• The effect of buttermilk or buttermilk powder addition on functionality, textural, sensory and volatile characteristics of Cheddar-style cheese

      Hickey, Cian D.; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Davis, Jessica; Scholz, Dimitri; Kilcawley, Kieran; Wilkinson, M.G.; Sheehan, Diarmuid (JJ); Dairy Levy Trust; 6259 (Elsevier, 2017-09-28)
      The influence of buttermilk or buttermilk powder addition to cheese milk or cheese curds respectively on cheese functional properties, free fatty acid profiles and subsequent volatile and sensory characteristics was investigated. Buttermilk addition to cheese milk resulted in a softer cheese compared to other cheeses, with a significantly reduced flowability, while buttermilk powder addition had no influence on cheese firmness but cheese flowability was also reduced compared to the control cheese. Larger pools of free fat, higher levels of free fatty acids, volatile compounds and significant differences in sensory profiles associated with off-flavour were also observed with the addition of buttermilk to cheese milk. Application of light microscopy, using toluidine blue stain, facilitated the visualisation of fat globule structure and distribution within the protein matrix. Addition of 10% buttermilk powder resulted in significant increases in volatile compounds originating from proteolysis pathways associated with roasted, green aromas. Descriptive sensory evaluation indicated few differences between the 10% buttermilk powder and the control cheese, while buttermilk cheeses scored negatively for sweaty, barnyard aromas, oxidized and off flavors, correlating with associated volatile aromas. Addition of 10% buttermilk powder to cheese curds results in cheese comparable to the control Cheddar with some variations in volatile compounds resulting in a cheese with similar structural and sensory characteristics albeit with subtle differences in overall cheese flavor. This could be manipulated to produce cheeses of desirable quality, with potential health benefits due to increased phospholipid levels in cheese.
    • Effect of different forage types on the volatile and sensory properties of bovine milk

      Faulkner, Hope; O'Callaghan, Tom; McAuliffe, Stephen; Hennessy, Deirdre; STANTON, CATHERINE; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Kerry, Joseph P.; Kilcawley, Kieran; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 13SN401 (Elsevier, 2017-12-08)
      The effect of 3 diets (grass, grass/clover, and total mixed ration) on the volatile and sensory properties of bovine milk was assessed over an entire lactation season. Little evidence was found of direct transfer of terpenes into raw milk from the different diets, and it is likely that the monocultures of ryegrass used with and without white clover were factors as these contained very few terpenes. Evidence of direct transfer of nonterpene volatiles from forage to the subsequent raw milks was probable; however, differences in the protein carbohydrate availability and digestion in the rumen appeared to have a greater contribution to volatile profiles. Pasteurization significantly altered the volatile profiles of all milks. A direct link between the milk fatty acid content, forage, and volatile products of lipid oxidation was also evident and differences in fatty acid content of milk due to forage may also have influenced the viscosity perception of milk. Irish sensory assessors preferred pasteurized milk produced from grass-fed cows, with least preference from milk produced from total mixed ration diets. β-Carotene content was significantly higher in milks derived from grass or grass/clover and appears to have directly influenced color perception. Toluene and p-cresol are both degradation products of β-carotene and along with β-carotene were identified as potential biomarkers for milk derived from pasture. The only correlation that appeared to influence the flavor of milk as determined using ranked descriptive analysis was p-cresol. P-Cresol appears to be responsible for the barnyard aroma of milk and is also likely derived from the deamination and decarboxylation of tryptophan and tyrosine due to the higher levels of available protein in the grass and grass/clover diets. The highest levels of p-cresol were in the grass/clover diets and are likely due to the degradation of the isoflavone formononetin in the rumen, which is present in white clover swards.
    • Evaluation of the Potential of Lactobacillus paracasei Adjuncts for Flavor Compounds Development and Diversification in Short-Aged Cheddar Cheese

      Stefanovic, Ewelina; Kilcawley, Kieran; Roces, Clara; Rea, Mary; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Sheehan, Diarmuid (JJ); McAuliffe, Olivia; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 2012040 (Frontiers, 05/07/2018)
      The non-starter microbiota of Cheddar cheese mostly comprises mesophilic lactobacilli, such as Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Lactobacillus plantarum. These bacteria are recognized for their potential to improve Cheddar cheese flavor when used as adjunct cultures. In this study, three strains of L. paracasei (DPC2071, DPC4206, and DPC4536) were evaluated for their contribution to the enhancement and diversification of flavor in short-aged Cheddar cheese. The strains were selected based on their previously determined genomic diversity, variability in proteolytic enzyme activities and metabolic capability in cheese model systems. The addition of adjunct cultures did not affect the gross composition or levels of lipolysis of the cheeses. The levels of free amino acids (FAA) in cheeses showed a significant increase after 28 days of ripening. However, the concentrations of individual amino acids in the cheeses did not significantly differ except for some amino acids (aspartic acid, threonine, serine, and tryptophan) at Day 14. Volatile profile analysis revealed that the main compounds that differentiated the cheeses were of lipid origin, such as long chain aldehydes, acids, ketones, and lactones. This study demonstrated that the adjunct L. paracasei strains contributed to the development and diversification of compounds related to flavor in short-aged Cheddar cheeses.
    • Evaluation of the Potential of Lactobacillus paracasei Adjuncts for Flavor Compounds Development and Diversification in Short-Aged Cheddar Cheese

