• Partitioning of starter bacteria and added exogenous enzyme activities between curd and whey during Cheddar cheese manufacture

      Doolan, I. A.; Nongonierma, Alice B.; Kilcawley, Kieran N; Wilkinson, M.G.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; 04/R&D/C/238 (Elsevier, 26/07/2013)
      Partitioning of starter bacteria and enzyme activities was investigated at different stages of Cheddar cheese manufacture using three exogenous commercial enzyme preparations added to milk or at salting. The enzyme preparations used were: Accelase AM317, Accelase AHC50, Accelerzyme CPG. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that AHC50 or AM317 consisted of permeabilised or dead cells and contained a range of enzyme activities. The CPG preparation contained only carboxypeptidase activity. Approximately 90% of starter bacteria cells partitioned with the curd at whey drainage. However, key enzyme activities partitioned with the bulk whey in the range of 22%–90%. An increased level of enzyme partitioning with the curd was observed for AHC50 which was added at salting, indicating that the mode of addition influenced partitioning. These findings suggest that further scope exists to optimise both bacterial and exogenous enzyme incorporation into cheese curd to accelerate ripening.
    • Paste structure and rheological properties of lotus seed starch–glycerin monostearate complexes formed by high-pressure homogenization

      Chen, Bingyan; Guo, Zebin; Zeng, Shaoxiao; Tian, Yuting; Miao, Song; Zheng, Baodong; National Natural Science Foundation of China; Scientific and Technological Innovation Team Support Plan of Institution of Higher Learning in Fujian Province; Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University of China; 31501485; et al. (Elsevier, 2017-10-31)
      Starch–lipid complexes were prepared using lotus seed starch (LS) and glycerin monostearate (GMS) via a high-pressure homogenization (HPH) process, and the effect of HPH on the paste structure and rheological properties of LS–GMS was investigated. Rapid Visco Analyser (RVA) profiles showed that HPH treatment inhibited the formation of the second viscosity peak of the LS–GMS paste, and the extent of this change was dependent on the level of homogenized pressure. Analysis of the size-exclusion chromatography, light microscopy, and low-field 1H nuclear magnetic resonance results revealed that high homogenized pressure (70–100 MPa) decreased molecular weight and size by degrading the branch structure of amylopectin; however, intact LS–GMS granules can optimize the network structure by filler–matrix interaction, which causes free water to transition into immobile water in the starch paste. The steady-shear results showed that the LS–GMS pastes presented non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior, with higher homogenized pressure producing a smaller hysteresis loop area. During the oscillation process, the LS–GMS pastes prepared at 100 MPa exhibited the lowest loss tangent values in all the complexes, indicating a stronger resistance to vibration.
    • Phages of non-dairy lactococci: isolation and characterization of ΦL47, a phage infecting the grass isolate Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris DPC6860

      Cavanagh, Daniel; Guinane, Caitriona M.; Neve, Horst; Coffey, Aidan; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia; Irish Dairy Levy Research Trust; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Frontiers, 13/01/2014)
      Lactococci isolated from non-dairy sources have been found to possess enhanced metabolic activity when compared to dairy strains. These capabilities may be harnessed through the use of these strains as starter or adjunct cultures to produce more diverse flavor profiles in cheese and other dairy products. To understand the interactions between these organisms and the phages that infect them, a number of phages were isolated against lactococcal strains of non-dairy origin. One such phage, ΦL47, was isolated from a sewage sample using the grass isolate L. lactis ssp. cremoris DPC6860 as a host. Visualization of phage virions by transmission electron microscopy established that this phage belongs to the family Siphoviridae and possesses a long tail fiber, previously unseen in dairy lactococcal phages. Determination of the lytic spectrum revealed a broader than expected host range, with ΦL47 capable of infecting 4 industrial dairy strains, including ML8, HP and 310, and 3 additional non-dairy isolates. Whole genome sequencing of ΦL47 revealed a dsDNA genome of 128, 546 bp, making it the largest sequenced lactococcal phage to date. In total, 190 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, and comparative analysis revealed that the predicted products of 117 of these ORFs shared greater than 50% amino acid identity with those of L. lactis phage Φ949, a phage isolated from cheese whey. Despite their different ecological niches, the genomic content and organization of ΦL47 and Φ949 are quite similar, with both containing 4 gene clusters oriented in different transcriptional directions. Other features that distinguish ΦL47 from Φ949 and other lactococcal phages, in addition to the presence of the tail fiber and the genome length, include a low GC content (32.5%) and a high number of predicted tRNA genes (8). Comparative genome analysis supports the conclusion that ΦL47 is a new member of the 949 lactococcal phage group which currently includes the dairy Φ949.
    • Phenotypic, fermentation characterization, and resistance mechanism analysis of bacteriophage-resistant mutants of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus isolated from traditional Chinese dairy products

