• Analysis of DRB1 exon 2 genotyping by STR size analysis in Suffolk and Texel sheep breeds

      Sayers, Gearoid; Mitchel, S; Ryan, Marion T; Stear, Michael J.; Hanrahan, James P; Sweeney, Torres; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Wellcome Trust; RSF16; 061354 (Teagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Ireland, 2004)
      Alleles of the DRB1 exon 2 locus of the major histocompatibility complex have recently been associated with genetic resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep. While sequence-based typing is the standard method for allele discrimination, a rapid, high throughput method for DRB1 exon 2 genotyping is required if such information is to be incorporated into national breeding programmes. Previous studies have highlighted a simple tandem repeat (STR) located within intron 2 of the DRB1 gene, which could potentially be used to accurately assess the allele present within the adjacent exon 2. The aims of this study were firstly to compare two methods of STR analysis, Genescan™ and autoradiography, and secondly to investigate if STR analysis of DRB1 intron 2 could be used to accurately assess the profile of DRB1 exon 2. Six DRB1 exon 2 alleles were identified by sequence-based typing in Suffolk (n = 31) and eight in Texel (n = 60) sheep. The results indicated that Genescan™ was a more accurate method of STR analysis than autoradiography. The expected 1:1 correspondence between STR size, analysed by Genescan™ and DRB1 exon 2 allele, determined by sequence-based typing, was not observed. However, the correspondence was found to be degenerate, whereby some alleles were associated with two STR sizes. Thus, irrespective of the STR size identified, STR analysis by Genescan™ identified the correct allele in all cases within both populations of animals studied. However, the Genescan™ method of allele identification cannot be used for Suffolk × Texel crossbred progeny or in other breeds where the relationship between STR size and DRB1 exon 2 allele is not known.
    • The host immune response to gastrointestinal nematode infection in sheep

      McRae, Kathryn M.; Stear, Michael J.; Good, Barbara; Keane, Orla M; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Allan and Grace Kay Overseas Scholarship; European Union; BBSRC Animal Health Research Club; BB/l004070/1 (Wiley, 2015-10-20)
      Gastrointestinal nematode infection represents a major threat to the health, welfare and productivity of sheep populations worldwide. Infected lambs have a reduced ability to absorb nutrients from the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in morbidity and occasional mortality. The current chemo-dominant approach to nematode control is considered unsustainable due to the increasing incidence of anthelmintic resistance. In addition there is growing consumer demand for food products from animals not subjected to chemical treatment. Future mechanisms of nematode control must rely on alternative, sustainable strategies such as vaccination or selective breeding of resistant animals. Such strategies take advantage of the host's natural immune response to nematodes. The ability to resist gastrointestinal nematode infection is considered to be dependent on the development of a protective acquired immune response; although the precise immune mechanisms involved in initiating this process remain to be fully elucidated. In this paper current knowledge on the innate and acquired host immune response to gastrointestinal nematode infection in sheep and the development of immunity is reviewed.