• Biotechnological applications of functional metagenomics in the food and pharmaceutical industries

      Coughlan, Laura M.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Alvarez-Ordonez, Avelino; Science Foundation Ireland; 13/SIRG/2157 (Frontiers Media S. A., 30/06/2015)
      Microorganisms are found throughout nature, thriving in a vast range of environmental conditions. The majority of them are unculturable or difficult to culture by traditional methods. Metagenomics enables the study of all microorganisms, regardless of whether they can be cultured or not, through the analysis of genomic data obtained directly from an environmental sample, providing knowledge of the species present, and allowing the extraction of information regarding the functionality of microbial communities in their natural habitat. Function-based screenings, following the cloning and expression of metagenomic DNA in a heterologous host, can be applied to the discovery of novel proteins of industrial interest encoded by the genes of previously inaccessible microorganisms. Functional metagenomics has considerable potential in the food and pharmaceutical industries, where it can, for instance, aid (i) the identification of enzymes with desirable technological properties, capable of catalyzing novel reactions or replacing existing chemically synthesized catalysts which may be difficult or expensive to produce, and able to work under a wide range of environmental conditions encountered in food and pharmaceutical processing cycles including extreme conditions of temperature, pH, osmolarity, etc; (ii) the discovery of novel bioactives including antimicrobials active against microorganisms of concern both in food and medical settings; (iii) the investigation of industrial and societal issues such as antibiotic resistance development. This review article summarizes the state-of-the-art functional metagenomic methods available and discusses the potential of functional metagenomic approaches to mine as yet unexplored environments to discover novel genes with biotechnological application in the food and pharmaceutical industries.
    • A case of bovine raw milk contamination with Listeria monocytogenes

      Hunt, Karen; Drummond, Niall; Murphy, Mary; Butler, Francis; Buckley, James F.; Jordan, Kieran; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; European Union (Biomed Central, 06/07/2012)
      During routine sampling of bulk raw milk on a dairy farm, the pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes was found to be a contaminant, at numbers < 100 cfu/ml. A strain with an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern was isolated from the bulk milk two months later. Environmental swabs taken at the dairy environment were negative for the presence of L. monocytogenes, indicating a possible case of excretion of the L. monocytogenes directly into the milk. Milk samples were collected from the individual cows and analysed, resulting in the identification of L. monocytogenes excretion (at 280 cfu/ml) from one of the 4 mammary quarters of one dairy cow out of 180. When the infected cow was isolated from the herd, no L. monocytogenes was detected from the remaining herd. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern of the strain from the individual cow was indistinguishable from that originally isolated from the bulk milk. The infected cow did not show any clinical signs of disease, nor did the appearance of the milk have any physical abnormalities. Antibiotic treatment of the infected mammary quarter was found to be ineffective. This study shows that there can be risks associated with direct contamination of raw milk with L. monocytogenes.
    • Characterisation and application of fruit by-products as novel ingredients in gluten-free products

