Now showing items 1-20 of 776

    • Meta-proteomics for the discovery of protein biomarkers of beef tenderness: An overview of integrated studies

      Picard, Brigitte; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Marie Skłodowska-Curie Grant; Enterprise Ireland; Pôle Aquitain Agro-Alimentation et Nutrition; National Institute of Agronomical Research; National Institute of Origin and Quality; FNADT Massif Central; DATAR Massif Central; ANR GenAnimal; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2020-01)
      This meta-proteomics review focused on proteins identified as candidate biomarkers of beef tenderness by comparing extreme groups of tenderness using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) associated with mass spectrometry (MS). We reviewed in this integromics study the results of 12 experiments that identified protein biomarkers from two muscles, Longissimus thoracis (LT) and Semitendinosus (ST), of different types of cattle: young bulls, steers or cows from beef breeds (Charolais, Limousin, Blond d’Aquitaine), hardy breed (Salers) or mixed breed (PDO Maine-Anjou). Comparative proteomics of groups differing in their tenderness evaluated by instrumental Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) or by sensory analysis using trained panelists, revealed 61 proteins differentially abundant (P < 0.05) between tender and tough groups. A higher number of discriminative proteins was observed for LT (50 proteins) compared to ST muscle (28 proteins). The Gene Ontology annotations showed that the proteins of structure and contraction, protection against oxidative stress and apoptosis, energy metabolism, 70 family HSPs and proteasome subunits are more involved in LT tenderness than in ST. Amongst the list of candidate biomarkers of tenderness some proteins such as HSPB1 are common between the 2 muscles whatever the evaluation method of tenderness, but some relationships with tenderness for others (MYH1, TNNT3, HSPB6) are inversed. Muscle specificities were revealed in this meta-proteomic study. For example, Parvalbumin (PVALB) appeared as a robust biomarker in ST muscle whatever the evaluation method of tenderness. HSPA1B seems to be a robust candidate for LT tenderness (with WBSF) regardless the animal type. Some gender specificities were further identified including similarities between cows and steers (MSRA and HSPA9) in contrast to bulls. The comparison of the 12 proteomic studies revealed strong dissimilarities to identify generic biomarkers of beef tenderness. This integrative analysis allowed better understanding of the biological processes involved in tenderness in two muscles and their variations according to the main factors underlying this quality. It allowed also proposing for the first time a comprehensive list of candidate biomarkers to be evaluated deeply to validate their relationships with tenderness on a large number of cattle and breeds.
    • Advances of plant-based structured food delivery systems on the in vitro digestibility of bioactive compounds

      Comunian, Talita Aline; Drusch, Stephan; Brodkorb, Andre; Research Leaders 2025 programme; European Union; Science Foundation Ireland; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Teagasc; 754380; 16/RC/3835 (Taylor & Francis, 2021-03-27)
      Food researchers are currently showing a growing interest in in vitro digestibility studies due to their importance for obtaining food products with health benefits and ensuring a balanced nutrient intake. Various bioactive food compounds are sensitive to the digestion process, which results in a lower bioavailability in the gut. The main objective of structured food delivery systems is to promote the controlled release of these compounds at the desired time/place, in addition to protecting them during digestion processes. This review provides an overview of the influence of structured delivery systems on the in vitro digestive behavior. The main delivery systems are summarized, the pros and cons of different structures are outlined, and examples of several studies that optimized the use of these structured systems are provided. In addition, we have reviewed the use of plant-based systems, which have been of interest to food researchers and the food industry because of their health benefits, improved sustainability as well as being an alternative for vegetarian, vegan and consumers suffering from food allergies. In this context, the review provides new insights and comprehensive knowledge regarding the influence of plant-based structured systems on the digestibility of encapsulated compounds and proteins/polysaccharides used in the encapsulation process.
    • Antioxidant active packaging systems to extend the shelf life of sliced cooked ham

