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dc.contributor.authorLyons, Katríona E.
dc.contributor.authorRyan, C. Anthony
dc.contributor.authorDempsey, Eugene M.
dc.contributor.authorRoss, R Paul
dc.contributor.authorSTANTON, CATHERINE
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-24T15:54:15Z
dc.date.available2020-07-24T15:54:15Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-09
dc.identifier.citationLyons, K.E.; Ryan, C.A.; Dempsey, E.M.; Ross, R.P.; Stanton, C. Breast Milk, a Source of Beneficial Microbes and Associated Benefits for Infant Health. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1039. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041039en_US
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2182
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractHuman breast milk is considered the optimum feeding regime for newborn infants due to its ability to provide complete nutrition and many bioactive health factors. Breast feeding is associated with improved infant health and immune development, less incidences of gastrointestinal disease and lower mortality rates than formula fed infants. As well as providing fundamental nutrients to the growing infant, breast milk is a source of commensal bacteria which further enhance infant health by preventing pathogen adhesion and promoting gut colonisation of beneficial microbes. While breast milk was initially considered a sterile fluid and microbes isolated were considered contaminants, it is now widely accepted that breast milk is home to its own unique microbiome. The origins of bacteria in breast milk have been subject to much debate, however, the possibility of an entero-mammary pathway allowing for transfer of microbes from maternal gut to the mammary gland is one potential pathway. Human milk derived strains can be regarded as potential probiotics; therefore, many studies have focused on isolating strains from milk for subsequent use in infant health and nutrition markets. This review aims to discuss mammary gland development in preparation for lactation as well as explore the microbial composition and origins of the human milk microbiota with a focus on probiotic development.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNutrients;12
dc.rightsAttribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectmammary glanden_US
dc.subjectbreast milken_US
dc.subjecthuman milk oligosaccharides (HMOs)en_US
dc.subjecthuman milk microbiomeen_US
dc.subjectlactationen_US
dc.subjectprobioticen_US
dc.subjectentero-mammary pathwayen_US
dc.titleBreast Milk, a Source of Beneficial Microbes and Associated Benefits for Infant Healthen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041039
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Agriculture, Food and the Marineen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Irelanden_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber15F721en_US
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage1039
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-24T15:54:16Z


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