      O'Shea, Norah; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland (2014-01)
      Literature has revealed that “waste” left from the processing of fruit can still contain a substantial quantity of macro and minor nutrients. The aim of this thesis was to ascertain the nutritional and structural properties and potential uses of two fruit by-products [apple pomace (Malus domestica Cv. “Karmijn de Sonnaville”) and orange pomace (Citrus sinensis L. Cv. “Valencia”)] in glutenfree bread and extruded snack formulations. The physicochemical and nutritional properties of the fruit by-products were initially studied. Apple pomace contained a high level of fibre and pectin. The isolated pectin was demonstrated to have a high level of methylation which developed viscous pastes. Orange pomace also had high levels of fibre and pectin, and it was an abundant source of minerals such as potassium and magnesium. Orange pomace had a poor gelling ability. The flour obtained after milling dried orange pomace was used in the formulation of gluten-free bread with the aid of a response surface design. Due to the fibrous properties of orange pomace flour, proofing and water addition were also studied. When added at levels greater than 6%, the loaf volume decreased. The number of cells per slice also decreased with increasing orange pomace addition. Inclusion of orange pomace at levels of up to 4% increased crumb softness. An optimised formulation and proofing time was derived using the optimisation tool; these consisted of 5.5% orange pomace, 94.6% water inclusion and with 49 minutes proofing. These optimised parameters doubled the total dietary fibre content of the bread compared to the original control. The pasting properties, rheology, microstructure and sensory characteristics of the optimised formulation (batter and bread) were investigated. Pasting results showed how orange pomace inclusions reduced the final viscosity of the batter, hence reducing the occurrence of starch gelatinisation. Rheological properties such as the storage modulus (G') and complex modulus (G*) increased in the orange pomace batter compared to the control batter. This demonstrates how the orange pomace as an ingredient improved the robustness of the formulation. Sensory panellists scored the orange pomace bread comparably to the control bread. Milled apple pomace was studied as a potential novel ingredient in an extruded snack. As extrusion requires the trialling of a number of extruder parameters, a response surface design was again used to develop an optimised snack. The parameters studied were apple pomace addition, die head temperature and screw speed. Screw speed had the most significant impact on extrudate characteristics. As screw speed increased the favourable extrudate characteristics such as radical expansion ratio, porosity and specific volume decreased. The inclusion of apple pomace had a negative effect on extrudate characteristics at levels greater than 8% addition. Including apple pomace reduced the hardness and increased the crispiness of the snack. Using the optimisation tool, the optimised and validated formulation and extrusion process contained the following parameters: 7.7% apple pomace, 150oC die head temperature and a screw speed of 69 rpm.
    • Characterization of functional properties of proteins from Ganxet beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Ganxet) isolated using an ultrasound-assisted methodology

      Lafarga, Tomas; Álvarez García, Carlos; Bobo, Gloria; Aguilo-Aguayo, Ingrid; Generalitat de Catalunya; Juan de la Cierva contract award; Postdoctoral Senior Grant Ramon y Cajal; FJCI-2016-29541; RYC-2016-19949 (Elsevier, 2018-08-17)
      This study investigated different methods of extraction of protein from Ganxet beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Ganxet) and evaluated the functional properties of these valuable proteins. Overall, ultrasound processing (40 kHz, 250 W) resulted in higher yields and increased percentages of material solubilized and proteins recovered. The highest percentage of recovered protein was obtained after extraction using 0.4 M NaOH followed by ultrasound processing for 60 min and was calculated as 78.73 ± 4.88% (p < 0.05). Extraction using 0.4 M NaOH followed by sonication for 60 min resulted in the highest yield and percentage of solubilized material calculated as 37.98 ± 0.02 and 54.58 ± 0.19%, respectively (p < 0.05). The water- and oil-holding capacities of the Ganxet protein concentrate were calculated as 2.33 ± 0.12 and 2.69 ± 0.32 g of water or oil per g of protein concentrate, respectively. The highest emulsifying capacity was observed at pH 8.0 and was calculated as 69.4 ± 0.8%.
    • Comparative and functional genomics of the Lactococcus lactis taxon; insights into evolution and niche adaptation

      Kelleher, Philip; Bottacini, Francesca; Mahony, Jennifer; Kilcawley, Kieran; van Sinderen, Douwe; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; Science Foundation Ireland; 10/RD/TMFRC/704; 13/IA/1953; 14/TIDA/2287; et al. (Biomed Central, 29/03/2017)
      Background Lactococcus lactis is among the most widely studied lactic acid bacterial species due to its long history of safe use and economic importance to the dairy industry, where it is exploited as a starter culture in cheese production. Results In the current study, we report on the complete sequencing of 16 L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genomes. The chromosomal features of these 16 L. lactis strains in conjunction with 14 completely sequenced, publicly available lactococcal chromosomes were assessed with particular emphasis on discerning the L. lactis subspecies division, evolution and niche adaptation. The deduced pan-genome of L. lactis was found to be closed, indicating that the representative data sets employed for this analysis are sufficient to fully describe the genetic diversity of the taxon. Conclusions Niche adaptation appears to play a significant role in governing the genetic content of each L. lactis subspecies, while (differential) genome decay and redundancy in the dairy niche is also highlighted.
    • Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Divergent Phenotypes for Water Holding Capacity across the Post Mortem Ageing Period in Porcine Muscle Exudate