      Deng, Kaibo; Fang, Wei; Zheng, Baodong; Miao, Song; Huo, Guicheng; International Technological Cooperation and Exchange Plan of Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University; National Natural Science Funds of China; Scientific and Technological Innovation Team Support Plan of Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University; KXGH17001; 31171717; et al. (Elsevier, 2017-12-21)
      Bacteriophage infection is a large factor in dairy industrial production failure on the basis of pure inoculation fermentation, and developing good commercial starter cultures from wild dairy products and improving the environmental vigor of starter cultures by enhancing their phage resistance are still the most effective solutions. Here we used a spontaneous isolation method to obtain bacteriophage-resistant mutants of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus strains that are used in traditional Chinese fermented dairy products. We analyzed their phenotypes, fermentation characteristics, and resistance mechanisms. The results showed that bacteriophage-insensitive mutants (BIM) BIM8 and BIM12 had high bacteriophage resistance while exhibiting fermentation and coagulation attributes that were as satisfying as those of their respective parent strains KLDS1.1016 and KLDS1.1028. According to the attachment receptor detection, mutants BIM8 and BIM12 exhibited reduced absorption to bacteriophage phiLdb compared with their respective bacteriophage-sensitive parent strains because of changes to the polysaccharides or teichoic acids connected to their peptidoglycan layer. Additionally, genes, including HSDR, HSDM, and HSDS, encoding 3 subunits of a type I restriction-modification system were identified in their respective parent strains. We also discovered that HSDR and HSDM were highly conserved but that HSDS was variable because it is responsible for the DNA specificity of the complex. The late lysis that occurred only in strain KLDS1.1016 and not in strain KLDS1.1028 suggests that the former and its mutant BIM8 also may have an activatable restriction-modification mechanism. We conclude that the L. bulgaricus BIM8 and BIM12 mutants have great potential in the dairy industry as starter cultures, and their phage-resistance mechanism was effective mainly due to the adsorption interference and restriction-modification system.
    • Physiological Gut Oxygenation Alters GLP‐1 Secretion from the Enteroendocrine Cell Line STC‐1

      Kondrashina, Alina; Papkovsky, Dmitri; Giblin, Linda; Enterprise Ireland; TC20130001 (Wiley, 29/09/2017)
      1 Scope Enteroendocrine cell lines are routinely assayed in simple buffers at ≈20% oxygen to screen foods for bioactives that boost satiety hormone levels. However, in vivo, enteroendocrine cells are exposed to different phases of food digestion and function at low oxygen concentration, ranging from 7.5% in the stomach to 0.5% in the colon–rectal junction. 2 Methods and results The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of physiologically relevant O2 concentrations of the gut on the production and secretion of the satiety hormone, glucagon‐like peptide 1 (GLP‐1), from the murine enteroendocrine cell line, secretin tumor cell line (STC‐1), in response to dairy macronutrients as they transit the gut. GLP‐1 exocytosis from STC‐1 cells is influenced by both oxygen concentration and by individual macronutrients. At low oxygen, STC‐1 cell viability is significantly improved for all macronutrient stimulations and cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels are dampened. GLP‐1 secretion from STC‐1 cells is influenced by both the phase of yogurt digestion and corresponding O2 concentration. Atmospheric oxygen at 4.5% combined with upper gastric digesta, which simulates ileum conditions, yields the highest GLP‐1 response. 3 Conclusion This demonstrates the importance of considering physiological oxygen levels and food digestion along gastrointestinal tract for reliable in vitro analysis of gut hormone secretion.
    • Phytosterol crystallisation within bulk and dispersed triacylglycerol matrices as influenced by oil droplet size and low molecular weight surfactant addition

