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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11019/1191

Title: Delaying pigs from the normal production flow is associated with health problems and poorer performance
Authors: Calderon Díaz, Julia
Diana, Alessia
Boyle, Laura
Leonard, Finola C
McElroy, Máire
McGettrick, Shane
Moriarty, John
Garcia Manzanilla, Edgar
Keywords: All-in/all-out
Performance
Pigs
Production flow
Respiratory diseases
Issue Date: 5-Jul-2017
Publisher: Biomed Central
Citation: Calderón Díaz JA, Diana A, Boyle LA, Leonard FC, McElroy M, McGettrick S, Moriarty J, García Manzanilla E. Delaying pigs from the normal production flow is associated with health problems and poorer performance. Porcine Health Management 2017;3(1):13; doi 10.1186/s40813-017-0061-6
Series/Report no.: Porcine Health Management;
Abstract: Background Delaying pigs from advancing through the production stages could have a negative impact on their health and performance. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible implications of delaying pigs from the normal production flow on pig health and performance in a farrow-to-finish commercial farm with a self-declared All-In/All-Out (AIAO) management. Results Three flows of pigs were defined, flow 1 (i.e. pigs that followed the normal production flow; 8 weeks in the nursery stage, 4 weeks in the growing stage and 8 weeks in the finisher stage), flow 2 (i.e. pigs delayed 1 week from advancing to the next production stage) and flow 3 (i.e. pigs delayed >1 week from advancing to the next production stage). Flow 3 included higher proportions of pigs from first parity sows and of lighter birth weights. When the 3 flows were matched by parity and birth weight, pigs in flow 2 were 3.8 times more likely to be lame prior to slaughter compared with pigs in flow 1. Similarly, pigs in flow 3 were more likely to be lame prior to slaughter, 4.5 times more likely to present pleurisy, 3.3 times more like to present pericarditis and 4.3 times more likely to have their heart condemned at slaughter compared with pigs in flow 1. Additionally, carcasses from pigs in flow 3 were 10 kg lighter compared with carcasses from pigs in flow 1. Conclusion Delayed pigs were more affected by disease and were lighter at slaughter. Besides animal welfare issues, these findings could represent considerable economic loses for pig producers. In practice, delaying pigs from the normal production flow translates into higher feeding costs, increase number of days to slaughter and increased labour requirements reducing production efficiency for the pig operation. In farrow-to-finish farms an ‘all-forward’ policy (i.e. no pig is left behind from stage to stage and a split marketing approach is applied when sending pigs to slaughter) might be more easily adhered to.
Description: peer-reviewed
This project was supported by the Irish Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) grant 14/S/832. Alessia Diana was supported by the Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Fund.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11019/1191
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40813-017-0061-6
Appears in Collections:Pig Development
Teagasc publications in Biomed Central

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