T-Stor
 

T-Stor >
Irish Journal of Agricultural & Food Research >
IJAFR, volume 52, no 2, 2013 >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11019/524

Title: Iodine concentrations in milk
Authors: O'Brien, Bernadette
Gleeson, David E
Jordan, Kieran
Keywords: Dietary supplementation
Iodine
Milk
Teat disinfection
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Teagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Ireland
Citation: B. O’Brien, D. Gleeson and K. Jordan. 2013. Iodine concentrations in milk. Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research 52: 209–216
Series/Report no.: Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research;vol 52
Abstract: Iodine tends to be supplemented at farm level in the expectation of increasing cow health and fertility. There is concern that such practices may result in high milk iodine, which could affect ingredients for infant formula and, thus, dairy export markets. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of iodine fortified feed and teat disinfection practices of dairy cows on milk iodine concentration. Thirty lactating cows were fed 7 kg, 3 kg (10 mg iodine/kg) and 0 kg of concentrate feed during 3 periods of 35 days each. During the first 14 days of each period, cows were on dietary iodine treatments only; during days 15–21, one of three teat disinfection treatments (n = 10) was applied (in addition to the dietary iodine treatments): non-iodine (chlorhexidine) post-milking spray; 0.5% iodine spray post-milking; 0.5% iodine spray pre- and post-milking. Cow milk yield was 21.3 kg/day. Individual cow milk samples were analysed for iodine concentration on 2 days at the end of each treatment period. Dietary supplementation of iodine at both 30 mg and 70 mg/day, when compared to the diet with no supplement, increased milk iodine concentrations significantly (P < 0.001) from 449 to 1034 and 915 μg/kg, respectively. Teat disinfection both pre- and post-milking increased milk iodine concentration at each of the dietary supplementation levels of 0, 30 and 70 mg/day compared with a non-iodine teat disinfectant (P < 0.001). In conclusion, both dietary iodine supplementation and teat disinfection iodine increased milk iodine concentrations in an additive manner, exceeding common target values of 250 μg/kg. As both iodine treatments can occur simultaneously on farm, supplementation strategies should be monitored.
Description: peer-reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11019/524
ISSN: 0791-6833
Appears in Collections:Livestock Systems
Food Safety
IJAFR, volume 52, no 2, 2013

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
ijafr_209-216.pdf84.78 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

This item is protected by original copyright


View Statistics

Items in T-Stor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! Teagasc - The Agriculture and Food Development Authority  2012  - Feedback