      Di Luca, Alessio; Hamill, Ruth; Mullen, Anne Maria; Slavov, Nikolai; Giuliano, Elia; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; 06RDNUIG470 (PLOS, 07/03/2016)
      Two dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and mass spectrometry were applied to investigate the changes in metabolic proteins that occur over a seven day (day 1, 3 and 7) post mortem ageing period in porcine centrifugal exudate from divergent meat quality phenotypes. The objectives of the research were to enhance our understanding of the phenotype (water holding capacity) and search for biomarkers of this economically significant pork quality attribute. Major changes in protein abundance across nine phenotype-by-time conditions were observed. Proteomic patterns were dominated by post mortem ageing timepoint. Using a machine learning algorithm (l1-regularized logistic regression), a model was derived with the ability to discriminate between high drip and low drip phenotypes using a subset of 25 proteins with an accuracy of 63%. Models discriminating between divergent phenotypes with accuracy of 72% and 73% were also derived comparing respectively, high drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus low drip and comparing low drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus high drip. In all comparisons, the general classes of discriminatory proteins identified include metabolic enzymes, stress response, transport and structural proteins. In this research we have enhanced our understanding of the protein related processes underpinning this phenotype and provided strong data to work toward development of protein biomarkers for water holding capacity.
    • Comparison of methods for the identification and sub-typing of O157 and non-O157 Escherichia coli serotypes and their integration into a polyphasic taxonomy approach

      Prieto-Calvo, M.A.; Omer, M.K.; Alveseike, O.; Lopez, M.; Alvarez-Ordonez, Avelino; Prieto, Maria Luz; Research Council of Norway; INIA, Spain; Foundation for Levy on Foods; Norwegian Research Fees Fund for Agricultural Goods; et al. (Teagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Ireland, 30/12/2016)
      Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic data from 12 strains of Escherichia coli were collected, including carbon source utilisation profiles, ribotypes, sequencing data of the 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed region (ITS) and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic profiles. The objectives were to compare several identification systems for E. coli and to develop and test a polyphasic taxonomic approach using the four methodologies combined for the sub-typing of O157 and non-O157 E. coli. The nucleotide sequences of the 16S–23S rRNA ITS regions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and compared with reference data available at the GenBank database using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) . Additional information comprising the utilisation of carbon sources, riboprint profiles and FT-IR spectra was also collected. The capacity of the methods for the identification and typing of E. coli to species and subspecies levels was evaluated. Data were transformed and integrated to present polyphasic hierarchical clusters and relationships. The study reports the use of an integrated scheme comprising phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic information (carbon source profile, sequencing of the 16S–23S rRNA ITS, ribotyping and FT-IR spectroscopy) for a more precise characterisation and identification of E. coli. The results showed that identification of E. coli strains by each individual method was limited mainly by the extension and quality of reference databases. On the contrary, the polyphasic approach, whereby heterogeneous taxonomic data were combined and weighted, improved the identification results, gave more consistency to the final clustering and provided additional information on the taxonomic structure and phenotypic behaviour of strains, as shown by the close clustering of strains with similar stress resistance patterns.
    • A Comprehensive Review on Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Meat Products

      Domínguez, Rubén; Pateiro, Mirian; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Barba, Francisco J.; Zhang, Wangang; Lorenzo, José M. (MDPI AG, 2019-09-25)
      Meat and meat products are a fundamental part of the human diet. The protein and vitamin content, as well as essential fatty acids, gives them an appropriate composition to complete the nutritional requirements. However, meat constituents are susceptible to degradation processes. Among them, the most important, after microbial deterioration, are oxidative processes, which affect lipids, pigments, proteins and vitamins. During these reactions a sensory degradation of the product occurs, causing consumer rejection. In addition, there is a nutritional loss that leads to the formation of toxic substances, so the control of oxidative processes is of vital importance for the meat industry. Nonetheless, despite lipid oxidation being widely investigated for decades, the complex reactions involved in the process, as well as the different pathways and factors that influenced them, make that lipid oxidation mechanisms have not yet been completely understood. Thus, this article reviews the fundamental mechanisms of lipid oxidation, the most important oxidative reactions, the main factors that influence lipid oxidation, and the routine methods to measure compounds derived from lipid oxidation in meat.
    • Confirmation of brand identity of a Trappist beer by mid-infrared spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis

