• Early Gut Microbiota Perturbations Following Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Group B Streptococcal Disease

      Mazzola, Giuseppe; Murphy, Kiera; Ross, R Paul; Di Gioia, Diana; Biavati, Bruno; Corvaglia, Luigi T.; Faldella, Giacomo; Stanton, Catherine; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; European Union; et al. (PLOS, 22/06/2016)
      The faecal microbiota composition of infants born to mothers receiving intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis with ampicillin against group B Streptococcus was compared with that of control infants, at day 7 and 30 of life. Recruited newborns were both exclusive breastfed and mixed fed, in order to also study the effect of dietary factors on the microbiota composition. Massive parallel sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene and qPCR analysis were performed. Antibiotic prophylaxis caused the most marked changes on the microbiota in breastfed infants, mainly resulting in a higher relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae, compared with control infants (52% vs. 14%, p = 0.044) and mixed-fed infants (52% vs. 16%, p = 0.13 NS) at day 7 and in a lower bacterial diversity compared to mixed-fed infants and controls. Bifidobacteria were also particularly vulnerable and abundances were reduced in breastfed (p = 0.001) and mixed-fed antibiotic treated groups compared to non-treated groups. Reductions in bifidobacteria in antibiotic treated infants were also confirmed by qPCR. By day 30, the bifidobacterial population recovered and abundances significantly increased in both breastfed (p = 0.025) and mixed-fed (p = 0.013) antibiotic treated groups, whereas Enterobacteriaceae abundances remained highest in the breastfed antibiotic treated group (44%), compared with control infants (16%) and mixed-fed antibiotic treated group (28%). This study has therefore demonstrated the short term consequences of maternal intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on the infant faecal microbial population, particularly in that of breastfed infants.
    • Early Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs disrupts Microbiome composition and functionality principally at the ileum mucosa

      Argüello, Héctor; Estellé, Jordi; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Carvajal, Ana; López-Bascón, Mª Asunción; Crispie, Fiona; O’Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D.; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; et al. (Springer Nature, 2018-05-17)
      Salmonella is a major foodborne pathogen which successfully infects animal species for human consumption such as swine. The pathogen has a battery of virulence factors which it uses to colonise and persist within the host. The host microbiota may play a role in resistance to, and may also be indirectly responsible from some of the consequences of, Salmonella infection. To investigate this, we used 16S rRNA metagenomic sequencing to determine the changes in the gut microbiota of pigs in response to infection by Salmonella Typhimurium at three locations: ileum mucosa, ileum content and faeces. Early infection (2 days post-infection) impacted on the microbiome diversity at the mucosa, reflected in a decrease in representatives of the generally regarded as desirable genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus). Severe damage in the epithelium of the ileum mucosa correlated with an increase in synergistic (with respect to Salmonella infection; Akkermansia) or opportunistically pathogenic bacteria (Citrobacter) and a depletion in anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium spp., Ruminococcus, or Dialliser). Predictive functional analysis, together with metabolomic analysis revealed changes in glucose and lipid metabolism in infected pigs. The observed changes in commensal healthy microbiota, including the growth of synergistic or potentially pathogenic bacteria and depletion of beneficial or competing bacteria, could contribute to the pathogen’s ability to colonize the gut successfully. The findings from this study could be used to form the basis for further research aimed at creating intervention strategies to mitigate the effects of Salmonella infection.
    • The eating quality of beef from young dairy bulls derived from two breed types at three ages from two different production systems

      Nian, Yingqun; Kerry, Joseph P.; Prendiville, Robert; Allen, Paul; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Teagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Ireland, 08/07/2017)
      Expansion of the Irish dairy herd has led to more dairy breed male calves being available for beef production. This study investigated the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of beef from Holstein-Friesian (HF) and Jersey × HF (JEX) young bulls fed pasture grass only or pasture grass plus 2 kg concentrate during their first grazing season and slaughtered at 15, 19 or 22 mo of age. Longissimus thoracis (LT) muscles were collected from 67 carcasses. Postmortem pH, ultimate pH (pHu), meat colour, chemical composition, collagen content and solubility were evaluated. After ageing for 21 d, Warner-Bratzler shear force and cooking loss were determined, and assessments by a trained sensory panel were conducted. Meat from older animals was darker. The pHu, moisture and ash contents decreased, while residual roast beef flavour length increased with age. However, increasing age to slaughter did not negatively influence tenderness. JEX beef had lower cooking loss, was darker and redder, in addition to having higher sensory scores for initial tenderness and fattiness than HF beef. Warner-Bratzler variables were positively correlated with cooking loss and chewiness and were negatively correlated with intramuscular fat (IMF) content, soluble collagen and initial tenderness. In summary, most young dairy bull beef samples were acceptably tender after 21 d of ageing and half of them had acceptable IMF content. Slaughter age affected beef colour, pHu, chemical composition and flavour length. The eating quality of meat from the JEX breed type was considered to be superior to that of the HF breed type. Diet during the first season had no effect on meat quality traits.
    • Editorial: Microbial Food Safety along the Dairy Chain

