the striploin (M . longissimus thoracis et lumborum). Correlations showed that a relationship exists between the muscles (r = 0.46-0.88, p<0.05) at 45min and 3h p ostmortem. The location within the topside or the striploin at which the measurements were taken did not influence the result. Shackling did not introduce a significant variation between sides for pH, conductivity and colour values up to 24h p ostmortem, showing measurements could be taken on either side of the carcass.
    • Technologies for restricting mould growth on baled silage

      O’Kiely, Padraig; Forristal, Dermot; O’Brien, Martin; McEniry, Joseph; Laffin, Christopher; Fuller, Hubert T.; Egan, Damian; Doohan, Fiona M.; Doyle, Evelyn M.; Clipson, Nicholas J.W.; McNally, Gerard M.; Small, Christopher M.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Frisvad, Jens C. (Teagasc, 2007-12-01)
      Silage is made on approximately 86% of Irish farms, and 85% of these make some baled silage. Baled silage is particularly important as the primary silage making, storage and feeding system on many beef and smaller sized farms, but is also employed as a secondary system (often associated with facilitating grazing management during mid-summer) on many dairy and larger sized farms (O’Kiely et al., 2002). Previous surveys on farms indicated that the extent of visible fungal growth on baled silage was sometimes quite large, and could be a cause for concern. Whereas some improvements could come from applying existing knowledge and technologies, the circumstances surrounding the making and storage of baled silage suggested that environmental conditions within the bale differed from those in conventional silos, and that further knowledge was required in order to arrive at a secure set of recommendations for baled silage systems. This report deals with the final in a series (O’Kiely et al., 1999; O’Kiely et al., 2002) of three consecutive research projects investigating numerous aspect of the science and technology of baled silage. The success of each depended on extensive, integrated collaboration between the Teagasc research centres at Grange and Oak Park, and with University College Dublin. As the series progressed the multidisciplinary team needed to underpin the programme expanded, and this greatly improved the amount and detail of the research undertaken. The major objective of the project recorded in this report was to develop technologies to improve the “hygienic value” of baled silage.
    • Technologies for restricting mould growth on baled silage

      O'Kiely, Padraig; Forristal, Dermot P.; O'Brien, Martin; McEniry, Joseph; Laffin, Christopher (Teagasc, 2007-12-01)
      Silage is made on approximately 86% of Irish farms, and 85% of these make some baled silage. Baled silage is particularly important as the primary silage making, storage and feeding system on many beef and smaller sized farms, but is also employed as a secondary system (often associated with facilitating grazing management during mid-summer) on many dairy and larger sized farms (O’Kiely et al., 2002). Previous surveys on farms indicated that the extent of visible fungal growth on baled silage was sometimes quite large, and could be a cause for concern. Whereas some improvements could come from applying existing knowledge and technologies, the circumstances surrounding the making and storage of baled silage suggested that environmental conditions within the bale differed from those in conventional silos, and that further knowledge was required in order to arrive at a secure set of recommendations for baled silage systems. This report deals with the final in a series (O’Kiely et al., 1999; O’Kiely et al., 2002) of three consecutive research projects investigating numerous aspect of the science and technology of baled silage. The success of each depended on extensive, integrated collaboration between the Teagasc research centres at Grange and Oak Park, and with University College Dublin. As the series progressed the multidisciplinary team needed to underpin the programme expanded, and this greatly improved the amount and detail of the research undertaken. The major objective of the project recorded in this report was to develop technologies to improve the “hygienic value” of baled silage. Specifically, the stated aims were to: 1. Characterise the mycobiota on baled silage in Ireland 2. Enhance our understanding of the fermentation kinetics (and the unique combination of factors regulating them) peculiar to baled silage 3. Develop the capability to elucidate the mechanisms of gas entry to and exit from wrapped bales 4. Develop improved plastic and sealing methodologies 5. Identify strategies to successfully produce baled silage with a reduced content of mould and other undesirable micro-organisms.
    • Technology transfer of research results (The 2xtra project)

      McDonagh, Ciara; Byrne, Briege; Troy, Declan J.; Mullen, Anne Maria; Downey, Gerard (Teagasc, 2008-02)
      The 2XTRA project (Technology Transfer Research Results Atlantic Area) was carried out with the aim of promoting economic activity based on research results and technologies developed within universities, research and technology institutes and companies in the European Atlantic Area. This collaborative work was carried out by a strong partnership of 13 entities across this region and included universities, research and technology institutes, private consultants and TBC (technology-based company) incubators. The specific goals of the project were: ● The exchange of information and experiences on technology transfer (TT) with a view to assisting project partners directly and feeding into their regional innovation systems. ● The promotion of new technology-based companies by drawing on collective experiences and developing methodologies relating to - identification and evaluation of business ideas - production of business plans, and - support of early stage companies internationalising. ● The creation of an Atlantic Area Network to support and promote technology-based companies (TBCs) and the technology transfer process. These objectives were achieved through defined activities carried out in three separate stages of this project.
    • Temperate Grassland Yields and Nitrogen Uptake Are Influenced by Fertilizer Nitrogen Source