      Pateiro, Mirian; Domínguez, Rubén; Bermúdez, Roberto; Munekata, Paulo E.S.; Zhang, Wangang; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Lorenzo, José M.; INIA-MINECO; Axencia Galega de Innovación; CYTED; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2019-11)
      The effectiveness of active packaging systems with green tea extract and oregano essential oil was checked for their use in sliced cooked ham. Three packaging systems were evaluated: i) control group without active film, ii) ATGT packed with active film of green tea extract (1%) and iii) ATRX with a mixture of green tea extract and oregano essential oil (1%). The evolution of microbiological, physicochemical (pH, aw, colour and lipid oxidation) and sensory attributes were analysed after 0, 7, 14 and 21 days of refrigerated storage. Microbial populations were below the limits established by the European Regulations (106 UFC/g). The samples packed with ATGT showed the better antimicrobial activity against total viable counts (TVC) and lactic acid bacteria (BAL), while lower counts of Brochothrix thermosphacta was observed in ATRX film (1.48 vs. 1.78 and 2.59 UFC/g for ATRX vs. ATGT and CON, respectively). Regarding colour, low differences were found between the samples packaged with active and control films. Unlike L*, a* and b* parameters showed a progressive diminution throughout the storage in all batches, being the films that contained green tea (ATGT) were the ones that showed the less discolouration at the end of storage (8.86 vs. 8.63 and 7.50 for ATGT vs. CON and ATRX, respectively). The low fat content of this type of product and the use of anaerobic atmosphere for the packaging of cooked ham did not allow to show an antioxidant effect on lipid oxidation (values below 0.15 mg MDA/kg). Finally, the use of ATGT and ATRX did not suppose a modification of the sensorial attributes of the product, being acceptance scores under the acceptance limit during the whole display.
    • Solubility of carbon dioxide in renneted casein matrices: Effect of pH, salt, temperature, partial pressure, and moisture to protein ratio

      Lamichhane, Prabin; Sharma, Prateek; Kelly, Alan L.; Risbo, Jens; Rattray, Fergal P.; Sheehan, Diarmuid (JJ); Dairy Research Ireland; Omua; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Elsevier, 2020-07-25)
      The solubility of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the moisture and protein components of cheese matrices and the influence of changing pH, salt and temperature levels remains unclear. In this study, model casein matrices were prepared, by renneting of micellar casein concentrate (MCC), with modulation of salt and pH levels by adding salt and glucono delta-lactone, respectively, to the MCC solutions prior to renneting. Different moisture-to-protein levels were achieved by freeze-drying, incubation of samples at different relative humidities, or by applying varying pressures during gel manufacture. The CO2 solubility of samples decreased linearly with both increasing temperature and salt-in-moisture content, whereas solubility of CO2 increased with increasing pH. A non-linear relationship was observed between CO2 solubility and the moisture-to-protein ratio of experimental samples. Overall, such knowledge may be applied to improve the quality and consistency of eye-type cheese, and in particular to avoid development of undesirable slits and cracks.
    • Delivery of β-carotene to the in vitro intestinal barrier using nanoemulsions with lecithin or sodium caseinate as emulsifiers

      Gasa-Falcon, Ariadna; Arranz, Elena; Odriozola-Serrano, Isabel; Martín-Belloso, Olga; Giblin, Linda; Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional; Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad; European Union; Enterprise Ireland; Science Foundation Ireland; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-01-13)
      To increase the intestinal delivery of dietary β-carotene, there is a need to develop nanostructured food systems to encapsulate this fat soluble bioactive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioacessibility and bioavailability across the intestinal barrier of β-carotene-enriched nanoemulsions stabilised with two emulsifiers (lecithin or sodium caseinate) by coupling an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion with two in vitro cell culture models (Caco-2 or co-culture of Caco-2/HT29-MTX). Nanoemulsions stabilised with lecithin had significantly higher β-carotene in the gastrointestinal digested micellar fraction, lower β-carotene in the Caco-2 (and Caco-2/HT29-MTX) apical compartment and significantly higher β-carotene in Caco-2 cellular content compared to β-carotene-enriched nanoemulsions stabilised with sodium caseinate. Finally, to assess anti-inflammatory activity of digested nanoemulsions, lipopolysaccharide stimulated macrophages were exposed to Caco- 2 basolateral samples with levels of TNF-α and IL-β, subsequently quantified. A TNF-α response from stimulated THP-1 macrophages was elicited by basolateral samples, regardless the emulsifier used to formulate nanoemulsions. This study demonstrated that β-carotene permeability is influenced by the food derived emulsifier used for stabilising nanoemulsions, indicating that composition may be a critical factor for β-carotene delivery.
    • Whey for Sarcopenia; Can Whey Peptides, Hydrolysates or Proteins Play a Beneficial Role?

