• Emulsifying properties of hemp proteins: Effect of isolation technique

      Dapčević-Hadnađev, Tamara; Dizdar, Manda; Pojić, Milica; Krstonošić, Veljko; Zychowski, Lisa M.; Hadnađev, Miroslav; Provincial Secretariat for Higher Education and Scientific Research, Republic of Serbia; European Union; 142-451-2458/2018-01/02; 692276 (Elsevier, 2018-12-03)
      Hemp protein was isolated from hemp seed meal using two different isolation procedures: alkali extraction/isoelectric precipitation (HPI) and micellization (HMI). The ability of these proteins to form and stabilize 10% (w/w) sunflower oil-in-water emulsions (at pH = 3.0) was studied at three different concentrations, 0.25, 0.75 and 1.5% (w/w), by monitoring emulsion droplet size distribution, microstructural and morphological properties, rheological behaviour and stability against flocculation, coalescence and creaming. In addition, hemp proteins were analysed for water solubility, denaturation degree and surface/interfacial activity. HMI protein, which was found to be less denatured after isolation, exhibited higher solubility and slightly higher surface/interfacial activity than HPI protein. HMI emulsions possessed a smaller volume mean droplet diameter (d4,3 = 1.92–3.42 μm in 2% SDS) than HPI emulsions (d4,3 = 2.25–15.77 μm in 2% SDS). While HMI stabilized emulsions were characterized with individual droplets covered by protein film, both confocal laser scanning microscopy and flocculation indices indicated occurrence of bridging flocculation in HPI stabilized emulsions. Protein aggregation, which induced flocculation of the droplets, contributed to higher apparent viscosity of HPI stabilized emulsions compared to HMI stabilized emulsions. Interestingly, emulsions stabilized with 1.5% (w/w) HPI exhibited much better creaming and coalescence stability than other emulsions due to the formation of a weak transient network of floccules and higher continuous phase viscosity which both suppressed the movement of the droplets.
    • Phytosterol crystallisation within bulk and dispersed triacylglycerol matrices as influenced by oil droplet size and low molecular weight surfactant addition

      Zychowski, Lisa M.; Logan, Amy; Augustin, Mary Ann; Kelly, Alan L.; O'Mahony, James A.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Auty, Mark; Teagasc; Australian Research Council; 6412; et al. (Elsevier, 2018-04-12)
      Phytosterols can lower LDL-cholesterol and are frequently used by the functional food industry. However, little is known regarding how phytosterol crystallisation can be controlled, despite solubilised phytosterols having improved bioaccessibility. This study investigates phytosterol crystallisation in bulk milk fat and in model dairy emulsion systems at two average droplet sizes, 1.0 and 0.2 µm. The effect of lecithin and monoacylglycerol addition on phytosterol crystallisation for both emulsion and bulk systems was also evaluated. Results demonstrated that lecithin and monoacylglycerols enrichment into the bulk system minimised phytosterol crystallisation. However, in emulsions, phytosterol crystallisation was mainly influenced by decreasing the droplet size. Smaller emulsion droplets containing lecithin showed the greatest potential for decreasing phytosterol crystallisation and had improved physicochemical stability. This information can be employed by the functional food industry to minimise phytosterol crystallisation and possibly improve bioaccessibility.