      Zychowski, Lisa M.; Logan, Amy; Augustin, Mary Ann; Kelly, Alan L.; O'Mahony, James A.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Auty, Mark; Teagasc; Australian Research Council; 6412; et al. (Elsevier, 2018-04-12)
      Phytosterols can lower LDL-cholesterol and are frequently used by the functional food industry. However, little is known regarding how phytosterol crystallisation can be controlled, despite solubilised phytosterols having improved bioaccessibility. This study investigates phytosterol crystallisation in bulk milk fat and in model dairy emulsion systems at two average droplet sizes, 1.0 and 0.2 µm. The effect of lecithin and monoacylglycerol addition on phytosterol crystallisation for both emulsion and bulk systems was also evaluated. Results demonstrated that lecithin and monoacylglycerols enrichment into the bulk system minimised phytosterol crystallisation. However, in emulsions, phytosterol crystallisation was mainly influenced by decreasing the droplet size. Smaller emulsion droplets containing lecithin showed the greatest potential for decreasing phytosterol crystallisation and had improved physicochemical stability. This information can be employed by the functional food industry to minimise phytosterol crystallisation and possibly improve bioaccessibility.
    • Pilot-scale Production of Hydrolysates with Altered Bio-functionalities based on Thermally-denatured Whey Protein Isolate

      O'Loughlin, Ian B.; Murray, Brian A.; Fitzgerald, Richard J.; Brodkorb, Andre; Kelly, Philip M.; Enterprise Ireland; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; CC20080001 (Elsevier, 13/08/2013)
      Whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions (100 g L−1 protein) were subjected to a heat-treatment of 80 °C for 10 min. Unheated and heat-treated WPI solutions were hydrolysed with Corolase® PP at pilot-scale to either 5 or 10% degree of hydrolysis (DH). Hydrolysates were subsequently processed via cascade membrane fractionation using 0.14 μm, and 30, 10, 5 and 1 kDa cut-off membranes. The compositional and molecular mass distribution profiles of the substrate hydrolysates and membrane processed fractions were determined. Whole and fractionated hydrolysates were assayed for both angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and ferrous chelating capabilities. A strong positive correlation (P < 0.01) was established between the average molecular mass of the test samples and the concentration needed to chelate 50% of the iron (CC50) in solution. The lowest ACE inhibition concentration (IC50 = 0.23 g L−1 protein) was determined for the 1 kDa permeate of the heat-treated 10% DH hydrolysate
    • Polymorphisms in bovine immune genes and their associations with somatic cell count and milk production in dairy cattle

      Beecher, Christine; Daly, Mairead; Childs, Stuart; Berry, Donagh P.; Magee, David A; McCarthy, Tommie V; Giblin, Linda (Biomed Central, 05/11/2010)
      Background: Mastitis, an inflammation of the mammary gland, is a major source of economic loss on dairy farms. The aim of this study was to quantify the associations between two previously identified polymorphisms in the bovine toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1) genes and mammary health indictor traits in (a) 246 lactating dairy cow contemporaries representing five breeds from one research farm and (b) 848 Holstein-Friesian bulls that represent a large proportion of the Irish dairy germplasm. To expand the study, a further 14 polymorphisms in immune genes were included for association studies in the bull population. Results: TLR4-2021 associated (P < 0.05) with both milk protein and fat percentage in late lactation (P < 0.01) within the cow cohort. No association was observed between this polymorphism and either yield or composition of milk within the bull population. CXCR1-777 significantly associated (P < 0.05) with fat yield in the bull population and tended to associate (P < 0.1) with somatic cell score (SCS) in the cows genotyped. CD14-1908 A allele was found to associate with increased (P < 0.05) milk fat and protein yield and also tended to associate with increased (P < 0.1) milk yield. A SERPINA1 haplotype with superior genetic merit for milk protein yield and milk fat percentage (P < 0.05) was also identified. Conclusion: Of the sixteen polymorphisms in seven immune genes genotyped, just CXCR1-777 tended to associate with SCS, albeit only in the on-farm study. The lack of an association between the polymorphisms with SCS in the Holstein-Friesian data set would question the potential importance of these variants in selection for improved mastitis resistance in the Holstein-Friesian cow.
    • Potential of cultivar and crop management to affect phytochemical content in winter-grown sprouting broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica)