      Gilmartin, Sarah; O’Brien, Nora; Giblin, Linda; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Science Foundation Ireland; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; FIRM 15F604-TOMI; 16/RC/3835-VistaMilk (MDPI AG, 2020-06-05)
      As the human body ages, skeletal muscle loses its mass and strength. It is estimated that in 10% of individuals over the age of 60, this muscle frailty has progressed to sarcopenia. Biomarkers of sarcopenia include increases in inflammatory markers and oxidative stress markers and decreases in muscle anabolic markers. Whey is a high-quality, easily digested dairy protein which is widely used in the sports industry. This review explores the evidence that whey protein, hydrolysates or peptides may have beneficial effects on sarcopenic biomarkers in myoblast cell lines, in aged rodents and in human dietary intervention trials with the older consumer. A daily dietary supplementation of 35 g of whey is likely to improve sarcopenic biomarkers in frail or sarcopenia individuals. Whey supplementation, consumed by an older, healthy adult certainly improves muscle mTOR signaling, but exercise appears to have the greatest benefit to older muscle. In vitro cellular assays are central for bioactive and bioavailable peptide identification and to determine their mechanism of action on ageing muscle.
    • The Potential Impact of Probiotics on the Gut Microbiome of Athletes

      Wosinska, Laura; Cotter, Paul D.; O’Sullivan, Orla; Guinane, Caitriona; Science Foundation Ireland; SFI/12/RC/2273 (MDPI AG, 2019-09-21)
      There is accumulating evidence that physical fitness influences the gut microbiome and as a result, promotes health. Indeed, exercise-induced alterations in the gut microbiome can influence health parameters crucial to athletic performance, specifically, immune function, lower susceptibility to infection, inflammatory response and tissue repair. Consequently, maintenance of a healthy gut microbiome is essential for an athlete’s health, training and performance. This review explores the effect of exercise on the microbiome while also investigating the effect of probiotics on various potential consequences associated with over-training in athletes, as well as their associated health benefits.
    • Precision Nutrition and the Microbiome, Part I: Current State of the Science

      Mills, Susan; Stanton, Catherine; Lane, Jonathan; Smith, Graeme; Ross, R. (MDPI AG, 2019-04-24)
      The gut microbiota is a highly complex community which evolves and adapts to its host over a lifetime. It has been described as a virtual organ owing to the myriad of functions it performs, including the production of bioactive metabolites, regulation of immunity, energy homeostasis and protection against pathogens. These activities are dependent on the quantity and quality of the microbiota alongside its metabolic potential, which are dictated by a number of factors, including diet and host genetics. In this regard, the gut microbiome is malleable and varies significantly from host to host. These two features render the gut microbiome a candidate ‘organ’ for the possibility of precision microbiomics—the use of the gut microbiome as a biomarker to predict responsiveness to specific dietary constituents to generate precision diets and interventions for optimal health. With this in mind, this two-part review investigates the current state of the science in terms of the influence of diet and specific dietary components on the gut microbiota and subsequent consequences for health status, along with opportunities to modulate the microbiota for improved health and the potential of the microbiome as a biomarker to predict responsiveness to dietary components. In particular, in Part I, we examine the development of the microbiota from birth and its role in health. We investigate the consequences of poor-quality diet in relation to infection and inflammation and discuss diet-derived microbial metabolites which negatively impact health. We look at the role of diet in shaping the microbiome and the influence of specific dietary components, namely protein, fat and carbohydrates, on gut microbiota composition.
    • Nanoemulsions and acidified milk gels as a strategy for improving stability and antioxidant activity of yarrow phenolic compounds after gastrointestinal digestion

      Villalva, M.; Jaime, L.; Arranz, E.; Zhao, Z.; Corredig, M.; Reglero, G.; Santoyo, S. (Elsevier BV, 2020-04)
      The aim of this study was to improve the stability and antioxidant activity of yarrow phenolic compounds upon an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Therefore, two types of caseins-based delivery systems, sodium caseinate stabilized nanoemulsions (NEs) and glucono delta-lactone acidified milk gels (MGs), were formulated containing an ultrasound-assisted yarrow extract (YE) at two concentrations (1 and 2.5 mg/mL). Formulations with 1 mg/mL of YE were chosen based on their higher encapsulation efficiency to perform the in vitro digestion experiments. After digestion, YE-loaded NEs only partially protected phenolic compounds from degradation; meanwhile the phenolic composition of YE including in MGs after digestion was quite similar to undigested YE. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of MGs after digestion was higher than NEs digested samples, which confirms the higher protection of YE phenolic compound by the milk gels systems. This research demonstrated the potential use of acidified MGs as carriers to improve the stability and antioxidant activity of yarrow phenolic compounds. Therefore, these matrices could be employed to develop new dairy products enriched with phenolic compounds.
    • Dietary Compounds Influencing the Sensorial, Volatile and Phytochemical Properties of Bovine Milk