      Fox, Edward M.; Fanning, Seamus; Corsetti, Aldo; Jordan, Kieran (Frontiers, 2017-08-23)
      Milk is susceptible to contamination with pathogenic and spoilage organisms and, therefore, Microbial food safety along the dairy chain is an important topic, from public health and industry perspectives. The dairy chain is an integral part of global food supply, with dairy food products a staple component of recommended healthy diets. The dairy food chain from production through to the consumer is complex, with various opportunities for microbial contamination of ingredients or food products, and as such interventions are key to preventing or controlling such contamination. Dairy foods often include a microbial control step in their production such as pasteurization, but in some cases may not, as with raw milk products. Microbial contamination may lead to a deterioration in food quality due to spoilage organisms, or may become a health risk to consumers should the contaminant be a pathogenic microorganism. As such food safety and food production are intrinsically linked.
    • Editorial: Microbial Food Safety along the Dairy Chain

      Fox, Edward M.; Fanning, Seamus; Corsetti, Aldo; Jordan, Kieran (Frontiers, 2017-08-23)
    • The effect of antimicrobials on verocytotoxin bacteriophage transduction under bovine rumen fluid and broth conditions

      Nyambe, Sepa; Burgess, Catherine; Whyte, Paul; Bolton, Declan J.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; 11/F/051 (Teagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Ireland, 15/11/2017)
      The verocytotoxin genes in verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) are carried by bacteriophages, incorporated into the bacterial genome (prophage). Antibiotics may promote phage replication and release to infect other cells (transduction), thus leading to the emergence of new VTEC strains. This study investigated transduction of a verocytotoxin2-encoding bacteriophage (3538(vtx2::cat)) under laboratory conditions, including the effect of antibiotic treatments. Luria-Bertani Miller broth and rumen fluid (raw and sterilised by irradiation) were inoculated with the donor (C600φ3538(Δvtx2::cat)) and recipient (E. coli C600::kanamycinR) strains (4 log10 cfu/mL) and incubated at 38°C. Antibiotic treatments (minimal inhibitory and sub-inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin, cefquinome, oxytetracycline and sodium sulfamethazine) were applied after 3 h. Samples were tested for donor, recipient, cell-free phage and transductants at times t = 0, 3, 4, 6, 27 (24 h post-antibiotic treatment) and 51 h. Free phage was detected in the untreated broth and rumen samples, as were the transductants confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. The antibiotic treatments did not significantly (P > 0.01) increase the concentrations of free phage or transductants detected. It was therefore concluded that, under laboratory conditions, the antibiotics tested did not induce bacteriophage lysis, release and infection of new bacterial cells beyond that constitutively found in the phage population.
    • Effect of Bioengineering Lacticin 3147 Lanthionine Bridges on Specific Activity and Resistance to Heat and Proteases

      Suda, Srinivas; Westerbeek, Alja; O'Connor, Paula M.; Hill, Colin; Cotter, Paul D.; Ross, R Paul; Science Foundation Ireland; 06/IN.1/B98 (Elsevier BV, 2010-10-28)
      Lacticin 3147 is a lantibiotic with seven lanthionine bridges across its two component peptides, Ltnα and Ltnβ. Although it has been proposed that the eponymous lanthionine and (β-methyl)lanthionine (Lan and meLan) bridges present in lantibiotics make an important contribution to protecting the peptides from thermal or proteolytic degradation, few studies have investigated this link. We have generated a bank of bioengineered derivatives of lacticin 3147, in which selected bridges were removed or converted between Lan and meLan, which were exposed to high temperature or proteolytic enzymes. Although switching Lan and meLan bridges has variable consequences, it was consistently observed that an intact N-terminal lanthionine bridge (Ring A) confers Ltnα with enhanced resistance to thermal and proteolytic degradation.
    • Effect of Breed and Gender on Meat Quality of M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum Muscle from Crossbred Beef Bulls and Steers

