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dc.contributor.authorSTANTON, CATHERINE*
dc.contributor.authorRoss, R Paul*
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Gerald F*
dc.contributor.authorCollins, K.*
dc.contributor.authorMcBrearty, S.*
dc.contributor.authorGardiner, Gillian E.*
dc.contributor.authorDesmond, C.*
dc.contributor.authorKelly, J.*
dc.contributor.authorBouchier, Paul J.*
dc.contributor.authorLawless, Fergal*
dc.contributor.authorAuty, Mark*
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, M.O.*
dc.contributor.authorMullins, C.*
dc.contributor.authorMullholand, E.*
dc.contributor.authorEason, D.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-02T14:10:19Z
dc.date.available2017-08-02T14:10:19Z
dc.date.issued2001-05-01
dc.identifier.citationStanton, C., Ross, R.P., Fitzgerald, G., Collins, K., et al., Application of Probiotic Bacteria to Functional Foods, End of Project Reports, Teagasc, 2001.en_GB
dc.identifier.isbn1841701769
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/1280
dc.descriptionEnd of Project Reporten_GB
dc.description.abstractProbiotic cultures are described as live microbial feed supplements that improve intestinal microbial balance and are intended for maintenance of health or prevention, rather than the curing of disease. The demand for probiotic foods is increasing in Europe, Japan and the U.S. reflecting the heightened awareness among the public of the relationship between diet and health. Traditionally, the most popular food delivery systems for these cultures have been freshly fermented dairy foods, such as yogurts and fermented milks, as well as unfermented milks with cultures added. However, in the development of functional foods, the technological suitability of probiotic strains poses a serious challenge since their survival and viability may be adversely affected by processing conditions as well as by the product environment and storage conditions. This is a particular concern, given that high levels (at least 107 per gram or ml) of live micro-organisms are recommended for probiotic products. In previous studies (see DPRC No. 29) the successful manufacture of probiotic Cheddar cheese harbouring high levels (>108 cfu/g) of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei NFBC 338 strain was reported. Hence, the overall objective of these studies was to continue the development and evaluation of Functional Foods containing high levels of viable probiotic bacteria, with particular emphasis on overcoming the technological barriers and the identification of strains suited to particular applications, such as incorporation into Cheddar cheese and spray-dried powders.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Agriculture, Food and the Marineen_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTeagascen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEnd of Project Reports;
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDairy Products Research Centre;31
dc.subjectProbiotic bacteriaen_GB
dc.subjectFunctional foodsen_GB
dc.subjecttechnological barriersen_GB
dc.subjectCheddar cheeseen_GB
dc.subjectSpray-dried powdersen_GB
dc.subjectLb. paracasei NFBC 338en_GB
dc.subjectSensory evaluationen_GB
dc.subjectbifidobacteriaen_GB
dc.titleApplication of Probiotic Bacteria to Functional Foodsen_GB
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_GB
dc.identifier.rmis4527
dc.identifier.rmis4840
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-12T08:50:17Z


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