      Clarke, Holly J.; Griffin, Carol; Rai, Dilip K.; O’Callaghan, Tom F.; O’Sullivan, Maurice G.; Kerry, Joseph P.; Kilcawley, Kieran N.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 2016071 (MDPI AG, 2019-12-19)
      The main aim of this study was to evaluate the volatile profile, sensory perception, and phytochemical content of bovine milk produced from cows fed on three distinct feeding systems, namely grass (GRS), grass/clover (CLV), and total mixed ration (TMR). Previous studies have identified that feed type can influence the sensory perception of milk directly via the transfer of volatile aromatic compounds, or indirectly by the transfer of non-volatile substrates that act as precursors for volatile compounds. In the present study, significant differences were observed in the phytochemical profile of the different feed and milk samples. The isoflavone formonoetin was significantly higher in CLV feed samples, but higher in raw GRS milk, while other smaller isoflavones, such as daidzein, genistein, and apigenin were highly correlated to raw CLV milk. This suggests that changes in isoflavone content and concentration in milk relate to diet, but also to metabolism in the rumen. This study also found unique potential volatile biomarkers in milk (dimethyl sulfone) related to feeding systems, or significant differences in the concentration of others (toluene, p-cresol, ethyl and methyl esters) based on feeding systems. TMR milk scored significantly higher for hay-like flavor and white color, while GRS and CLV milk scored significantly higher for a creamy color. Milk samples were easily distinguishable by their volatile profile based on feeding system, storage time, and pasteurization.
    • Lactobacillus acidophilus JCM 1132 Strain and Its Mutant with Different Bacteriocin-Producing Behaviour Have Various In Situ Effects on the Gut Microbiota of Healthy Mice

      Wang, Gang; Yu, Yunxia; Garcia-Gutierrez, Enriqueta; Jin, Xing; He, Yufeng; Wang, Linlin; Tian, Peijun; Liu, Zhenmin; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; et al. (MDPI AG, 2019-12-25)
      The production of bacteriocin is considered to be a probiotic trait of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). However, not all strains of LAB harbour bacteriocin genes, even within the same species. Moreover, the effects of bacteriocins on the host gut microbiota and on host physiological indicators are rarely studied. This study evaluated the effects of the bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strain JCM1132 and its non-producing spontaneous mutant, L. acidophilus CCFM720, on the physiological statuses and gut microbiota of healthy mice. Mice that received the bacteriocin-producing strain JCM1132 exhibited reduced water and food intake. Furthermore, the administration of these strains induced significant changes in the compositional abundance of faecal microbiota at the phylum and genus levels, and some of these changes were more pronounced after one week of withdrawal. The effects of CCFM720 treatment on the gut microbiota seemed to favour the prevention of metabolic diseases to some extent. However, individuals that received JCM1132 treatment exhibited weaker inflammatory responses than those that received CCFM720 treatment. Our results indicate that treatment with bacteriocin-producing or non-producing strains can have different effects on the host. Accordingly, this trait should be considered in the applications of LAB.
    • Impact of Bovine Diet on Metabolomic Profile of Skim Milk and Whey Protein Ingredients

