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dc.contributor.authorHyland, John J.
dc.contributor.authorCrehan, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorColantuono, Fedele
dc.contributor.authorMacken-Walsh, Aine
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-10T16:14:39Z
dc.date.available2020-06-10T16:14:39Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-13
dc.identifier.citationHyland, J., Crehan, P., Colantuono, F. and Macken-Walsh, Á. The Significance of Short Food Supply Chains: Trends and Bottlenecks from the SKIN Thematic Network. Studies in Agricultural Economics, 2019, 121(2), 59-66. doi: https://doi.org/10.7896/j.1904en_US
dc.identifier.issn1418-2106
dc.identifier.issn2063-0476
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/1968
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractShort Food Supply Chains (SFSCs) are central to the alternative food movement discourse. SFSCs are based upon the interrelations among actors who are directly involved in the production, processing, distribution, and consumption of food products. They depend upon actors mobilising resources of various kinds: skills; knowledge; labour; capital; buildings etc. External factors such as policies and regulations can also encourage the creation of these shorter chains. The development of SFSCs can still be hindered by a range of other factors. Nevertheless, bottlenecks can be overcome via the sharing of information on successful SFSCs through the dissemination of Good Practices between various actors and territories. The Short Supply Chain Knowledge and Innovation (SKIN) project uses the term ‘good’ rather than ‘best’ practice to draw attention to the subjective lens through which a practice is ultimately evaluated by an end-user. This paper first outlines the many issues that confront SFSC actors which represent bottlenecks to the adoption of ‘Good Practices’. It then documents the Good Practices collected as part of the SKIN project as tangible examples of how SFSCs overcome such challenges. Lessons learnt from project highlights are subsequently assessed in an effort to mitigate and offer solutions to the challenges associated with SFSCs. The paper demonstrates the considerable latent potential inherent to SFSCs. However, in order for the agricultural sector to realise the full promise of short supply chains it must first be conscious of the issues pertinent to their prosperity.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherResearch Institute of Agricultural Economicsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStudies in Agricultural Economics;Vol. 121 (2)
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectshort food supply chainen_US
dc.subjectgood practiceen_US
dc.subjectchallengesen_US
dc.subjecttrendsen_US
dc.subjectbarriersen_US
dc.subjectforesighten_US
dc.titleThe Significance of Short Food Supply Chains: Trends and Bottlenecks from the SKIN Thematic Networken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7896/j.1904
dc.contributor.sponsorEuropean Unionen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber728055en_US
dc.source.volume121
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage59-66
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-10T16:14:39Z


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