• 28. The effect of phenotypically ranking beef cattle for residual methane output on daily methane emissions, intensity and animal productivity

      Smith, Paul E.; Waters, Sinéad M.; Kenny, David A.; Kirwan, Stuart F.; Conroy, Stephen; Kelly, Alan K.; European Union; 16/RD/ERAGAS/1RUMENPREDICT-ROI2017; 818368 (Elsevier BV, 2021-04)
      Beef cattle ranked as having low residual methane output had lower emissions intensity and similar overall productive performance as their high emissions ranking contemporaries. The concept of residual methane output is proposed as an appropriate trait to more equitably identify animals on the basis of low emissions beef production
    • Effect of dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation on the transcriptional profile of bovine jejunal epithelium

      Keogh, Kate; Waters, Sinead M.; Cormican, Paul; Kelly, Alan K.; Kenny, David A.; Science Foundation Ireland; 09/RFP/GEN2447 (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018-03-19)
      Compensatory growth (CG), an accelerated growth phenomenon which occurs following a period of dietary restriction is utilised worldwide in animal production systems as a management practise to lower feed costs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of jejunal epithelial to CG in cattle through transcriptional profiling following a period of dietary restriction as well as subsequent re-alimentation induced CG. Sixty Holstein Friesian bulls were separated into two groups; RES and ADLIB, with 30 animals in each. RES animals were offered a restricted diet for 125 days (Period 1) followed by ad libitum feeding for 55 days (Period 2). ADLIB animals had ad libitum access to feed across both periods 1 and 2. At the end of each period, 15 animals from each treatment group were slaughtered, jejunal epithelium collected and RNAseq analysis performed. Animals that were previously diet restricted underwent CG, gaining 1.8 times the rate of their non-restricted counterparts. Twenty-four genes were differentially expressed in RES compared to ADLIB animals at the end of Period 1, with only one gene, GSTA1, differentially expressed between the two groups at the end of Period 2. When analysed within treatment (RES, Period 2 v Period 1), 31 genes were differentially expressed between diet restricted and animals undergoing CG. Dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation were associated with altered expression of genes involved in digestion and metabolism as well as those involved in cellular division and growth. Compensatory growth was also associated with greater expression of genes involved in cellular protection and detoxification in jejunal epithelium. This study highlights some of the molecular mechanisms regulating the response to dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation induced CG in cattle; however the gene expression results suggest that most of the CG in jejunal epithelium had occurred by day 55 of re-alimentation.
    • Effect of dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation on the transcriptional profile of bovine jejunal epithelium

      Keogh, Kate; Waters, Sinead M.; Cormican, Paul; Kelly, Alan K.; Kenny, David A.; Science Foundation Ireland; 09/ RFP/GEN2447 (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018-03-19)
      Compensatory growth (CG), an accelerated growth phenomenon which occurs following a period of dietary restriction is utilised worldwide in animal production systems as a management practise to lower feed costs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of jejunal epithelial to CG in cattle through transcriptional profiling following a period of dietary restriction as well as subsequent re-alimentation induced CG. Sixty Holstein Friesian bulls were separated into two groups; RES and ADLIB, with 30 animals in each. RES animals were offered a restricted diet for 125 days (Period 1) followed by ad libitum feeding for 55 days (Period 2). ADLIB animals had ad libitum access to feed across both periods 1 and 2. At the end of each period, 15 animals from each treatment group were slaughtered, jejunal epithelium collected and RNAseq analysis performed. Animals that were previously diet restricted underwent CG, gaining 1.8 times the rate of their non-restricted counterparts. Twenty-four genes were differentially expressed in RES compared to ADLIB animals at the end of Period 1, with only one gene, GSTA1, differentially expressed between the two groups at the end of Period 2. When analysed within treatment (RES, Period 2 v Period 1), 31 genes were differentially expressed between diet restricted and animals undergoing CG. Dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation were associated with altered expression of genes involved in digestion and metabolism as well as those involved in cellular division and growth. Compensatory growth was also associated with greater expression of genes involved in cellular protection and detoxification in jejunal epithelium. This study highlights some of the molecular mechanisms regulating the response to dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation induced CG in cattle; however the gene expression results suggest that most of the CG in jejunal epithelium had occurred by day 55 of re-alimentation.
    • Effect of floor type on performance, lying time and dirt scores of finishing beef cattle: A meta-analysis

      Keane, Michael P.; McGee, Mark; O'Riordan, Edward G.; Kelly, Alan K.; Earley, Bernadette; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; WF2013073 (Elsevier BV, 2018-03-29)
      Data from individual studies evaluating the effect of housing systems on performance, lying time and dirt scores of finishing beef cattle are conflicting. The objective of this study was to collate the data from previous animal housing studies and quantify, through meta-analysis, the effect of floor type on animal performance, lying time and dirt scores. From 38 peer-reviewed articles, published between 1969 and 2017, 18 were determined to be eligible for meta-analysis. Papers were included in the study if they contained information on the effect of floor surface on animal performance (average daily liveweight gain (ADG), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and carcass weight), lying behaviour or animal cleanliness. There was no difference (P > 0.10) in ADG, FCR or carcass weight between concrete slatted floors (CSF) and CSF overlaid with rubber mats (RM). Using RM had no effect (P > 0.10) on lying duration or dirt scores of cattle. There was no difference (P > 0.10) in the ADG, FCR, carcass weight, lying duration or cleanliness of cattle housed on CSF or straw bedding. It was concluded that using RM or straw instead of CSF had no effect on performance, lying time or dirt scores.
    • Sward type alters the relative abundance of members of the rumen microbial ecosystem in dairy cows

      Smith, Paul E.; Enriquez-Hidalgo, Daniel; Hennessy, Deirdre; McCabe, Matthew S.; Kenny, David A.; Kelly, Alan K.; Waters, Sinéad M.; FACCE ERA GAS; Irish Dairy Levy Trust; European Union; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-06-09)
      The performance of ruminant livestock has been shown to beneft from the enhanced nutritive value and herbage yield associated with clover incorporation in the grazing sward. However, little research to date has been conducted investigating the efects of mixed swards containing white clover on the composition of the rumen microbiome. In this study, the rumen microbial composition of late lactation dairy cows grazing perennial ryegrass only (PRG; n=20) or perennial ryegrass and white clover (WCPRG; n=19) swards, was characterised using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. PERMANOVA analysis indicated diet signifcantly altered the composition of the rumen microbiome (P=0.024). Subtle shifts in the relative abundance of 14 bacterial genera were apparent between diets, including an increased relative abundance of Lachnospira (0.04 vs. 0.23%) and Pseudobutyrivibrio (1.38 vs. 0.81%) in the WCPRG and PRG groups, respectively. The composition of the archaeal community was altered between dietary groups, with a minor increase in the relative abundance of Methanosphaera in the WCPRG observed. Results from this study highlight the potential for sward type to infuence the composition of the rumen microbial community.