      Magan, Jonathan B.; O’Callaghan, Tom F.; Zheng, Jiamin; Zhang, Lun; Mandal, Rupasri; Hennessy, Deirdre; Fenelon, Mark A.; Wishart, David S.; Kelly, Alan L.; McCarthy, Noel A. (MDPI AG, 2019-12-17)
      The influence of bovine diet on the metabolome of reconstituted skim milk powder (SMP) and protein ingredients produced from the milk of cows fed on pasture or concentrate-based diets was investigated. Cows were randomly assigned to diets consisting of perennial ryegrass only (GRS), perennial ryegrass/white clover sward (CLV), or indoor total mixed ration (TMR) for an entire lactation. Raw milk obtained from each group was processed at pilot scale, to produce SMP and sweet whey, and SMP was further processed at laboratory scale, to yield ideal whey and acid whey. The total amino acid composition and metabolome of each sample were analyzed, using high-performance cation exchange and a targeted combination of direct-injection mass spectrometry and reverse-phase liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS), respectively. The nitrogen composition of the products from each of the diets was similar, with one exception being the significantly higher nonprotein nitrogen content in TMR-derived skim milk powder than that from the GRS system. Total amino acid analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of glycine in GRS- and CLV-derived sweet whey and acid whey than in those from TMR. The cysteine contents of CLV-derived ideal whey and acid whey were significantly higher than for TMR, while the valine content of GRS-derived acid whey was significantly higher than TMR. The phenylalanine content of GRS-derived ideal whey was significantly higher than that from CLV. Metabolomic analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of the metabolites glutamine, valine, and phosphocreatine in each ingredient type derived from TMR than those from GRS or CLV, while the serine content of each GRS-derived ingredient type was significantly higher than that in TMR-derived ingredients. These results demonstrate that the type of bovine feeding system used can have a significant effect on the amino acid composition and metabolome of skim milk and whey powders and may aid in the selection of raw materials for product manufacture, while the clear separation between the samples gives further evidence for distinguishing milk products produced from different feeding systems based on LC–MS/MS
    • Bioaccessibility and Cellular Uptake of β-Carotene Encapsulated in Model O/W Emulsions: Influence of Initial Droplet Size and Emulsifiers

      Lu, Wei; Kelly, Alan; Miao, Song; China Scholarship Council; National Natural Science Foundation of China; 201508300001; 31628016 (MDPI AG, 2017-09-20)
      The effects of the initial emulsion structure (droplet size and emulsifier) on the properties of β-carotene-loaded emulsions and the bioavailability of β-carotene after passing through simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) digestion were investigated. Exposure to GIT significantly changed the droplet size, surface charge and composition of all emulsions, and these changes were dependent on their initial droplet size and the emulsifiers used. Whey protein isolate (WPI)-stabilized emulsion showed the highest β-carotene bioaccessibility, while sodium caseinate (SCN)-stabilized emulsion showed the highest cellular uptake of β-carotene. The bioavailability of emulsion-encapsulated β-carotene based on the results of bioaccessibility and cellular uptake showed the same order with the results of cellular uptake being SCN > TW80 > WPI. An inconsistency between the results of bioaccessibility and bioavailability was observed, indicating that the cellular uptake assay is necessary for a reliable evaluation of the bioavailability of emulsion-encapsulated compounds. The findings in this study contribute to a better understanding of the correlation between emulsion structure and the digestive fate of emulsion-encapsulated nutrients, which make it possible to achieve controlled or potential targeted delivery of nutrients by designing the structure of emulsion-based carriers.
    • Measurement of syneretic properties of rennet-induced curds and impact of factors such as concentration of milk: A review

      Panthi, Ram R.; Kelly, Alan L.; O'Callaghan, Donal J.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.; Dairy Research Ireland; 6259 (Elsevier BV, 2019-09)
      Background The rate or extent of whey expulsion or syneresis from cheese curds during stirring in-vat determines curd moisture levels, which subsequently influences cheese moisture content. The outward migration of whey depends on curd contraction and on the structure of the pores permitting whey movement. Curd syneretic properties are one of the least understood areas of cheese science, particularly when milk of varying composition is used. Scope and approach This review provides an insight into the mechanisms of curd formation and curd syneresis, and factors influencing syneretic properties in unconcentrated and concentrated milk and appraises syneresis measurement methods in terms of their relative strengths and weaknesses. Key findings and conclusions Direct measurement of moisture content of curds is recommended as a simple and reliable method for measurement of syneresis of industrial relevance and, although inline measurement for curd moisture prediction has been a significant development in the last decade, its application to commercial production is still limited. A review of previous studies found that experimental conditions and methodologies used to measure syneresis vary widely, making it difficult to compare data between studies. Overall, interactions between process variables employed determines whether syneresis is accentuated or inhibited, and this can be exploited by cheese producers to attain target curd moisture contents by varying process parameters, particularly when milk is concentrated prior to cheese-making. Furthermore, further studies should be focused on endogenous syneresis and casein network rearrangement to clearly elucidate this mechanism and its influence on macrosyneresis under dynamic conditions.
    • Optimisation of Ultrasound Frequency, Extraction Time and Solvent for the Recovery of Polyphenols, Phlorotannins and Associated Antioxidant Activity from Brown Seaweeds