      Harty, Mary A.; Forrestal, Patrick J.; Carolan, Rachael; Watson, Catherine J.; Hennessy, Deirdre; Lanigan, Gary; Wall, David P.; Richards, Karl G. (American Society of Agronomy, 2017-01-25)
      In temperate grasslands, N source influences greenhouse gas emissions. Nitrification and urea hydrolysis inhibitors can reduce these losses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of N source, urease inhibitors, and nitrification inhibitors on temperate grassland yields and N uptake. Experiments were conducted at three locations over 2 years (6 site-years) on the island of Ireland, covering a range of soils and climatic conditions. Results showed that calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN), urea+N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT), urea+NBPT+dicyandiamide (DCD), and urea had equal annual dry matter yield. Urea+DCD had lower dry matter yield than CAN for 3 site-years. Calcium ammonium nitrate and urea+NBPT consistently had the same N uptake, urea+DCD had lower N uptake than CAN in 4 of 6 site-years, urea had lower N uptake than CAN in 2 site-years, and urea+NBPT+DCD had lower N uptake than CAN in 1 site-year. Urea+NBPT is a cost-effective alternative to CAN, which is consistently equal in terms of yield and N uptake in temperate grassland.
    • Temporal and spatial differences in microbial composition during the manufacture of a Continental-type cheese

      O'Sullivan, Daniel J.; Cotter, Paul D.; O'Sullivan, Orla; Giblin, Linda; McSweeney, Paul L. H.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J (American Society for Microbiology, 2015-01-30)
      We sought to determine if the time, within a production day, that a cheese is manufactured has an influence on the microbial community present within that cheese. To facilitate this, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was used to elucidate the microbial community dynamics of brine salted Continental-type cheese in cheeses produced early and late in the production day. Differences in microbial composition of the core and rind of the cheese were also investigated. Throughout ripening, it was apparent that late production day cheeses had a more diverse microbial population than their early day equivalents. Spatial variation between the cheese core and rind was also noted in that cheese rinds were found to initially have a more diverse microbial population but thereafter the opposite was the case. Interestingly, the genera Thermus, Pseudoalteromonas and Bifidobacterium, not routinely associated with a Continental-type cheese produced from pasteurised milk were detected. The significance, if any, of the presence of these genera will require further attention. Ultimately, the use of high throughput sequencing has facilitated a novel and detailed analysis of the temporal and spatial distribution of microbes in this complex cheese system and established that the period during a production cycle at which a cheese is manufactured can influence its microbial composition.
    • A temporal assessment of nematode community structure and diversity in the rhizosphere of cisgenic Phytophthora infestans-resistant potatoes

      Ortiz, Vilma; Phelan, Sinead; Mullins, Ewen (Biomed Central, 2016-12-01)
      Background Nematodes play a key role in soil processes with alterations in the nematode community structure having the potential to considerably influence ecosystem functioning. As a result fluctuations in nematode diversity and/or community structure can be gauged as a ‘barometer’ of a soil’s functional biodiversity. However, a deficit exists in regards to baseline knowledge and on the impact of specific GM crops on soil nematode populations and in particular in regard to the impact of GM potatoes on the diversity of nematode populations in the rhizosphere. The goal of this project was to begin to address this knowledge gap in regards to a GM potato line, cisgenically engineered for resistance to Phytophthora infestans (responsible organism of the Irish potato famine causing late blight disease). For this, a 3 year (2013, 2014, 2015) field experimental study was completed, containing two conventional genotypes (cvs. Desiree and Sarpo Mira) and a cisgenic genotype (cv. Desiree + Rpi-vnt1). Each potato genotype was treated with different disease management strategies (weekly chemical applications and corresponding no spray control). Hence affording the opportunity to investigate the temporal impact of potato genotype, disease management strategy (and their interaction) on the potato rhizosphere nematode community. Results Nematode structure and diversity were measured through established indices, accounts and taxonomy with factors recording a significant effect limited to the climatic conditions across the three seasons of the study and chemical applications associated with the selected disease management strategy. Based on the metrics studied, the cultivation of the cisgenic potato genotype exerted no significant effect (P > 0.05) on nematode community diversity or structure. The disease management treatments led to a reduction of specific trophic groups (e.g. Predacious c–p = 4), which of interest appeared to be counteracted by a potato genotype with vigorous growth phenotype e.g. cv. Sarpo Mira. The fluctuating climates led to disparate conditions, with enrichment conditions (bacterial feeding c–p = 1) dominating during the wet seasons of 2014 and 2015 versus the dry season of 2013 which induced an environmental stress (functional guild c–p = 2) on nematode communities. Conclusions Overall the functional guild indices in comparison to other indices or absolutes values, delivered the most accurate quantitative measurement with which to determine the occurrence of a specific disturbance relative to the cultivation of the studied cisgenic P. infestans-resistant potatoes.
    • Temporal patterns of inflammatory gene expression in local tissues after banding or burdizzo castration in cattle

