• Determination of the presence of pathogens and anthelmintic drugs in raw milk and raw milk cheeses from small scale producers in Ireland

      Lourenco, Antonio; Fraga-Corral, Maria; De Colli, Lorenzo; Moloney, Mary; Danaher, Martin; Jordan, Kieran; Depart of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 15/F/690 (Elsevier, 2020-04-03)
      This aim of this study was to assess the microbiological and anthelmintic drug residue risks associated with raw milk used for cheesemaking and raw milk cheese, over an 18-month period. Samples of raw milk, milk filters, curd and cheese from nine raw milk artisan cheese producers in the south of Ireland were tested. Numbers of presumptive Bacillus cereus group, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes were determined. The determination of anthelmintic drug residues, including benzimidazoles, flukicides, macrocyclic lactone (avermectin and milbemycins), levamisole and morantel was also performed. Neither L. monocytogenes, nor Salmonella spp. were detected in any of the samples tested and no anthelmintic drug residues were detected. Only one of the samples did not conform with regulatory numbers for other bacteria. This survey has shown a good microbiological and residue quality (and low risk) of the raw milk cheese and raw milk used for raw milk cheese produced in Ireland. Moreover, it has shown the importance of frequent assessment of raw milk used for cheesemaking and for raw milk cheese, as it allows the identification of potential problems facilitating resolution of these issues before they cause any public health threat.
    • Effect of high pressure processing on the safety, shelf life and quality of raw milk

      Stratakos, Alexandros Ch.; Inguglia, Elena Sofia; Linton, Mark; Tollerton, Joan; Murphy, Liam; Corcionivoschi, Nicolae; Koidis, Anastasios; Tiwari, Brijesh K (Elsevier, 2019-01-14)
      High pressure processing (HPP) was investigated as an alternative to standard raw milk processing. Different pressure levels (400–600 MPa) and exposure times (1–5 min) were tested against artificially inoculated pathogenic E. coli, Salmonella and L. monocytogenes. HPP effectively inactivated bacterial concentration by 5 log CFU/ml. The most effective HPP conditions in terms of pathogen reduction were subsequently utilised to determine the effect of pressure on microbiological shelf life, particle size and colour of milk during refrigerated storage. Results were compared to pasteurised and raw milk. HPP (600 MPa for 3 min) also significantly reduced the total viable counts, Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. in milk thus prolonging the microbiological shelf life of milk by 1 week compared to pasteurised milk. Particle size distribution curves of raw, pasteurised and HPP milk, showed that raw and HPP milk had more similar casein and fat particle sizes compared to pasteurised milk. The results of this study show the possibility of using HPP to eliminate pathogens present in milk while maintaining key quality characteristics similar to those of raw milk.
    • Longitudinal Study of Two Irish Dairy Herds: Low Numbers of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157 and O26 Super-Shedders Identified

      Murphy, Brenda P.; McCabe, Evonne; Murphy, Mary; Buckley, James F.; Crowley, Dan; Fanning, Seamus; Duffy, Geraldine; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; 11/F/051 (Frontiers, 2016-11-18)
      A 12-month longitudinal study was undertaken on two dairy herds to ascertain the Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and O26 shedding status of the animals and its impact (if any) on raw milk. Cattle are a recognized reservoir for these organisms with associated public health and environmental implications. Animals shedding E. coli O157 at >10,000 CFU/g of feces have been deemed super-shedders. There is a gap in the knowledge regarding super-shedding of other STEC serogroups. A cohort of 40 lactating cows from herds previously identified as positive for STEC in a national surveillance project were sampled every second month between August, 2013 and July, 2014. Metadata on any potential super-shedders was documented including, e.g., age of the animal, number of lactations and days in lactation, nutritional condition, somatic cell count and content of protein in milk to assess if any were associated with risk factors for super-shedding. Recto-anal mucosal swabs (RAMS), raw milk, milk filters, and water samples were procured for each herd. The swabs were examined for E. coli O157 and O26 using a quantitative real time PCR method. Counts (CFU swab-1) were obtained from a standard calibration curve that related real-time PCR cycle threshold (Ct) values against the initial concentration of O157 or O26 in the samples. Results from Farm A: 305 animals were analyzed; 15 E. coli O157 (5%) were recovered, 13 were denoted STEC encoding either stx1 and/or stx2 virulence genes and 5 (2%) STEC O26 were recovered. One super-shedder was identified shedding STEC O26 (stx1&2). Farm B: 224 animals were analyzed; eight E. coli O157 (3.5%) were recovered (seven were STEC) and 9 (4%) STEC O26 were recovered. Three super-shedders were identified, one was shedding STEC O157 (stx2) and two STEC O26 (stx2). Three encoded the adhering and effacement gene (eae) and one isolate additionally encoded the haemolysin gene (hlyA). All four super-shedders were only super-shedding once during the 1-year sampling period. The results of this study show, low numbers of super-shedders in the herds examined, with high numbers of low and medium shedding. Although four super-shedding animals were identified, no STEC O157 or O26 were recovered from any of the raw milk, milk filter, or water samples. The authors conclude that this study highlights the need for further surveillance to assess the potential for environmental contamination and food chain security.