      Reilly, Kim; Valverde, Juan; Finn, Leo; Rai, Dilip K.; Brunton, Nigel; Sorenson, Jens C; Sorenson, Hilmer; Gaffney, Michael; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; 06/NITAFRC6 (Wiley, 08/07/2013)
      BACKGROUND: Variety and crop management strategies affect the content of bioactive compounds (phenolics, flavonoids and glucosinolates) in green broccoli (calabrese) types, which are cultivated during summer and autumn in temperate European climates. Sprouting broccoli types are morphologically distinct and are grown over the winter season and harvested until early spring. Thus they show considerable potential for development as an import substitution crop for growers and consumers during the ‘hungry gap’ of early spring. The present study investigated the effect of variety and management practices on phytochemical content in a range of sprouting broccoli varieties. RESULTS: Yields were significantly higher in white sprouting broccoli varieties. Levels of phenolics and flavonoids were in the range 81.6-270.4 and 16.9–104.8 mg 100g -1 FW respectively depending on year and cultivar, and were highest in varieties TZ 5052, TZ 5055, Red Admiral and Improved White Sprouting. In-row spacing did not affect flavonoid content. Phenolic and flavonoid content generally increased with increasing floret maturity and levels were high in edible portions of the crop. Crop wastes (leaf and flower) contained 145.9-239.3 and 21.5–116.6 mg 100g -1 FW total phenolics and flavonoids respectively depending on cultivar, tissue and year. Climatic factors had a significant effect on phenolic and flavonoid content. Levels of total and some individual glucosinolates were higher in sprouting broccoli than in the green broccoli variety Ironman. CONCLUSION: Levels of total phenolics, flavonoids and glucosinolates are higher in sprouting than green broccoli types. Sprouting broccoli represents an excellent source of dietary bioactive compounds.
    • Prawn Shell Chitosan Has Anti-Obesogenic Properties, Influencing Both Nutrient Digestibility and Microbial Populations in a Pig Model

      Egan, Aine M.; Sweeney, Torres; Hayes, Maria; O'Doherty, John V.; Marine Institute; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; MFFRI/07/01 (PLOS, 04/12/2015)
      The potential of natural products to prevent obesity have been investigated, with evidence to suggest that chitosan has anti-obesity effects. The current experiment investigated the anti-obesity potential of prawn shell derived chitosan on a range of variables relevant to obesity in a pig model. The two dietary treatment groups included in this 63 day study were: T1) basal diet and T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group (70 ± 0.90 kg). The parameter categories which were assessed included: performance, nutrient digestibility, serum leptin concentrations, nutrient transporter and digestive enzyme gene expression and gut microbial populations. Pigs offered chitosan had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001), lower ileal digestibility of dry matter (DM), gross energy (GE) (P< 0.05) and reduced coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of gross energy and nitrogen (P<0.05) when compared to the basal group. Fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) gene expression was down-regulated in pigs offered chitosan (P = 0.05) relative to the basal diet. Serum leptin concentrations increased (P< 0.05) in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to pigs offered the basal diet. Fatness traits, back-fat depth (mm), fat content (kg), were significantly reduced while lean meat (%) was increased (P<0.05) in chitosan supplemented pigs. Pigs offered chitosan had decreased numbers of Firmicutes in the colon (P <0.05), and Lactobacillus spp. in both the caecum (P <0.05) and colon (P <0.001). Bifidobacteria populations were increased in the caecum of animals offered the chitosan diet (P <0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that prawn shell chitosan has potent anti-obesity/body weight control effects which are mediated through multiple biological systems in vivo.
    • Prebiotics from Seaweeds: An Ocean of Opportunity?