      Ummat, Viruja; Tiwari, Brijesh K; Jaiswal, Amit K; Condon, Kevin; Garcia-Vaquero, Marco; O’Doherty, John; O’Donnell, Colm; Rajauria, Gaurav; Science Foundation Ireland; 16/RC/3889; et al. (MDPI AG, 2020-05-11)
      This study investigates ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) process parameters (time, frequency and solvent) to obtain high yields of phlorotannins, flavonoids, total phenolics and associated antioxidant activities from 11 brown seaweed species. Optimised UAE conditions (35 kHz, 30 min and 50% ethanol) significantly improved the extraction yield from 1.5-fold to 2.2-fold in all seaweeds investigated compared to solvent extraction. Using ultrasound, the highest recovery of total phenolics (TPC: 572.3 ± 3.2 mg gallic acid equivalent/g), total phlorotannins (TPhC: 476.3 ± 2.2 mg phloroglucinol equivalent/g) and total flavonoids (TFC: 281.0 ± 1.7 mg quercetin equivalent/g) was obtained from Fucus vesiculosus seaweed. While the lowest recovery of TPC (72.6 ± 2.9 mg GAE/g), TPhC (50.3 ± 2.0 mg PGE/g) and TFC (15.2 ± 3.3 mg QE/g) was obtained from Laminaria digitata seaweed. However, extracts from Fucus serratus obtained by UAE exhibited the strongest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity (29.1 ± 0.25 mg trolox equivalent/g) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) value (63.9 ± 0.74 mg trolox equivalent/g). UAE under optimised conditions was an effective, low-cost and eco-friendly technique to recover biologically active polyphenols from 11 brown seaweed species.
    • Dietary Supplementation with a Magnesium-Rich Marine Mineral Blend Enhances the Diversity of Gastrointestinal Microbiota

      Crowley, Erin; Long-Smith, Caitriona; Murphy, Amy; Patterson, Elaine; Murphy, Kiera; O’Gorman, Denise; Stanton, Catherine; Nolan, Yvonne; Science Foundation Ireland; European Union; et al. (MDPI AG, 2018-06-20)
      Accumulating evidence demonstrates that dietary supplementation with functional food ingredients play a role in systemic and brain health as well as in healthy ageing. Conversely, deficiencies in calcium and magnesium as a result of the increasing prevalence of a high fat/high sugar “Western diet” have been associated with health problems such as obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and cardiovascular diseases, as well as metabolic, immune, and psychiatric disorders. It is now recognized that modulating the diversity of gut microbiota, the population of intestinal bacteria, through dietary intervention can significantly impact upon gut health as well as systemic and brain health. In the current study, we show that supplementation with a seaweed and seawater-derived functional food ingredient rich in bioactive calcium and magnesium (0.1% supplementation) as well as 70 other trace elements, significantly enhanced the gut microbial diversity in adult male rats. Given the significant impact of gut microbiota on health, these results position this marine multi-mineral blend (MMB) as a promising digestive-health promoting functional food ingredient.
    • Current Status and Future Prospects of Marine Natural Products (MNPs) as Antimicrobials

      Choudhary, Alka; Naughton, Lynn; Montánchez, Itxaso; Dobson, Alan; Rai, Dilip; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; FIRM 11/F/009 (MDPI AG, 2017-08-28)
      The marine environment is a rich source of chemically diverse, biologically active natural products, and serves as an invaluable resource in the ongoing search for novel antimicrobial compounds. Recent advances in extraction and isolation techniques, and in state-of-the-art technologies involved in organic synthesis and chemical structure elucidation, have accelerated the numbers of antimicrobial molecules originating from the ocean moving into clinical trials. The chemical diversity associated with these marine-derived molecules is immense, varying from simple linear peptides and fatty acids to complex alkaloids, terpenes and polyketides, etc. Such an array of structurally distinct molecules performs functionally diverse biological activities against many pathogenic bacteria and fungi, making marine-derived natural products valuable commodities, particularly in the current age of antimicrobial resistance. In this review, we have highlighted several marine-derived natural products (and their synthetic derivatives), which have gained recognition as effective antimicrobial agents over the past five years (2012–2017). These natural products have been categorized based on their chemical structures and the structure-activity mediated relationships of some of these bioactive molecules have been discussed. Finally, we have provided an insight into how genome mining efforts are likely to expedite the discovery of novel antimicrobial compounds.
    • The Identification of a SIRT6 Activator from Brown Algae Fucus distichus

