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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11019/625

Title: Manipulating the ensilage of wilted, unchopped grass through the use of additive treatments
Authors: McEniry, Joseph
O'Kiely, Padraig
Clipson, N.W.J.
Forristal, P.D.
Doyle, E.M.
Keywords: Additive
Baled silage
Precision-chop silage
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: Teagasc, Oak Park, Carlow, Ireland
Citation: J. McEniry, P. O’Kiely, N.J.W. Clipson, P.D. Forristal and E.M. Doyle. Manipulating the ensilage of wilted, unchopped grass through the use of additive treatments. Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research 46: 77–91, 2007
Series/Report no.: Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research;vol 46
Abstract: Baled silage composition frequently differs from that of comparable conventional precision-chop silage. The lower final concentration of fermentation products in baled silage makes it more conducive to the activities of undesirable microorganisms. Silage additives can be used to encourage beneficial microbial activity and/or inhibit detrimental microbial activity. The experiment was organised in a 2 (chop treatments) × 6 (additive treatments) × 2 (stages of ensilage) factorial arrangement of treatments (n = 3 silos/treatment) to suggest additive treatments for use in baled silage production that would help create conditions more inhibitory to the activities of undesirable microorganisms and realise an outcome comparable to precision-chop silage. Chopping the herbage prior to ensiling, in the absence of an additive treatment, improved the silage fermentation. In the unchopped herbage, where the fermentation was poorer, the lactic acid bacterial inoculant resulted in an immediate increase (P < 0.001) in lactic acid concentration and a faster decline (P < 0.001) in pH with a subsequent reduction in butyric acid (P < 0.001) and ammonia-N (P < 0.01) concentrations. When sucrose was added in addition to the lactic acid bacterial inoculant, the combined treatment had a more pronounced effect on pH, butyric acid and ammonia-N values at the end of ensilage. The formic acid based additive and the antimicrobial mixture restricted the activities of undesirable microorganisms resulting in reduced concentrations of butyric acid (P < 0.001) and ammonia-N (P < 0.01). These additives offer a potential to create conditions in baled silage more inhibitory to the activities of undesirable microorganisms.
Description: peer-reviewed
A Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Research Scholarship awarded to J. McEniry supported this study.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11019/625
ISSN: 0791-6833
Appears in Collections:Crop Science
Grassland Science
IJAFR volume 46, 2007

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