      Cherry, Paul; Yadav, Supriya; Strain, Conall R.; Allsopp, Philip J.; McSorley, Emeir; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Department of Agriculture Food and the Marine; Science Foundation Ireland; 13F511 (PREMARA) (MDPI, 2019-06-01)
      Abstract Seaweeds are an underexploited and potentially sustainable crop which offer a rich source of bioactive compounds, including novel complex polysaccharides, polyphenols, fatty acids, and carotenoids. The purported efficacies of these phytochemicals have led to potential functional food and nutraceutical applications which aim to protect against cardiometabolic and inflammatory risk factors associated with non-communicable diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and some cancers. Concurrent understanding that perturbations of gut microbial composition and metabolic function manifest throughout health and disease has led to dietary strategies, such as prebiotics, which exploit the diet-host-microbe paradigm to modulate the gut microbiota, such that host health is maintained or improved. The prebiotic definition was recently updated to “a substrate that is selectively utilised by host microorganisms conferring a health benefit”, which, given that previous discussion regarding seaweed prebiotics has focused upon saccharolytic fermentation, an opportunity is presented to explore how non-complex polysaccharide components from seaweeds may be metabolised by host microbial populations to benefit host health. Thus, this review provides an innovative approach to consider how the gut microbiota may utilise seaweed phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and carotenoids, and provides an updated discussion regarding the catabolism of seaweed-derived complex polysaccharides with potential prebiotic activity. Additional in vitro screening studies and in vivo animal studies are needed to identify potential prebiotics from seaweeds, alongside untargeted metabolomics to decipher microbial-derived metabolites from seaweeds. Furthermore, controlled human intervention studies with health-related end points to elucidate prebiotic efficacy are required.
    • Predicting beef carcass meat, fat and bone proportions from carcass conformation and fat scores or hindquarter dissection

      Conroy, S.B.; Drennan, Michael J; McGee, Mark; Keane, Michael G.; Kenny, David A.; Berry, Donagh P. (Cambridge University Press, 2009-10)
      Equations for predicting the meat, fat and bone proportions in beef carcasses using the European Union carcass classification scores for conformation and fatness, and hindquarter composition were developed and their accuracy was tested using data from 662 cattle. The animals included bulls, steers and heifers, and comprised of Holstein–Friesian, early- and late-maturing breeds x Holstein–Friesian, early-maturing X early-maturing, late-maturing X early-maturing and genotypes with 0.75 or greater late-maturing ancestry. Bulls, heifers and steers were slaughtered at 15, 20 and 24 months of age, respectively. The diet offered before slaughter includes grass silage only, grass or maize silage plus supplementary concentrates, or concentrates offered ad libitum plus 1 kg of roughage dry matter per head daily. Following the slaughter, carcasses were classified mechanically for conformation and fatness (scale 1 to 15), and the right side of each carcass was dissected into meat, fat and bone. Carcass conformation score ranged from 4.7 to 14.4, 5.4 to 10.9 and 2.0 to 12.0 for bulls, heifers and steers, respectively; the corresponding ranges for fat score were 2.7 to 11.5, 3.2 to 11.3 and 2.8 to 13.3. Prediction equations for carcass meat, fat and bone proportions were developed using multiple regression, with carcass conformation and fat score both included as continuous independent variables. In a separate series of analyses, the independent variable in the model was the proportion of the trait under investigation (meat, fat or bone) in the hindquarter. In both analyses, interactions between the independent variables and gender were tested. The predictive ability of the developed equations was assed using cross-validation on all 662 animals. Carcass classification scores accounted for 0.73, 0.67 and 0.71 of the total variation in carcass meat, fat and bone proportions, respectively, across all 662 animals. The corresponding values using hindquarter meat, fat and bone in the model were 0.93, 0.87 and 0.89, respectively. The bias of the prediction equations when applied across all animals was not different from zero, but bias did exist among some of the genotypes of animals present. In conclusion, carcass classification scores and hindquarter composition are accurate and efficient predictors of carcass meat, fat and bone proportions.
    • Predicting the eating quality of meat

      Mullen, Anne Maria; Murray, Brendan; Troy, Declan J.; European Union (Teagasc, 2000-12)
      A novel, water soluble protein fragment [1735Da] was isolated from beef striploin and characterised. As soluble components of the proteolytic system are easily extracted from muscle they may be suitable for routine factory analysis. This fragment originated from the important myofibrillar protein, troponin T and may serve as a tenderness indicator.
    • Prediction of cull cow carcass characteristics from live weight and body condition score measured pre slaughter