      Cafferky, Jamie; Hamill, Ruth M; Allen, Paul; O’Doherty, John V.; Cromie, Andrew; Sweeney, Torres; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 11/SF/311 (MDPI, 2019-05-21)
      Abstract The objective of this study was to determine whether sire breed and/or castration had an effect on meat quality of M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) muscle from crossbred bulls and steers and to investigate the relationship amongst the traits examined. Warner–Bratzler shear force (WBSF), intramuscular fat (IMF)%, cook-loss%, drip-loss%, colour (L*, a*, b*) and ultimate pH (upH) were determined in the LTL muscle from eight beef sire breeds representative of the Irish herd (Aberdeen Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Limousin, Parthenaise, Salers and Simmental). The results indicate that IMF%, cook-loss% and drip-loss% were associated with breed (p < 0.05); while WBSF, IMF% and cook-loss% differ between genders (p < 0.05). Steer LTL had a greater IMF% and exhibited reduced WBSF and cook-loss% in comparison to the bull LTL (p < 0.05). This study provides greater insight into how quality traits in beef are influenced by breed and gender and will support the industry to produce beef with consistent eating quality.
    • The effect of buttermilk or buttermilk powder addition on functionality, textural, sensory and volatile characteristics of Cheddar-style cheese

      Hickey, Cian D.; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Davis, Jessica; Scholz, Dimitri; Kilcawley, Kieran N; Wilkinson, M.G.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.; Dairy Levy Trust; 6259 (Elsevier, 2017-09-28)
      The influence of buttermilk or buttermilk powder addition to cheese milk or cheese curds respectively on cheese functional properties, free fatty acid profiles and subsequent volatile and sensory characteristics was investigated. Buttermilk addition to cheese milk resulted in a softer cheese compared to other cheeses, with a significantly reduced flowability, while buttermilk powder addition had no influence on cheese firmness but cheese flowability was also reduced compared to the control cheese. Larger pools of free fat, higher levels of free fatty acids, volatile compounds and significant differences in sensory profiles associated with off-flavour were also observed with the addition of buttermilk to cheese milk. Application of light microscopy, using toluidine blue stain, facilitated the visualisation of fat globule structure and distribution within the protein matrix. Addition of 10% buttermilk powder resulted in significant increases in volatile compounds originating from proteolysis pathways associated with roasted, green aromas. Descriptive sensory evaluation indicated few differences between the 10% buttermilk powder and the control cheese, while buttermilk cheeses scored negatively for sweaty, barnyard aromas, oxidized and off flavors, correlating with associated volatile aromas. Addition of 10% buttermilk powder to cheese curds results in cheese comparable to the control Cheddar with some variations in volatile compounds resulting in a cheese with similar structural and sensory characteristics albeit with subtle differences in overall cheese flavor. This could be manipulated to produce cheeses of desirable quality, with potential health benefits due to increased phospholipid levels in cheese.
    • Effect of coagulant type and level on the properties of half-salt, half-fat Cheddar cheese made with or without adjunct starter: Improving texture and functionality

      McCarthy, Catherine; Wilkinson, M.G.; Guinee, Timothy P.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 2012219 (Elsevier, 2017-08-01)
      The potential of increasing proteolysis as a means of enhancing the texture and heat-induced flow of half-fat, half-salt Cheddar cheese made with control culture (CL, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris/lactis) or adjunct culture (AC, CL + Lactobacillus helveticus) was investigated. Proteolysis was altered by substituting bovine chymosin (BC) with camel chymosin (CC), or by a 2.5-fold increase in level of BC. In cheese with CL-culture, increasing BC led to a large increase in pH and more rapid degradation of αS1-casein during maturation, and cheese that was less firm after 180 d. In contrast, substitution of BC with CC in cheeses made with CL-culture had an opposite effect. While chymosin type and level had a similar influence on αS1-casein hydrolysis in the AC-culture cheeses, it did not affect texture or flowability. Grading indicated that cheese made with AC-culture and with a higher level of BC was the most appealing.
    • Effect of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and post-insemination plane of nutrition on systemic concentrations of metabolic analytes, progesterone, hepatic gene expression and embryo development and survival in beef heifers

