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dc.contributor.authorMoloney, Aidan
dc.contributor.authorO'Riordan, Edward
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, O.
dc.contributor.authorMonahan, F. J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-04T12:07:50Z
dc.date.available2019-02-04T12:07:50Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-09
dc.identifier.citationMoloney, A..P., O’Riordan, E..G., Schmidt, O., & Monahan, F..J. (2018). The fatty acid profile and stable isotope ratios of C and N of muscle from cattle that grazed grass or grass/clover pastures before slaughter and their discriminatory potential, Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research, 57(1), 84-94. doi: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijafr-2018-0009en_US
dc.identifier.issn2009-9029
dc.identifier.issn0791-6833 (print)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/1653
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractConsumption of grazed pasture compared to concentrates results in higher concentrations, in beef muscle, of fatty acids considered to be beneficial to human health. Little information is available on the influence of the type of grazed forage. Our objectives were to determine 1) the effect of inclusion of white clover in a grazing sward on the fatty acid profile of beef muscle and 2) the potential of the fatty acid profile and stable isotope ratios of C and N to discriminate between beef from cattle that grazed grass-only or grass/clover swards before slaughter. A total of 28 spring-born Charolais steers grazed from March until slaughter in October, either on a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) sward that received approximately 220 kg N/ha or a perennial ryegrass–white clover (Trifolium repens L.) sward that received 50 kg N/ha. The longissimus muscle from cattle finished on grass/clover had a higher (P < 0.05) proportion of C18:2 and C18:3 but a lower (P < 0.05) proportion of conjugated linoleic acid and δ15N value than animals finished on the grass-only sward. Discriminant analysis using the fatty acid data showed that, after cross-validation, 80.7% of grass/clover and 86.1% of grass-only muscle samples were correctly classified. Discriminant analysis using the stable isotope data showed that, after cross-validation, 95.7% of grass/clover and 86.5% of grass-only muscle samples were correctly classified. Inclusion of white clover in pasture is likely to have little effect on healthiness of meat for consumers. However, changes in fatty acids and stable isotopes can be used to distinguish between grass/clover-fed and grass-only-fed beef.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTeagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Irelanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIrish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research;vol 57
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectBeefen_US
dc.subjectDiscriminationen_US
dc.subjectFatty acidsen_US
dc.subjectGrass/Cloveren_US
dc.subjectStable isotopesen_US
dc.titleThe fatty acid profile and stable isotope ratios of C and N of muscle from cattle that grazed grass or grass/clover pastures before slaughter and their discriminatory potentialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1515/ijafr-2018-0009
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-04T12:07:50Z


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