      Stefanovic, Ewelina; Kilcawley, Kieran; Roces, Clara; Rea, Mary; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Sheehan, Diarmuid (JJ); McAuliffe, Olivia; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 2012040 (Frontiers, 2018-07-05)
      The non-starter microbiota of Cheddar cheese mostly comprises mesophilic lactobacilli, such as Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Lactobacillus plantarum. These bacteria are recognized for their potential to improve Cheddar cheese flavor when used as adjunct cultures. In this study, three strains of L. paracasei (DPC2071, DPC4206, and DPC4536) were evaluated for their contribution to the enhancement and diversification of flavor in short-aged Cheddar cheese. The strains were selected based on their previously determined genomic diversity, variability in proteolytic enzyme activities and metabolic capability in cheese model systems. The addition of adjunct cultures did not affect the gross composition or levels of lipolysis of the cheeses. The levels of free amino acids (FAA) in cheeses showed a significant increase after 28 days of ripening. However, the concentrations of individual amino acids in the cheeses did not significantly differ except for some amino acids (aspartic acid, threonine, serine, and tryptophan) at Day 14. Volatile profile analysis revealed that the main compounds that differentiated the cheeses were of lipid origin, such as long chain aldehydes, acids, ketones, and lactones. This study demonstrated that the adjunct L. paracasei strains contributed to the development and diversification of compounds related to flavor in short-aged Cheddar cheeses.
    • The impact of sugar particle size manipulation on the physical and sensory properties

      Richardson, Aislinn M.; Tyuftin, Andrey A.; Kilcawley, Kieran; Gallagher, Eimear; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Kerry, Joseph P.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 14F 812 (Elsevier, 2018-04-16)
      The overall objective of this research was to assess the effect of sugar particle size manipulation on the physical and sensory properties of chocolate brownies. A control sugar (commercially available, 200-5181 μm) and four of its sieved sugar separates (mesh size of 710, 500, 355 and 212 μm) were determined by grinding and sieving. The particle diameter and diameter distributions of the control sugar and each sugar fraction were measured. As a result, five sugar treatments were determined for chocolate brownie formulations; Control (C200-5181 μm), Large-particle replacement (LPR924-1877 μm), Medium-particle replacement (MPR627-1214 μm), Small-particle replacement (SPR459-972 μm) and a known MIX sample. Samples were tested using sensory (hedonic & intensity), instrumental (texture and colour) and compositional analyses (moisture and fat). Brownie samples containing the smallest sugar fraction (SPR459-972 μm) were perceived as significantly sweeter than any other sample (p < 0.05). Brownies containing this fraction were also the softest and moistest samples (p < 0.05). Texture liking was significantly associated with the LPR924-1877 μm brownie (p < 0.05). Darkness of brownie samples increased (p < 0.05) as sugar particle size decreased. Therefore, sugar particle size alteration affects the physical and sensory properties of chocolate brownies and could be used as a viable approach to reduce sugar in confectionery-type products.
    • Impact on the physicochemical and sensory properties of salt reduced corned beef formulated with and without the use of salt replacers

      Fellendorf, Susann; Kerry, Joseph P.; Hamill, Ruth; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 11 F 026 (Elsevier, 2018-03-02)
      The aim of this study was to investigate physicochemical and microbiological properties as well as a sensory (affective and descriptive) driven sodium reduction (0.2 g/100 g - 1.0 g/100 g product) strategy for a cured meat product (corned beef). A second aim was to use the same methodology to further reduce salt, using salt replacers. Significant differences in colour, hardness and cooking loss were measured. Corned beef samples low in sodium (0.2 g/100 g, 0.4 g/100 g) showed reduced (P < 0.05) saltiness perception, but were positively correlated (P > 0.05) to liking of flavour and overall acceptability. Samples formulated with CaCl2, MgCl2 and KCl scored higher (P < 0.01) in saltiness perceptions, but correlated negatively (P > 0.05) to liking of flavour and overall acceptability. However, a sodium reduction in corned beef was determined to be achievable as assessors liked (P < 0.05) the flavour of the sodium reduced corned beef containing 0.4 g/100 g sodium and formulated with potassium lactate and glycine (KLG), even with the noticeable lower salty taste. Sodium reduction in corned beef (packaged under modified atmosphere) did not negatively impact on the microbiological shelf-life.
    • Interaction of salt content and processing conditions drives the quality response in streaky rashers