      Engel, J.; Blanchet, L.; Buydens, L.M.C.; Downey, Gerard; European Union (Elsevier, 2012)
      Authentication of foods is of importance both to consumers and producers for e.g. confidence in label descriptions and brand protection respectively. The authentication of beers has received limited attention and in most cases only small data sets were analysed. In this study, Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FT-IR ATR) spectroscopy was applied to a set of 267 beers (53 different brands) to confirm claimed identity for samples of a single beer brand based on their spectral profiles. Skewness-adjusted robust principal component analysis (ROBPCA) was deployed to detect outliers in the data. Subsequently, extended canonical variates analysis (ECVA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the data while simultaneously achieving maximum class separation. Finally, the reduced data were used as inputs to various linear and non-linear classifiers. Work focused on the specific identification of Rochefort 8º (a Trappist beer) and both direct and indirect (using an hierarchical approach) identification strategies were studied. For the classification problems Rochefort versus non-Rochefort, Rochefort 8º versus non-Rochefort 8º and Rochefort 8º versus Rochefort 6º and 10º, correct prediction abilities of 93.8%, 93.3% and 97.3% respectively were achieved.
    • Correlating Volatile Lipid Oxidation Compounds with Consumer Sensory Data in Dairy Based Powders during Storage

      Clarke, Holly J.; O’Sullivan, Maurice G.; Kerry, Joseph P.; Kilcawley, Kieran; Teagasc Walsh Scholarship Programme; 2016071 (MDPI AG, 2020-04-20)
      Lipid oxidation (LO) is a recognised problem in dairy powders due to the formation of volatile odour compounds that can negatively impact sensory perception. Three commercial dairy powders, fat-filled whole milk powder (FFWMP), skim milk powder (SMP), and infant milk formula (IMF), stored under different conditions (21 °C, 37 °C, or 25 °C with 50% humidity), were evaluated by consumer acceptance studies, ranked descriptive sensory analysis, and LO volatile profiling using headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME GCMS) over 16 weeks. Significant (p = 0.001) differences in the concentration of LO compounds and sensory perception were evident between sample types in the different storage conditions. The sensory acceptance scores for FFWMP and SMP remained stable throughout storage in all conditions, despite the increased perception of some LO products. The IMF sample was perceived negatively in each storage condition and at each time point. Overall increases in hexanal, heptanal, and pentanal correlated with “painty”, “oxidised”, “cooked”, and “caramelised” attributes in all samples. The concentration of some LO volatiles in the IMF was far in excess of those in FFWMP and SMP. High levels of LO volatiles in IMF were presumably due to the addition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the formulation.
    • A Cross-Cultural Evaluation of Liking and Perception of Salted Butter Produced from Different Feed Systems

      C. Garvey, Emer; Sander, Thorsten; O’Callaghan, Tom F.; Drake, MaryAnne; Fox, Shelley; G. O’Sullivan, Maurice; Kerry, Joseph P.; Kilcawley, Kieran; Department of Agriculture, Food amd the Marine; 14F 812 (MDPI, 2020-11-28)
      Perception and liking among Irish, German and USA consumers of salted butter produced from different feed systems—outdoor grass (FS-GRSS), grass/clover (FS-CLVR), and indoor concentrate (FS-TMR)—was investigated. A consumer study was conducted in all three countries. Irish and German assessors participated in ranking descriptive analysis (RDA), whereas descriptive analysis (DA) was carried out by a trained panel in the USA. Volatile analysis was conducted to identify differences in aroma compounds related to cow diet. Overall, there was no significant difference in overall liking of the butters, among USA, German and Irish consumers, although cross-cultural preferences were evident. Sensory attribute differences based on cow diet were evident across the three countries, as identified by German and Irish assessors and trained USA panelists, which are likely influenced by familiarity. The abundance of specific volatile aromatic compounds, especially some aldehydes and ketones, were significantly impacted by the feed system and may also contribute to some of the perceived sensory attribute differences in these butters.
    • Current Trends in Proteomic Advances for Food Allergen Analysis