      Pang, Wanyong; Earley, Bernadette; Sweeney, Torres; Gath, Vivian; Crowe, Mark A (Biomed Central, 2009-09-23)
      Background: Castration of male cattle has been shown to elicit inflammatory reactions and acute inflammation is initiated and sustained by the participation of cytokines. Methods: Sixty continental × beef bulls (Mean age 12 ± (s.e.) 0.2 months; Mean weight 341 ± (s.e.) 3.0 kg) were blocked by weight and randomly assigned to one of three treatments (n = 20 animals per treatment): 1) untreated control (Con); 2) banding castration at 0 min (Band); 3) Burdizzo castration at 0 min (Burd). Samples of the testis, epididymis and scrotal skin were collected surgically from 5 animals from each group at 12 h, 24 h, 7 d, and 14 d post-treatment, and analysed using real-time PCR. A repeated measurement analysis (Proc GLM) was performed using SAS. If there was no treatment and time interaction, main effects of treatment by time were tested by ANOVA. Results: Electrophoresis data showed that by 7 d post-castration RNA isolated from all the testicle samples of the Burd castrated animals, the epididymis and middle scrotum samples from Band castrates were degraded. Transitory effects were observed in the gene expression of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α at 12 h and 24 h post treatment. Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IFN-γ mRNA levels compared with Band and Con animals, but lower (P < 0.05) testicular TNF-α mRNA levels compared with Con animals. Band castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IL-6 mRNA levels than Burd castrates at 12 h post-castration. Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IL-8 mRNA levels than Band and Con animals at 24 h post-castration. In the epididymis, Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) IL-6 mRNA (both at 12 h and 24 h post treatment) and IL-8 mRNA (12 h post treatment) levels compared with Band and Con animals; Burd castrates had greater (P = 0.049) IL-10 mRNA levels than Band castrates at 12 h post-castration. Conclusion: Banding castration caused more inflammatory associated gene expression changes to the epididymis and scrotum than burdizzo. Burdizzo caused more severe acute inflammatory responses, in terms of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression, in the testis and epididymis than banding.
    • Temporal trends in bulk milk antibodies to Salmonella, Neospora caninum, and Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in Irish dairy herds

      O'Doherty, Eugene; Sayers, Riona; O'Grady, L. (Elsevier, 2012-10-29)
      Bulk milk samples were collected from 309 Irish dairy herds at four time points during 2009 and tested for antibodies to Salmonella spp., N. caninum, and L. hardjo, three abortifacient agents in Irish dairy herds. Of the 312 study herds, 49% vaccinated against Salmonella and 76% vaccinated against L. hardjo. In unvaccinated herds, the overall prevalence of antibody positive herds was 49% for Salmonella, 19% for N. caninum and 86% for L. hardjo. There was no association between both testing positive for and incidence of Salmonella or L. hardjo on sample date and calving season. A significant association was found between sample date and both testing positive for [p = <0.0001 OR = 2.41 (95% CI 1.54–3.80)] and incidence [p = 0.001 OR = 3.10 (95% CI 1.72–5.57)] of N. caninum. No association with region of Ireland was found for either testing positive for or incidence of N. caninum, or L. hardjo. There was however a tendency towards a higher incidence of Salmonella in regions of Ireland with higher cattle densities.
    • Temporal trends in bulk milk antibodies to Salmonella, Neospora caninum, and Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in Irish dairy herds