      Doyle, D. N.; Lonergan, P.; Diskin, Michael G.; Pierce, K.M.; Kelly, Alan K; Stanton, Catherine; Waters, Sinead M; Parr, M. H.; Kenny, David A.; Department of Agriculture Food and the Marine; et al. (Elsevier, 2018-12-26)
      Nutrition, and particularly dietary energy intake, plays a fundamental role in reproductive function in cattle. There is some evidence that supplemental omega-3 dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) can exert positive effects on fertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation, post-insemination energy plane of nutrition and their interaction on embryo survival in cattle. Crossbred beef heifers (n = 185) were individually offered barley straw ad libitum and 6 kg DM of concentrate supplemented with either a rumen-protected source of saturated fatty acid (palmitic; control, CON) or a partially rumen-protected n-3 PUFA-enriched supplement (n-3 PUFA). Estrous was synchronised using two injections of PG administered at 11-d intervals and following artificial insemination (AI = Day 0) 179 heifers exhibiting oestrus were inseminated and assigned to one of two dietary treatments: (i) remain on their pre-insemination high dietary plane of nutrition (High) or (ii) restricted to 0.6 × estimated maintenance energy requirements (Low) in a 2 × 2 factorial design. The heifers were then maintained on their assigned diets until slaughter and embryo recovery on Day 16 (n = 92) or pregnancy diagnosis by ultrasound scanning at Day 30 post-AI (n = 87). Plasma concentrations of fatty acids, metabolites, insulin, progesterone (P4) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured at appropriate intervals. Hepatic expression of mRNA for aldo-keto reductase (AKR1C), cytochrome P450 2C (CYP 2C) and cytochrome P450 3A (CYP 3A) was examined. The n-3 PUFA supplementation increased plasma n-3 PUFA concentration (P < 0.05) and reduced n-6: n-3 PUFA ratio (P < 0.05). Plasma IGF-1 was higher for n-3 PUFA relative to the CON (P < 0.05) and for High compared with Low plane of nutrition post-AI (P < 0.05) groups. A low plane of nutrition post-AI increased plasma concentrations of progesterone from Days 7–16 after insemination (P < 0.001) but reduced embryo length (P < 0.001). Supplementation with n-3 PUFA reduced and tended to reduce hepatic expression of CYP2C (P = 0.01) and CYP3A (P = 0.08), respectively. However, while dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation and an abrupt reduction in nutrient status following insemination elevated plasma concentrations of n-3 PUFA and mid and late phase P4, respectively, there was no effect of either PUFA supplementation or post-insemination plane of nutrition on embryo survival.
    • The Effect of Dietary Supplementation with Spent Cider Yeast on the Swine Distal Gut Microbiome

      Upadrasta, Aditya; O'Sulivan, Lisa; O'Sullivan, Orla; Sexton, Noel; Lawlor, Peadar G; Hill, Colin; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Enterprise Ireland; et al. (PLOS, 09/10/2013)
      Background: There is an increasing need for alternatives to antibiotics for promoting animal health, given the increasing problems associated with antibiotic resistance. In this regard, we evaluated spent cider yeast as a potential probiotic for modifying the gut microbiota in weanling pigs using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries. Methodology and Principal Findings: Piglets aged 24–26 days were assigned to one of two study groups; control (n = 12) and treatment (n = 12). The control animals were fed with a basal diet and the treatment animals were fed with basal diet in combination with cider yeast supplement (500 ml cider yeast containing ,7.6 log CFU/ml) for 21 days. Faecal samples were collected for 16s rRNA gene compositional analysis. 16S rRNA compositional sequencing analysis of the faecal samples collected from day 0 and day 21 revealed marked differences in microbial diversity at both the phylum and genus levels between the control and treatment groups. This analysis confirmed that levels of Salmonella and Escherichia were significantly decreased in the treatment group, compared with the control (P,0.001). This data suggest a positive influence of dietary supplementation with live cider yeast on the microbial diversity of the pig distal gut. Conclusions/Significance: The effect of dietary cider yeast on porcine gut microbial communities was characterized for the first time using 16S rRNA gene compositional sequencing. Dietary cider yeast can potentially alter the gut microbiota, however such changes depend on their endogenous microbiota that causes a divergence in relative response to that given diet.
    • Effect of different forage types on the volatile and sensory properties of bovine milk