      Minchin, William; Buckley, Frank; Kenny, David A.; Keane, Michael G.; Shalloo, Laurence; O'Donovan, Michael (Teagasc, Oak Park, Carlow, Ireland, 2009)
      A study was conducted to provide information on the degree of carcass finish of Irish cull cows and to investigate the usefulness of live animal measurements for the prediction beef breeds (albeit with a moderate R2 value compared to the carcass weight prediction) using objective, non-intrusive and easily measured live animal measurements, should be of benefit to farmers finishing cull cows in Ireland. of cull cow carcass characteristics. Live weight (LW) and body condition score (BCS) were recorded on cows entering an Irish commercial slaughter facility between September and November, 2005. Data pertaining to sire breed, age and carcass characteristics were collected and subsequently collated for each cow. For analysis, cows (n = 2163) were subdivided into three breed categories: dairy breed sired by Holstein/ Friesian (FR), sired by early-maturing beef breeds (EM) and sired by late-maturing beef breeds (LM). The proportion of cows slaughtered at the desired (TARGET) carcass standard (cold carcass weight ≥ 272 kg, carcass conformation class ≥ P+ and carcass fat class ≥ 3) was low (on average 0.30), but did differ (P < 0.001) between the dairy and beef breed categories (0.22, 0.47 and 0.53 for FR, EM and LM categories, respectively). Regression procedures were used to develop equations to predict cold carcass weight, carcass conformation score, carcass fat score and proportion in the TARGET category from LW and BCS. Equations predicting cold carcass weight had high R2 values for all breed categories (0.81, 0.85 and 0.79 for the FR, EM and LM, respectively). Equations predicting carcass fatness had moderate R2 values for the beef breed categories (0.65 and 0.59 for the EM and LM, respectively). Equations predicting carcass conformation and the TARGET category yielded lower R2 values. The successful prediction of carcass weight for all breed categories and of carcass fatness for the
    • Prediction of naturally-occurring, industrially-induced and total trans fatty acids in butter, dairy spreads and Cheddar cheese using vibrational spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

      Zhao, Ming; Beattie, Renwick J.; Fearon, A.M.; O'Donnell, Colm P.; Downey, Gerard; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Elsevier, 08/08/2015)
      This study investigated the use of vibrational spectroscopy [near infrared (NIR), Fourier-transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR), Raman] and multivariate data analysis for (1) quantifying total trans fatty acids (TT), and (2) separately predicting naturally-occurring (NT; i.e., C16:1 t9; C18:1 trans-n, n = 6 … 9, 10, 11; C18:2 trans) and industrially-induced trans fatty acids (IT = TT – NT) in Irish dairy products, i.e., butter (n = 60), Cheddar cheese (n = 44), and dairy spreads (n = 54). Partial least squares regression models for predicting NT, IT and TT in each type of dairy product were developed using FT-MIR, NIR and Raman spectral data. Models based on NIR, FT-MIR and Raman spectra were used for the prediction of NT and TT content in butter; best prediction performance achieved a coefficient of determination in validation (R2V) ∼ 0.91–0.95, root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) ∼ 0.07–0.30 for NT; R2V ∼ 0.92–0.95, RMSEP ∼ 0.23–0.29 for TT.
    • Preliminary study on the use of near infrared hyperspectral imaging for quantitation and localisation of total glucosinolates in freeze-dried broccoli

      Hernandez-Hierro, Jose Miguel; Esquerre, Carlos; Valverde, Juan; Villacreces, Salvador; Reilly, Kim; Gaffney, Michael; Gonzalez-Miret, Maria Lourdes; Heredia, Francisco J.; O'Donnell, Colm P.; Downey, Gerard; et al. (Elsevier, 15/11/2013)
      The use of hyperspectral imaging to (a) quantify and (b) localise total glucosinolates in florets of a single broccoli species has been examined. Two different spectral regions (vis–NIR and NIR), a number of spectral pre-treatments and different mask development strategies were studied to develop the quantitative models. These models were then applied to freeze-dried slices of broccoli to identify regions within individual florets which were rich in glucosinolates. The procedure demonstrates potential for the quantitative screening and localisation of total glucosinolates in broccoli using the 950–1650 nm wavelength range. These compounds were mainly located in the external part of florets.
    • Preparation of modified whey protein isolate with gum acacia by ultrasound maillard reaction