      O'Doherty, E.; Sayers, Riona; O'Grady, L. (Elsevier, 2012-10-29)
      Bulk milk samples were collected from 309 Irish dairy herds at four time points during 2009 and tested for antibodies to Salmonella spp., N. caninum, and L. hardjo, three abortifacient agents in Irish dairy herds. Of the 312 study herds, 49% vaccinated against Salmonella and 76% vaccinated against L. hardjo. In unvaccinated herds, the overall prevalence of antibody positive herds was 49% for Salmonella, 19% for N. caninum and 86% for L. hardjo. There was no association between both testing positive for and incidence of Salmonella or L. hardjo on sample date and calving season. A significant association was found between sample date and both testing positive for [p = <0.0001 OR = 2.41 (95% CI 1.54–3.80)] and incidence [p = 0.001 OR = 3.10 (95% CI 1.72–5.57)] of N. caninum. No association with region of Ireland was found for either testing positive for or incidence of N. caninum, or L. hardjo. There was however a tendency towards a higher incidence of Salmonella in regions of Ireland with higher cattle densities.
    • Temporal trends in reproductive performance in Irish dairy herds and associated risk factors

      Mee, John F (Biomed Central, 2004-03-01)
      Irish dairy herd fertility has been declining since the 1980s. The extent, nature and causes of this decline in fertility and the current status of Irish dairy herd fertility were described. An increase in calving interval of approximately one day per year has been recorded. The principal components of this trend have been an increased incidence of postpartum endocrinopathies, reduced expression of oestrus and a fall in conception rate. Both submission rate and calving-to-service interval have increased slightly over time. Significant risk factors associated with these trends have been strain substitution within the Holstein-Friesian breed and single trait selection for milk production. Critically, these changes have been reflected in loss of body condition. Contributory factors included increased herd size and possibly increased use of DIYAI. The most recent Irish study showed that 48% of cows conceived to first service and 14% of cows were not pregnant at the end of the industry-average 15-week spring breeding season. However, the top quartile of herds achieved a first-service conception rate of 59%, illustrating the wide variation between herds. These phenotypic trends were attributed to both genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. Recent Irish dairy herd fertility performance falls short of the targets set for seasonal compact calving.
    • Tending and thinning of broadleaves: A simple guide to selecting quality trees.

      Short, Ian (Select Media Ltd, 2011-11)
      This article describes a simple procedure that can be used to ensure that the correct trees are selected in broadleaf woodland before tending / thinning is carried out, and follows best practice based on the latest Teagasc Forestry research.
    • A test bacterial decontamination system for meat products

      Ward, Oonagh C.; Logue, Catherine M.; Sheridan, James J. (Teagasc, 2000-12)
      A pilot scale apparatus was designed to allow meat samples to be treated with steam at sub-atmospheric pressures and correspondingly reduced temperatures. Experiments were carried out to determine the effectiveness of sub-atmospheric steam decontamination in eliminating bacteria on the surface of fresh beef. This type of treatment can have special advantages in that steam can be produced at temperatures well below 100ºC. This means that the heat advantages of steam as a decontaminating agent can potentially be obtained at lower temperatures.
    • Texture of fruit and vegetable components of ready meals

      Downey, Gerard (Teagasc, 2000-12)
      Vegetable and fruit purées are important parts of prepared ready-meals. Further expansion of this food sector will depend among other things on improved and consistent product quality. Innovative organoleptic properties in ready-meal components will assist in product diversification and the growth of market share.
    • The significance of the differences in soil phosphorus representation and transport procedures in the SWAT and HSPF models and a comparison of their performance in estimating phosphorus loss from an agriculture catchment in Ireland

      Nasr, Ahmed Elssidig; Bruen, Michael; Moles, Richard; Byrne, Paul; O'Regan, Bernadette (TWRI, 2012-07-02)
      Phosphorus transported from agriculture land has been identified as a major source of water pollution in a large number of Irish catchments. Models of this process are required in order to design and assess management measures. This paper reports on the comparison and assessment of two of the most promising physically-based distributed models, SWAT and HSPF, with particular emphasis on their suitability for Irish conditions. The representation of the overall soil phosphorus cycle is similar in both models but there is a significant difference in the level of detail in describing the chemical and biochemical processes in each model. Also there are differences in modeling the mechanisms by which phosphorus is removed from the soil column and either transported in dissolved form with the runoff water or in particulate form attached to eroded or detached sediment. These differences could have a significant influence on performance when using either of the models to simulate phosphorus loss from any catchment. Both models are applied to estimating the phosphorus concentration at the outlet of the Clarianna catchment in north Tiperrary (Ireland). This catchment is small (23km2) and the landuse is mainly pasture on grey brown podozilic soils. The results of model calibration are presented along with an assessment of the usefulness of the model outputs as a water quality management tool.