      Delgado-Pando, Gonzalo; Allen, Paul; Kerry, Joseph P.; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Hamill, Ruth; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 11F 026 (Elsevier, 2018-07-26)
      Response surface methodology was utilised to explore the relationship between processing conditions, including cooking temperature and drying time, and ingredients in reduced-salt streaky rasher formulations. The goal of this project was to assess the impact of reducing salt content on physicochemical and sensory properties. Salt levels above 2.44 g/100 g did not affect cooking loss. Cooking temperature (240 °C) was negatively correlated with lightness and redness, n-3 fatty acids, and sensory acceptance, and positively correlated with hardness and monounsaturated fatty acids. Salt content was highly correlated with perceived saltiness and both were identified as negative attributes by the sensory panel. Results indicate that optimised reduced-salt streaky rashers with acceptable technological and sensory performance could be achieved under the following conditions: 2 g/100 g salt, 94 min of drying and grilling at 190 °C.
    • Microbial Succession and Flavor Production in the Fermented Dairy Beverage Kefir

      Walsh, Aaron M.; Crispie, Fiona; Kilcawley, Kieran; O'Sullivan, Orla; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Cotter, Paul D.; Science Foundation Ireland; SFI/12/RC/2273; SFI/11/PI/1137; et al. (2018-11-05)
      Kefir is a putatively health-promoting dairy beverage that is produced when a kefir grain, consisting of a consortium of microorganisms, is added to milk to initiate a natural fermentation. Here, a detailed analysis was carried out to determine how the microbial population, gene content, and flavor of three kefirs from distinct geographic locations change over the course of 24-h fermentations. Metagenomic sequencing revealed that Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens was the dominant bacterial species in kefir during early stages of fermentations but that Leuconostoc mesenteroides became more prevalent in later stages. This pattern is consistent with an observation that genes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis were absent from L. kefiranofaciens but were present in L. mesenteroides. Additionally, these shifts in the microbial community structure, and associated pathways, corresponded to changes in the levels of volatile compounds. Specifically, Acetobacter spp. correlated with acetic acid; Lactobacillus spp. correlated with carboxylic acids, esters and ketones; Leuconostoc spp. correlated with acetic acid and 2,3-butanedione; and Saccharomyces spp. correlated with esters. The correlation data suggest a causal relationship between microbial taxa and flavor that is supported by observations that addition of L. kefiranofaciens NCFB 2797 increased the levels of esters and ketones whereas addition of L. mesenteroides 213M0 increased the levels of acetic acid and 2,3-butanedione. Finally, we detected genes associated with probiotic functionalities in the kefir microbiome. Our results illustrate the dynamic nature of kefir fermentations and microbial succession patterns therein and can be applied to optimize the fermentation processes, flavors, and health-related attributes of this and other fermented foods. IMPORTANCE Traditional fermented foods represent relatively low-complexity microbial environments that can be used as model microbial communities to understand how microbes interact in natural environments. Our results illustrate the dynamic nature of kefir fermentations and microbial succession patterns therein. In the process, the link between individual species, and associated pathways, with flavor compounds is revealed and several genes that could be responsible for the purported gut health-associated benefits of consuming kefir are identified. Ultimately, in addition to providing an important fundamental insight into microbial interactions, this information can be applied to optimize the fermentation processes, flavors, and health-related attributes of this and other fermented foods.
    • Physical, textural and sensory characteristics of reduced sucrose cakes, incorporated with clean-label sugar-replacing alternative ingredients

      Milner, Laura; Kerry, Joseph P.; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Gallagher, Eimear; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Elsevier BV, 2020-01)
      High levels of sucrose in foods present a great risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore a low sucrose intake is strongly recommended. Sweet baked products incorporate high levels of sucrose. Sucrose in the original cake formulation was reduced and replaced with apple pomace, whey permeate, oligofructose, polydextrose. An acceptable sucrose reduction of between 21 and 27% was achieved. Cakes containing apple pomace had the lowest specific volume (1.8 cm3/g) and highest crumb firmness (8.60 N) (P < .05). Apple pomace and whey permeate had a significantly decreased L* values of the crust (P < .05). Moisture content of the cake crumb was increased significantly with the addition of oligofructose, whey permeate and polydextrose. All treatments resulted in a significant increase of the water activity of the cake crumb compared to the control (P < .05). Crumb cell structure was maintained as shown by 2-D and confocal imaging. Sensory trials revealed the reformulated cakes were acceptable to panellists.