      Faulkner, Hope; O'Callaghan, Tom F.; McAuliffe, Stephen; Hennessy, Deirdre; Stanton, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Maurice G.; Kerry, Joseph P.; Kilcawley, Kieran N; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 13SN401 (Elsevier, 2017-12-08)
      The effect of 3 diets (grass, grass/clover, and total mixed ration) on the volatile and sensory properties of bovine milk was assessed over an entire lactation season. Little evidence was found of direct transfer of terpenes into raw milk from the different diets, and it is likely that the monocultures of ryegrass used with and without white clover were factors as these contained very few terpenes. Evidence of direct transfer of nonterpene volatiles from forage to the subsequent raw milks was probable; however, differences in the protein carbohydrate availability and digestion in the rumen appeared to have a greater contribution to volatile profiles. Pasteurization significantly altered the volatile profiles of all milks. A direct link between the milk fatty acid content, forage, and volatile products of lipid oxidation was also evident and differences in fatty acid content of milk due to forage may also have influenced the viscosity perception of milk. Irish sensory assessors preferred pasteurized milk produced from grass-fed cows, with least preference from milk produced from total mixed ration diets. β-Carotene content was significantly higher in milks derived from grass or grass/clover and appears to have directly influenced color perception. Toluene and p-cresol are both degradation products of β-carotene and along with β-carotene were identified as potential biomarkers for milk derived from pasture. The only correlation that appeared to influence the flavor of milk as determined using ranked descriptive analysis was p-cresol. P-Cresol appears to be responsible for the barnyard aroma of milk and is also likely derived from the deamination and decarboxylation of tryptophan and tyrosine due to the higher levels of available protein in the grass and grass/clover diets. The highest levels of p-cresol were in the grass/clover diets and are likely due to the degradation of the isoflavone formononetin in the rumen, which is present in white clover swards.
    • The effect of different precooling rates and cold storage on milk microbiological quality and composition

      Paludetti, L.F.; Kelly, Alan L.; O'Brien, Bernadette; Jordan, Kieran; Gleeson, David E (Elsevier, 2018-01-10)
      The objective of this study was to measure the effect of different milk cooling rates, before entering the bulk tank, on the microbiological load and composition of the milk, as well as on energy usage. Three milk precooling treatments were applied before milk entered 3 identical bulk milk tanks: no plate cooler (NP), single-stage plate cooler (SP), and double-stage plate cooler (DP). These precooling treatments cooled the milk to 32.0 ± 1.4°C, 17.0 ± 2.8°C, and 6.0 ± 1.1°C, respectively. Milk was added to the bulk tank twice daily for 72 h, and the tank refrigeration temperature was set at 3°C. The blend temperature within each bulk tank was reduced after each milking event as the volume of milk at 3°C increased simultaneously. The bacterial counts of the milk volumes precooled at different rates did not differ significantly at 0 h of storage or at 24-h intervals thereafter. After 72 h of storage, the total bacterial count of the NP milk was 3.90 ± 0.09 log10 cfu/mL, whereas that of the precooled milk volumes were 3.77 ± 0.09 (SP) and 3.71 ± 0.09 (DP) log10 cfu/mL. The constant storage temperature (3°C) over 72 h helped to reduce bacterial growth rates in milk; consequently, milk composition was not affected and minimal, if any, proteolysis occurred. The DP treatment had the highest energy consumption (17.6 ± 0.5 Wh/L), followed by the NP (16.8 ± 2.7 Wh/L) and SP (10.6 ± 1.3 Wh/L) treatments. This study suggests that bacterial count and composition of milk are minimally affected when milk is stored at 3°C for 72 h, regardless of whether the milk is precooled; however, milk entering the tank should have good initial microbiological quality. Considering the numerical differences between bacterial counts, however, the use of the SP or DP precooling systems is recommended to maintain low levels of bacterial counts and reduce energy consumption.
    • The effect of direct and indirect heat treatment on the attributes of whey protein beverages

