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dc.contributor.authorLeonard, Nola
dc.contributor.authorCrilly, Jim
dc.contributor.authorO'Farrell, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-16T10:23:28Z
dc.date.available2017-08-16T10:23:28Z
dc.date.issued1998-12-01
dc.identifier.citationLeonard, N., Crilly, J., O'Farrell, K., Efficacy of curently reccommended control measures for lameness in dairy cows, End of Project Reports, Teagasc, 1998.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/1474
dc.descriptionEnd of Project Reporten_GB
dc.description.abstractLameness is a multifactorial condition, the principal factors influencing its development being genetics, nutrition, environment and management. The objectives of the studies reported here were: (i) To determine the incidence of lameness on selected Irish commercial dairy farms, ii) To identify and to quantify risk factors associated with lameness on Irish dairy farms and (iii) To evaluate the efficacy of recommended control measures for lameness with the aid of information obtained through (i) and (ii). • The average number of animals which became lame per six month period (Jan-Jun or July-December) on 14 commercial dairy farms was between 12 and 16 per 100 cows. On individual farms the figure could be as high as 31 per 100 during any six month period. • White line disease was the most common cause of lameness with sole ulceration being the second most common. • Poor maintenance of roads with little use of top dressing and the presence of concrete roadways on farms were both associated with a detrimental effect on lameness incidence. Thus, prevention of lameness at pasture entails maintaining roads in good condition and, if concrete roads are used for cows, care must be taken to ensure that the junction between the concrete and the dirt road is maintained in good condition and that the concrete is maintained free of grit. • Cubicles on most farms have not been upgraded sufficiently to provide adequate cow comfort. Many are too small for the size of cows housed and bedding is frequently insufficient. Uncomfortable housing conditions resulted in less lying behaviour and more standing half-in cubicles. • Restricted feed space was associated with more lameness. Experimental studies suggested that this effect was likely to be mediated through increased aggression between animals. • Higher levels of concentrate feeding correlated with more lameness. Increasing fibre in the diet in the form of sugar beet pulp appeared to protect against lameness. There was some evidence that feeding maize silage may increase lameness incidence but this effect requires further study. Cows housed in all space-sharing cubicle designs tested showed good lying times. The finding that cows will reduce use of cubicles in order to stand on a soft matted area suggests that even spacesharing cubicles may not always provide sufficiently comfortable conditions for cows. It also reinforces the findings of work at Moorepark and elsewhere that cows do not like standing on concrete in addition to the fact that it can be detrimental to claw health. All of the above findings suggest that lameness incidence could be reduced by maintaining roads in good condition, avoiding the use of concrete if possible, providing comfortable housing conditions and avoiding all design features which reduce cubicle occupancy and which increase aggression between cows.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipDairy Levy Farmer Fundsen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Union Structural Funds (EAGGF)
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTeagascen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEnd of Project Reports;
dc.subjectDairy cowsen_GB
dc.subjectLamenessen_GB
dc.subjectRisk factorsen_GB
dc.subjectControl measuresen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of curently reccommended control measures for lameness in dairy cows.en_GB
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_GB
dc.identifier.rmis3981
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-12T08:40:01Z


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