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dc.contributor.authorNaranjo-Lucena, Amalia*
dc.contributor.authorMunita, Maria P*
dc.contributor.authorMartinez-Ibeas, Ana M*
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, Guy*
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Gerard*
dc.contributor.authorCasey, Micheal*
dc.contributor.authorGood, Barbara*
dc.contributor.authorSayers, Riona*
dc.contributor.authorMulcahy, Grace*
dc.contributor.authorZintl, Annetta*
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-11T11:22:28Z
dc.date.available2018-10-11T11:22:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-29
dc.identifier.citationNaranjo-Lucena A, Munita Corbalán MP, Martínez-Ibeas AM, McGrath G, Murray G, Casey M, Good B, Sayers R, Mulcahy G, Zintl A. Spatial patterns of Fasciola hepatica and Calicophoron daubneyi infections in ruminants in Ireland and modelling of C. daubneyi infection. Parasites & Vectors 2018;11(1):531; doi 10.1186/s13071-018-3114-zen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/1602
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Fasciola hepatica has always represented a threat to Irish livestock because the Irish climate is highly suitable for the main local intermediate host of the parasite, the snail Galba truncatula. The recent clinical emergence of infections due to Calicophoron daubneyi has raised the question of whether the two parasites, which share a niche during part of their life-cycles, interact in some way. Here, we used geographical information systems (GIS) to analyse the distribution of both parasites in cattle and sheep. We also developed the first predictive model of paramphistomosis in Ireland. Results Our results indicated that, in cattle, liver fluke infection is less common than rumen fluke infection and does not exhibit the same seasonal fluctuations. Overall, we found that cattle had a higher likelihood of being infected with rumen fluke than sheep (OR = 3.134, P < 0.01). In addition, infection with one parasite increased the odds of infection with the other in both host species. Rumen fluke in cattle showed the highest spatial density of infection. Environmental variables such as soil drainage, land cover and habitat appeared to be the most important risk factors for C. daubneyi infection, followed by rainfall and vegetation. Overall the risk of infection with this parasite was predicted to be higher in the west of the country. Conclusions This study shows differences between the infection rates and spatial patterns of bovine and ovine infections with F. hepatica and C. daubneyi in Ireland. Whether the reasons for this are due to susceptibility, exposure and/or management factors is yet to be determined. Furthermore, the rumen fluke model indicates distinct risk factors and predicted distribution to those of F. hepatica, suggesting potential biological differences between both parasite species.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the European Union Horizon 2020 programme (PARAGONE: vaccines for animal parasites. H2020-EU.3.2. SOCIETAL CHALLENGES, under grant agreement No 635408), who provided funding for training and software access used in the analysis. The Department of Agriculture Food and the Marine - Research Stimulus Fund though the Flukeless Research Project (under project no 13/S/405), provided data employed in the modelling process.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBiomed Centralen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesParasites & Vectors;vol 11
dc.subjectCalicophoron daubneyien_US
dc.subjectFasciola hepaticaen_US
dc.subjectco-infectionen_US
dc.subjectKernel densityen_US
dc.subjectMachine Learningen_US
dc.subjectRisk factorsen_US
dc.subjectRisk mappingen_US
dc.subjectPredictionen_US
dc.titleSpatial patterns of Fasciola hepatica and Calicophoron daubneyi infections in ruminants in Ireland and modelling of C. daubneyi infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2018-09-30T03:55:05Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s).
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-3114-z
dc.contributor.sponsorEuropean Unionen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Irelanden_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber635408)en_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber13/S/405en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-11T11:22:28Z


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