      López-Pedrouso, María; Lorenzo, José M.; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Franco, Daniel; Programa Iberoamericano de Ciencia y Tecnología para el Desarrollo; Axencia Galega de Innovación, Xunta de Galicia, Spain; 119RT0568; IN607A2019/01 (MDPI AG, 2020-08-25)
      Food allergies are a global food challenge. For correct food labelling, the detection and quantification of allergens are necessary. However, novel product formulations and industrial processes produce new scenarios, which require much more technological developments. For this purpose, OMICS technologies, especially proteomics, seemed to be relevant in this context. This review summarises the current knowledge and studies that used proteomics to study food allergens. In the case of the allergenic proteins, a wide variety of isoforms, post-translational modifications and other structural changes during food processing can increase or decrease the allergenicity. Most of the plant-based food allergens are proteins with biological functions involved in storage, structure, and plant defence. The allergenicity of these proteins could be increased by the presence of heavy metals, air pollution, and pesticides. Targeted proteomics like selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) have been very useful, especially in the case of gluten from wheat, rye and barley, and allergens from lentil, soy, and fruit. Conventional 1D and 2-DE immunoblotting have been further widely used. For animal-based food allergens, the widely used technologies are 1D and 2-DE immunoblotting followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF, and more recently LC-MS/MS, which is becoming useful to assess egg, fish, or milk allergens. The detection and quantification of allergenic proteins using mass spectrometry-based proteomics are promising and would contribute to greater accuracy, therefore improving consumer information.
    • Detection and quantification of apple adulteration in diluted and sulphited strawberry and raspberry purées using visible and near infrared spectroscopy

      Downey, Gerard; Kelly, J. Daniel; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (American Chemical Society, 2003)
      Adulteration of sulphited strawberry and raspberry purées by apple is a commercial problem. Strawberry (n=31) and raspberry (n=30) purées were prepared from Irish-grown fruit and adulterated at levels of 10-75% w/w using cooking apples. Visible and near infrared transflectance spectra were recorded using a 0.1 mm sample thickness. Classification and quantification models were developed using raw and scatter-corrected and/or derivatised spectral data. Classification as pure strawberry or raspberry was attempted using soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA). The best models used spectral data in the wavelength ranges 400-1098 nm (strawberry) and 750-1098 nm (raspberry) and produced total correct classification rates of 75% (strawberry) and 95% (raspberry). Quantification of apple content was performed using partial least squares (PLS) regression. Lowest predictive errors obtained were 11.3% (raspberry) and 9.0% (strawberry). These results were obtained using spectral data in the wavelength ranges 400-1880 and 1100-1880 nm respectively. These results suggest minimum detection levels of apple in soft fruit purées of approximately 25% and 20% w/w for raspberry and strawberry respectively.
    • Detection of adulteration in fresh and frozen beefburger products by beef offal using mid-infrared ATR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

      Zhao, Ming; Downey, Gerard; O'Donnell, Colm P.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Food Safety Authority of Ireland (Elsevier, 17/10/2013)
      A series of authentic and offal-adulterated beefburger samples was produced. Authentic product (36 samples) comprised either only lean meat and fat (higher quality beefburgers) or lean meat, fat, rusk and water (lower quality product). Offal adulterants comprised heart, liver, kidney and lung. Adulterated formulations (46 samples) were produced using a D-optimal experimental design. Fresh and frozen-then-thawed samples were modelled, separately and in combination, by a classification (partial least squares discriminant analysis) and class-modelling (soft independent modelling of class analogy) approach. With the former, 100% correct classification accuracies were obtained separately for fresh and frozen-then-thawed material. Separate class-models for fresh and frozen-then-thawed samples exhibited high sensitivities (0.94 to 1.0) but lower specificities (0.33 – 0.80 for fresh samples and 0.41 – 0.87 for frozen-then-thawed samples). When fresh and frozen-then-thawed samples were modelled together, sensitivity remained 1.0 but specificity ranged from 0.29 to 0.91. Results indicate a role for this technique in monitoring beefburger compliance to label.
    • Detection of offal adulteration in beefburgers using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy and multivariate modelling

