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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11019/1101

Title: A nationwide survey of anthelmintic treatment failure on sheep farms in Ireland
Authors: Keegan, Jason D
Keane, Orla M
Good, Barbara
De Waal, Theo
Denny, Marian
Hanrahan, James P
Fitzgerald, William
Sheehan, Maresa
Keywords: Anthelmintic tretment failure
Sheep
Ireland
Anthelmintic resistance
Issue Date: 9-Feb-2017
Publisher: Biomed Central
Citation: Keegan, Jason D., et al. A nationwide survey of anthelmintic treatment failure on sheep farms in Ireland. Irish Veterinary Journal. 2017 Feb 09;70(1):7.DOI 10.1186/s13620-017-0086-9
Series/Report no.: Irish Veterinary Journal;vol 70
Abstract: Background Between 2013 and 2015 the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) administered a sheep technology adoption programme (STAP), with the aim of increasing profitability on Irish sheep farms by encouraging the adoption of best management practices. One of the options available to STAP participants was to test the efficacy of the anthelmintic treatment (benzimadazole, levamisole or macrocyclic lactone) used in their flocks by means of a drench test, which is a modification of the faecal egg count reduction test; individual faecal samples were collected from the same group of lambs before and after anthelmintic treatment, the number of eggs present pre and post treatment was subsequently determined from a pooled sample. Results In total, 4211 drench tests were undertaken by farmers during the 3 years of the programme. Information on the anthelmintic product used was available for 3771 of these tests; anthelmintics from the classes benzimidazole (BZ), levamisole (LV) and macrocyclic lactone (ML) (avermectins (AVM) plus moxidectin (MOX)) were used in 42.0%, 23.4% and 32.5% of tests, respectively. The remaining 2.1% of tests involved an inappropriate product. The efficacy of treatment against ‘other trichostrongyles’ (excluding Nematodirus spp and Strongyloides papillosus.) could be established for 1446 tests, and 51% of these tests were considered effective (i.e. a reduction of faecal egg count (FEC) ≥ 95%). There was a significant difference among the drug groups in efficacy; 31.5%, 51.9%, 62.5% and 84% of treatments were considered effective for BZ, LV, AVM, MOX, respectively. The efficacy of treatment against Nematodirus spp. could be established for 338 tests and the overall efficacy was 96%. Conclusions Due to the significant difference among the anthelmintic classes for efficacy against ‘other trichostrongyles’ along with the high level of efficacy against Nematodirus spp., a genus for which anthelmintic resistance is rarely reported, it is concluded that anthelmintic resistance was responsible for the majority of the anthelmintic treatment failures observed.
Description: peer-reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11019/1101
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13620-017-0086-9
Appears in Collections:Animal & Bioscience
Teagasc publications in Biomed Central

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