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dc.contributor.authorGolubeva, Anna V.
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Susan A.
dc.contributor.authorMoloney, Gerard
dc.contributor.authorBurokas, Aurelijus
dc.contributor.authorSherwin, Eoin
dc.contributor.authorArboleya, Silvia
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Ian
dc.contributor.authorKhochanskiy, Dmitry
dc.contributor.authorMoya-Pérez, Angela
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Veronica
dc.contributor.authorRea, Kieran
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kiera
dc.contributor.authorMakarova, Olga
dc.contributor.authorBuravkov, Sergey
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Niall P.
dc.contributor.authorSTANTON, CATHERINE
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Gerard
dc.contributor.authorGahan, Cormac G.M.
dc.contributor.authorDinan, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.authorCryan, John F.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-03T14:38:33Z
dc.date.available2020-07-03T14:38:33Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-21
dc.identifier.citationGolubeva, A., Joyce, S., Moloney, G., Burokas, A., Sherwin, E., Arboleya, S., Flynn, I., Khochanskiy, D., Moya-Pérez, A., Peterson, V., Rea, K., Murphy, K., Makarova, O., Buravkov, S., Hyland, N., Stanton, C., Clarke, G., Gahan, C., Dinan, T. and Cryan, J. (2017). Microbiota-related Changes in Bile Acid & Tryptophan Metabolism are Associated with Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Autism. EBioMedicine, 24, 166-178. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.09.020en_US
dc.identifier.issn2352-3964
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2149
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractAutism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most prevalent neurodevelopmental conditions worldwide. There is growing awareness that ASD is highly comorbid with gastrointestinal distress and altered intestinal microbiome, and that host-microbiome interactions may contribute to the disease symptoms. However, the paucity of knowledge on gut-brain axis signaling in autism constitutes an obstacle to the development of precision microbiota-based therapeutics in ASD. To this end, we explored the interactions between intestinal microbiota, gut physiology and social behavior in a BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mouse model of ASD. Here we show that a reduction in the relative abundance of very particular bacterial taxa in the BTBR gut – namely, bile-metabolizing Bifidobacterium and Blautia species, - is associated with deficient bile acid and tryptophan metabolism in the intestine, marked gastrointestinal dysfunction, as well as impaired social interactions in BTBR mice. Together these data support the concept of targeted manipulation of the gut microbiota for reversing gastrointestinal and behavioral symptomatology in ASD, and offer specific plausible targets in this endeavor.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEBioMedicine;Vol. 24
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectAutismen_US
dc.subjectBTBR mouseen_US
dc.subjectGut microbiotaen_US
dc.subjectIntestinal permeabilityen_US
dc.subjectIntestinal transiten_US
dc.subjectBile acidsen_US
dc.subjectSerotoninen_US
dc.subjectTryptophanen_US
dc.titleMicrobiota-related Changes in Bile Acid & Tryptophan Metabolism are Associated with Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Autismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.embargo.terms2050-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.09.020
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Irelanden_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberSFI/12/RC/2273en_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberSFI-EU 16/ERA-HDHL/3358en_US
dc.source.volume24
dc.source.beginpage166-178


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