      Zhao, Ming; O'Donnell, Colm P.; Downey, Gerard; Food Safety Authority of Ireland; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (IM Publications, 2013)
      The main aim of this study was to develop a rapid and reliable tool using near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy to confirm beefburger authenticity in the context of offal (kidney, liver, heart and lung) adulteration. An experimental design was used to develop beefburger formulations to simultaneously maximise the variable space describing offal-adulterated samples and minimise the number of experiments required. Authentic (n = 36) and adulterated (n = 46) beefburger samples were produced using these formulations. Classification models (partial least squares discriminant analysis, PLS1-DA) and class-modelling tools (soft independent modelling of class analogy, SIMCA) were developed using raw and pre-treated NIR reflectance spectra (850-1098 nm wavelength range) to detect authentic and adulterated beefburgers in (1) fresh, (2) frozen-then-thawed and (3) fresh or frozen-then-thawed states. In the case of authentic samples, the best PLS1-DA models achieved 100% correct classification for fresh, frozen-then-thawed and fresh or frozen-then-thawed samples. SIMCA models correctly identified all the fresh samples but not all the frozen-then-thawed and fresh or frozen-then-thawed samples. For the adulterated samples, PLS1-DA models correctly classified 95.5% of fresh, 91.3% of frozen-then-thawed and 88.9% of fresh or frozen-then-thawed beefburgers. SIMCA models exhibited specificity values of 1 for both fresh and frozen-then-thawed samples, 0.99 for fresh or frozen-then-thawed samples; sensitivity values of 1, 0.88 and 0.97 were obtained for fresh, frozen-then-thawed and fresh or frozen-then-thawed products respectively. Quantitative models (PLS1 regression) using both 850-1098 nm and 1100-2498 nm wavelength ranges were developed to quantify (1) offal adulteration and (2) added fat in adulterated beefburgers, both fresh and frozen-then-thawed. Models predicted added fat in fresh samples with acceptable accuracy (RMSECV = 2.0; RPD = 5.9); usefully-accurate predictions of added fat in frozen-then-thawed samples were not obtained nor was prediction of total offal possible in either sample form.
    • Development of a novel bulk packaging system for retail cuts of meat

      Allen, Paul; Doherty, Alice M.; Isdell, Emer (Teagasc, 1999-03)
      Meat colour is an important criterion in the appeal of meat to consumers at the point of sale. The bright red colour of fresh beef and lamb and the pinkish colour of fresh pork are due to the oxygenation of the myoglobin pigment when the meat is exposed to air. However, exposure to air over several days causes irreversible browning and rejection of the meat by consumers. The gaseous environment in which retail cuts are stored is therefore critical to ensure a good colour over the display life. Existing packaging systems do not have a sufficiently long storage life for the additional time required for exports from Ireland to the UK or continental Europe. The objective of this project was to develop a bulk packaging system for retail cuts that would have a sufficient shelf life to be used by the Irish industry to export retail ready cuts. In conclusion, a packaging system has been developed on a laboratory scale which is capable of extending the storage life of some beef cuts, lamb loin chops and pork loin chops. The display life of these after storage is comparable to fresh cuts. In order for this system to be commercialised it would have to be shown to work on a larger scale in a production environment.
    • Development of Organic Breads and Confectionery

      Gallagher, Eimear; Keehan, Denise; Butler, Francis; Downey, Gerard (Teagasc, 01/07/2005)
      In recent years, concern for the environment and consumer dissatisfaction with conventional food has led to growing interest in organic farming and food. The demand has also been fuelled by highly-publicised food scares. Food safety and genetic modification issues have led some consumers to opt for organic food as a safer alternative. Recently, there has been a significant increase in the number of launches of organic bakery products in Ireland. As a result, there is an increased need to identify suitable organic bakery ingredients for use in bread and confectionery formulations. However, only a limited number of scientific studies on the physical, chemical and functional properties of organic flours and ingredients exist. The effects of commonly-used ingredients in baking, i.e. organic improvers and fats, on the baking characteristics of organic products have not yet been reported and little is known about the influence of approved additives that may be beneficial to organic baking. Arising from these gaps in the knowledge base on the use of organic flours and ingredients, the objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical, rheological and baking characteristics of white, wholemeal and confectionery organic flours and to assess the baking potential of organic bakery ingredients, in particular improvers, fats and additives. Ingredients and baked goods were compared to non-organic controls.
    • Development of organic breads and confectionery