      Rahnasto-Rilla, Minna; McLoughlin, Padraig; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Doyle, Maire; Bohr, Vilhelm; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hayes, Maria; Moaddel, Ruin; NIA Intramural Research Program; et al. (MDPI AG, 2017-06-21)
      Brown seaweeds contain many bioactive compounds, including polyphenols, polysaccharides, fucosterol, and fucoxantin. These compounds have several biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, anti-tumor, anti-hypertensive, and anti-diabetic activity, although in most cases their mechanisms of action are not understood. In this study, extracts generated from five brown algae (Fucus dichitus, Fucus vesiculosus (Linnaeus), Cytoseira tamariscofolia, Cytoseira nodacaulis, Alaria esculenta) were tested for their ability to activate SIRT6 resulting in H3K9 deacetylation. Three of the five macroalgal extracts caused a significant increase of H3K9 deacetylation, and the effect was most pronounced for F. dichitus. The compound responsible for this in vitro activity was identified by mass spectrometry as fucoidan.
    • Health Benefits of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Fermentates

      Mathur, Harsh; Beresford, Tom P.; Cotter, Paul D.; Food for Health Ireland; TC/2018/0025 (MDPI AG, 2020-06-04)
      Consuming fermented foods has been reported to result in improvements in a range of health parameters. These positive effects can be exerted by a combination of the live microorganisms that the fermented foods contain, as well as the bioactive components released into the foods as by-products of the fermentation process. In many instances, and particularly in dairy fermented foods, the microorganisms involved in the fermentation process belong to the lactic acid group of bacteria (LAB). An alternative approach to making some of the health benefits that have been attributed to fermented foods available is through the production of ‘fermentates’. The term ‘fermentate’ generally relates to a powdered preparation, derived from a fermented product and which can contain the fermenting microorganisms, components of these microorganisms, culture supernatants, fermented substrates, and a range of metabolites and bioactive components with potential health benefits. Here, we provide a brief overview of a selection of in vitro and in vivo studies and patents exclusively reporting the health benefits of LAB ‘fermentates’. Typically, in such studies, the potential health benefits have been attributed to the bioactive metabolites present in the crude fermentates and/or culture supernatants rather than the direct effects of the LAB strain(s) involved.
    • Recipe for a Healthy Gut: Intake of Unpasteurised Milk Is Associated with Increased Lactobacillus Abundance in the Human Gut Microbiome

      Butler, Mary I.; Bastiaanssen, Thomaz F. S.; Long-Smith, Caitriona; Berding, Kirsten; Morkl, Sabrina; Cusack, Anne-Marie; Strain, Conall; Busca, Kizkitza; Porteous-Allen, Penny; Claesson, Marcus J.; et al. (MDPI AG, 2020-05-19)
      Introduction: The gut microbiota plays a role in gut–brain communication and can influence psychological functioning. Diet is one of the major determinants of gut microbiota composition. The impact of unpasteurised dairy products on the microbiota is unknown. In this observational study, we investigated the effect of a dietary change involving intake of unpasteurised dairy on gut microbiome composition and psychological status in participants undertaking a residential 12-week cookery course on an organic farm. Methods: Twenty-four participants completed the study. The majority of food consumed during their stay originated from the organic farm itself and included unpasteurised milk and dairy products. At the beginning and end of the course, participants provided faecal samples and completed self-report questionnaires on a variety of parameters including mood, anxiety and sleep. Nutrient intake was monitored with a food frequency questionnaire. Gut microbiota analysis was performed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Additionally, faecal short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were measured. Results: Relative abundance of the genus Lactobacillus increased significantly between pre- and post-course time points. This increase was associated with participants intake of unpasteurised milk and dairy products. An increase in the faecal SCFA, valerate, was observed along with an increase in the functional richness of the microbiome profile, as determined by measuring the predictive neuroactive potential using a gut–brain module approach. Conclusions: While concerns in relation to safety need to be considered, intake of unpasteurised milk and dairy products appear to be associated with the growth of the probiotic bacterial genus, Lactobacillus, in the human gut. More research is needed on the effect of dietary changes on gut microbiome composition, in particular in relation to the promotion of bacterial genera, such as Lactobacillus, which are recognised as being beneficial for a range of physical and mental health outcomes.