      Chen, Weijun; Ma, Xiaobin; Wang, Wenjun; Lv, Ruiling; Guo, Mingming; Ding, Tian; Ye, Xingqian; Miao, Song; Liu, Donghong; National Key Research and Development Program of China; et al. (Elsevier, 2018-10-18)
      Effect of ultrasound treatment on whey protein isolate (WPI)-gum Acacia (GA) conjugation via Maillard reaction was investigated. And the physicochemical properties of the conjugates obtained by ultrasound treatment were compared with those obtained by classical heating. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, high-performance size exclusion chromatography and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provided evidence on the formation of the Maillard type conjugation. Compared with classical heating, ultrasound treatment could accelerate the glycation reaction between WPI and GA. A degree of graft of 11.20% was reached by classical heating for 48 h, whereas only 20 min was required by ultrasound treatment. Structural analyses suggested that the conjugates obtained by ultrasound treatment had less α-helix content, higher surface hydrophobicity and fluorescence intensity than those obtained by classical heating. Significantly lower level of browning intensity and significantly higher (p < 0.05) level of solubility (under alkaline conditions), thermal stability, emulsifying activity and emulsifying stability were observed for the conjugates obtained by ultrasound treatment as compared with those obtained by classical heating.
    • The Prevalence and Control of Bacillus and Related Spore-Forming Bacteria in the Dairy Industry

      Gopal, Nidhi; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Beresford, Tom; Fenelon, Mark A.; Cotter, Paul D.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Irish Dairy Levy Research Trust (Frontiers Media S. A., 21/12/2015)
      Milk produced in udder cells is sterile but due to its high nutrient content, it can be a good growth substrate for contaminating bacteria. The quality of milk is monitored via somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts, with prescribed regulatory limits to ensure quality and safety. Bacterial contaminants can cause disease, or spoilage of milk and its secondary products. Aerobic spore-forming bacteria, such as those from the genera Sporosarcina, Paenisporosarcina, Brevibacillus, Paenibacillus, Geobacillus and Bacillus, are a particular concern in this regard as they are able to survive industrial pasteurization and form biofilms within pipes and stainless steel equipment. These single or multiple-species biofilms become a reservoir of spoilage microorganisms and a cycle of contamination can be initiated. Indeed, previous studies have highlighted that these microorganisms are highly prevalent in dead ends, corners, cracks, crevices, gaskets, valves and the joints of stainless steel equipment used in the dairy manufacturing plants. Hence, adequate monitoring and control measures are essential to prevent spoilage and ensure consumer safety. Common controlling approaches include specific cleaning-in-place processes, chemical and biological biocides and other novel methods. In this review, we highlight the problems caused by these microorganisms, and discuss issues relating to their prevalence, monitoring thereof and control with respect to the dairy industry.
    • Principles and mechanisms of ultraviolet light emitting diode technology for food industry applications

      Hinds, Laura M.; O'Donnell, Colm P.; Akhter, Mahbub; Tiwari, Brijesh; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 14/F/845 (Elsevier, 2019-04-13)
      The application of ultraviolet (UV) light to water, food contact surfaces and medical equipment for microbial inactivation is widely employed. To date, UV disinfection sources employed are primarily low-pressure and medium-pressure mercury lamps; emitting monochromatic and polychromatic light, respectively. Despite the widespread use of mercury lamps, there are multiple drawbacks associated with their use including; high energy consumption, large size which limits reactor design, high heat emission and the presence of mercury. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have potential for use as a highly efficient UV decontamination technology. Recent advances in semiconductor development have resulted in UV-LEDs becoming more widely available. UV-LEDs emit monochromatic light, which enables customised UV-LED disinfection systems at specific wavelengths to be developed. The application of UV-LEDs for disinfection purposes has been studied in recent years, particularly with respect to water disinfections systems. In this review, studies relating to UV-LED food applications are discussed. Furthermore, the chemical changes induced in foods, as a result of UV treatment, together with advantages and limitations of the technology are outlined.
    • Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins of Prevalent Motile Commensal Bacteria Are Variably Abundant in the Intestinal Microbiome of Elderly Humans

      Neville, B. Anne; Sheridan, Paul O.; Harris, Hugh; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Jeffery, Ian B; Claesson, Marcus J.; Ross, R Paul; Scott, Karen P.; et al. (PLoS, 23/07/2013)
      Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute “cell motility” category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ28. The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13–4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved metagenome assembly from short reads will be required to facilitate in silico analyses of complete complex biochemical pathways for low-abundance target species from shotgun metagenomes.