      Gallagher, Eimear; Keehan, Denise; Butler, Francis (Teagasc, 2005-07)
      Recently, there has been a significant increase in the number of launches of organic bakery products in Ireland. As a result, there is an increased need to identify suitable organic bakery ingredients for use in bread and confectionery formulations. However, only a limited number of scientific studies on the physical, chemical and functional properties of organic flours and ingredients exist. The effects of commonly-used ingredients in baking, i.e. organic improvers and fats, on the baking characteristics of organic products have not yet been reported and little is known about the influence of approved additives that may be beneficial to organic baking. Arising from these gaps in the knowledge base on the use of organic flours and ingredients, the objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical, rheological and baking characteristics of white, wholemeal and confectionery organic flours and to assess the baking potential of organic bakery ingredients, in particular improvers, fats and additives. Ingredients and baked goods were compared to non-organic controls.
    • Dietary Compounds Influencing the Sensorial, Volatile and Phytochemical Properties of Bovine Milk

      Clarke, Holly J.; Griffin, Carol; Rai, Dilip K.; O’Callaghan, Tom F.; O’Sullivan, Maurice G.; Kerry, Joseph P.; Kilcawley, Kieran N.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 2016071 (MDPI AG, 2019-12-19)
      The main aim of this study was to evaluate the volatile profile, sensory perception, and phytochemical content of bovine milk produced from cows fed on three distinct feeding systems, namely grass (GRS), grass/clover (CLV), and total mixed ration (TMR). Previous studies have identified that feed type can influence the sensory perception of milk directly via the transfer of volatile aromatic compounds, or indirectly by the transfer of non-volatile substrates that act as precursors for volatile compounds. In the present study, significant differences were observed in the phytochemical profile of the different feed and milk samples. The isoflavone formonoetin was significantly higher in CLV feed samples, but higher in raw GRS milk, while other smaller isoflavones, such as daidzein, genistein, and apigenin were highly correlated to raw CLV milk. This suggests that changes in isoflavone content and concentration in milk relate to diet, but also to metabolism in the rumen. This study also found unique potential volatile biomarkers in milk (dimethyl sulfone) related to feeding systems, or significant differences in the concentration of others (toluene, p-cresol, ethyl and methyl esters) based on feeding systems. TMR milk scored significantly higher for hay-like flavor and white color, while GRS and CLV milk scored significantly higher for a creamy color. Milk samples were easily distinguishable by their volatile profile based on feeding system, storage time, and pasteurization.
    • Discrimination of five Greek red grape varieties according to the anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin profiles of their skins and seeds

      Kyraleou, Maria; Kallithraka, Stamatina; Gkanidi, Eugenia; Koundouras, Stefanos; Mannion, David T.; Kilcawley, Kieran; State Scholarships Foundation of Greece (Elsevier BV, 2020-09)
      The knowledge of grapes phenolic content is proven to be critical for the vinification process and the improvement of wine quality. This study was undertaken to determine the phenolic composition and to employ the phenolic profile as a varietal discrimination tool in five Greek red grape varieties. Ninety grape samples from two seasons (2017 and 2018) were analyzed after extraction with organic solvents. Their proanthocyanidin profile, expressed as percentages of flavan-3-ols, was determined in both skins and seeds by employing phloroglucinolysis followed by HPLC-UV and MS detection, and anthocyanin profile was identified only in the skin extracts by HPLC-UV. Significant differences were observed in proanthocyanidin and anthocyanin profiles of skin extracts between the samples of different varieties, but not in seeds. (-)-Epicatechin was the main subunit in Mandilaria, Kotsifali, Agiorgitiko and Xinomavro grapes while (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Mavrotragano. Malvidin-3-O-glucoside was the predominant pigment in all grape samples analyzed with the exception of Kotsifali skin extracts, where peonidin-3-O-glucoside was the most abundant anthocyanin. In addition, Mavrotragano skin extracts were the richest in delphinidin and petunidin-3-O-glucosides, while Agiorgitiko and Xinomavro contained the highest amount of malvidin-3-O-glucoside. The results underline the significance of the skin phenolic composition as a tool for the discrimination of the Greek red grape varieties.