      Kelleher, Clodagh M.; O'Mahony, James A.; Kelly, Alan L.; O'Callaghan, Donal; Kilcawley, Kieran N; McCarthy, Noel A.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship programme; 10 RD TMFRC 703 (Elsevier, 2018-06-11)
      Thermal processing of ready-to-drink high protein beverages can have a substantial impact on the physical and sensory properties of the final product for long-life milks such as extended shelf life and ultra high temperature processed products. Direct and indirect heat treatment technologies were applied to whey protein isolate (WPI) -based beverages containing 4, 6 or 8% (w/w) protein. Lower levels of protein denaturation (66–94%) were observed using direct heating compared with indirect heating (95–99%) across protein levels and heating temperatures (121 and 135 °C final heat). Direct heat treatment resulted in significantly lower viscosity and less extensive changes to the volatile profile, compared with indirect heat treatment. Overall, the application of direct and indirect heat treatment to WPI solutions resulted in significantly different final products in terms of appearance, physical characteristics and volatile profile, with direct heating resulting in many enhanced properties compared with conventional indirect heat treatment.
    • Effect of Drying Methods on the Steroidal Alkaloid Content of Potato Peels, Shoots and Berries

      Brunton, Nigel; Hossain, Mohammad B; Rai, Dilip K.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 11F/050 (MDPI, 2016-03-25)
      The present study has found that dried potato samples yielded significantly higher levels of steroidal alkaloids such as α-solanine and α-chaconine than the corresponding fresh samples, as determined by the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Among the drying techniques used, air drying had the highest effect on steroidal alkaloid contents, followed by freeze drying and vacuum oven drying. There was no significant difference between the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples in their α-chaconine contents. However, freeze dried potato shoots and berries had significantly higher α-solanine contents (825 µg/g dry weight (DW) in shoots and 2453 µg/g DW in berries) than the vacuum oven dried ones (325 µg/g dry weight (DW) in shoots and 2080 µg/g DW in berries). The kinetics of steroidal alkaloid contents of potato shoots during air drying were monitored over a period of 21 days. Both α-solanine and α-chaconine content increased to their maximum values, 875 µg/g DW and 3385 µg/g DW, respectively, after 7 days of drying. The steroidal alkaloid contents of the shoots decreased significantly at day 9, and then remained unchanged until day 21. In line with the potato shoots, air dried potato tuber peels also had higher steroidal alkaloid content than the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples. However, a significant decrease of steroidal alkaloid content was observed in air dried potato berries, possibly due to degradation during slicing of the whole berries prior to air drying. Remarkable variation in steroidal alkaloid contents among different tissue types of potato plants was observed with the potato flowers having the highest content.
    • The Effect of Feeding Bt MON810 Maize to Pigs for 110 Days on Intestinal Microbiota

      Buzoianu, Stefan G.; Walsh, Maria C.; Rea, Mary C.; O'Sullivan, Orla; Crispie, Fiona; Cotter, Paul D.; Ross, R Paul; Gardiner, Gillian E.; Lawlor, Peadar G; European Union; et al. (PLOS, 04/05/2012)
      Objective To assess the effects of feeding Bt MON810 maize to pigs for 110 days on the intestinal microbiota. Methodology/Principal Findings Forty male pigs (~40 days old) were blocked by weight and litter ancestry and assigned to one of four treatments; 1) Isogenic maize-based diet for 110 days (Isogenic); 2) Bt maize-based diet (MON810) for 110 days (Bt); 3) Isogenic maize-based diet for 30 days followed by a Bt maize-based diet for 80 days (Isogenic/Bt); 4) Bt maize-based diet for 30 days followed by an isogenic maize-based diet for 80 days (Bt/Isogenic). Enterobacteriaceae, Lactobacillus and total anaerobes were enumerated in the feces using culture-based methods on days 0, 30, 60 and 100 of the study and in ileal and cecal digesta on day 110. No differences were found between treatments for any of these counts at any time point. The relative abundance of cecal bacteria was also determined using high-throughput 16 S rRNA gene sequencing. No differences were observed in any bacterial taxa between treatments, with the exception of the genus Holdemania which was more abundant in the cecum of pigs fed the isogenic/Bt treatment compared to pigs fed the Bt treatment (0.012 vs 0.003%; P≤0.05). Conclusions/Significance Feeding pigs a Bt maize-based diet for 110 days did not affect counts of any of the culturable bacteria enumerated in the feces, ileum or cecum. Neither did it influence the composition of the cecal microbiota, with the exception of a minor increase in the genus Holdemania. As the role of Holdemania in the intestine is still under investigation and no health abnormalities were observed, this change is not likely to be of clinical significance. These results indicate that feeding Bt maize to pigs in the context of its influence on the porcine intestinal microbiota is safe.
    • Effect of finishing diet and duration on the sensory quality and volatile profile of lamb meat

      Gkarane, Vasiliki; Brunton, Nigel; Allen, Paul; Gravador, Rufielyn S.; Claffey, Noel A.; Diskin, Michael G.; Fahey, Alan G.; Farmer, Linda J.; Moloney, Aidan P; Alcalde, Maria J.; et al. (Elsevier, 2018-08-02)
      Animal production factors can affect the sensory quality of lamb meat. The study investigated the effect of diet composition and duration of consumption on the proximate analysis, volatile profile and sensory quality of lamb meat. Ninety-nine male Texel × Scottish Blackface lambs were raised at pasture for 10 months before being assigned in groups of 11 to one of the following treatments: 100% Silage (S) for 36 (S36), 54 (S54) or 72 (S72) days; 50% Silage - 50% Concentrate (SC) for 36 (SC36), 54 (SC54) or 72 (SC72) days; 100% Concentrate (C) for 36 (C36) or 54 (C54) or 72 (C72) days. A trained sensory panel found Intensity of Lamb Aroma, Dry Aftertaste and Astringent Aftertaste to be higher in meat from lambs on the concentrate diet. Discriminant analysis showed that the volatile profile enabled discrimination of lamb based on dietary treatment but the volatile differences were insufficient to impact highly on sensory quality. Muscle from animals in the S54 group had higher Manure/Faecal Aroma and Woolly Aroma than the SC54 and C54 groups, possibly related to higher levels of indole and skatole. Further research is required to establish if these small differences would influence consumer acceptability.
    • Effect of heat treatment, evaporation and spray drying during skim milk powder manufacture on the compositional and processing characteristics of reconstituted skim milk and concentrate

      Lin, Yingchen; Kelly, Alan L.; O'Mahony, James A.; Guinee, Timothy P.; Dairy Levy Trust Co-Operative Society Limited (Elsevier, 2017-11-06)
      The effects of key manufacturing steps (heat treatment, evaporation and spray drying) during the manufacture of low- and high-heat skim milk powders (SMP) on the physico-chemical and processing characteristics of milk, and concentrates of varying total solids (TS) levels prepared by reconstituting the milk powders, were evaluated. Milk heat treatment had the most pronounced effect, with an increase in severity of heat treatment from 72 °C × 15 s to 120 °C × 120 s, prior to evaporation resulting in higher heat coagulation time (HCT) at pH 6.3–6.6 and ethanol stability (ES) at pH 6.2–6.6, and a marked deterioration of rennet-induced coagulability. Increasing TS of the milk on reconstitution from 9.4 to 25% reduced HCT at pH >6.3 and ES at pH 6.6–7.0, increased ES at pH 6.2–6.4, and led to partial recovery of rennet-coagulability. The results highlight how heat treatment may be used to customise the functionality of SMP to different applications.
    • The Effect of High Pressure Processing on Antioxidant Activity of Irish Potato Cultivars

      Tsikrika, Konstantina; Rai, Dilip K.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 17/F/299 (MDPI, 2019-04-16)
      The effect of High Pressure Processing (HPP) on Irish potato cultivars’ antioxidant activity (AOA) was examined. High Pressure Processing at 600 MPa for 3 min was applied to two coloured (Rooster and Kerr’s Pink) and two white (Saxon and Gemson) Irish potato varieties. Antioxidant activity was assayed spectrophotometrically by ferric reducing antioxidant power and diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl methods. No statistically significant (p ≥ 0.05) change in antioxidant activity was observed in both the AOA methods irrespective of the HPP treatments, although a slight increase in the activity was noted in the majority of the HPP treated samples. This implies that HPP treatment has little role in improving the functional qualities, and can be tailored to improve the quality and safety of the commonly consumed potatoes.