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dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Erinn M.
dc.contributor.authorSlattery, Helen
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Dan
dc.contributor.authorJoshi, Lokesh
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Rita M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-28T16:26:03Z
dc.date.available2020-07-28T16:26:03Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-17
dc.identifier.citationQuinn, E.M.; Slattery, H.; Walsh, D.; Joshi, L.; Hickey, R.M. Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 and Goat Milk Oligosaccharides Show Synergism In Vitro as Anti-Infectives against Campylobacter jejuni. Foods 2020, 9, 348. doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030348en_US
dc.identifier.issn2304-8158
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2203
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractBifidobacteria are known to inhibit, compete with and displace the adhesion of pathogens to human intestinal cells. Previously, we demonstrated that goat milk oligosaccharides (GMO) increased the attachment of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 to intestinal cells in vitro. In this study, we aimed to exploit this effect as a mechanism for inhibiting pathogen association with intestinal cells. We examined the synergistic effect of GMO-treated B. infantis on preventing the attachment of a highly invasive strain of Campylobacter jejuni to intestinal HT-29 cells. The combination decreased the adherence of C. jejuni to the HT-29 cells by an average of 42% compared to the control (non-GMO treated B. infantis). Increasing the incubation time of the GMO with the Bifidobacterium strain resulted in the strain metabolizing the GMO, correlating with a subsequent 104% increase in growth over a 24 h period when compared to the control. Metabolite analysis in the 24 h period also revealed increased production of acetate, lactate, formate and ethanol by GMO-treated B. infantis. Statistically significant changes in the GMO profile were also demonstrated over the 24 h period, indicating that the strain was digesting certain structures within the pool such as lactose, lacto-N-neotetraose, lacto-N-neohexaose 3′-sialyllactose, 6′-sialyllactose, sialyllacto-N-neotetraose c and disialyllactose. It may be that early exposure to GMO modulates the adhesion of B. infantis while carbohydrate utilisation becomes more important after the bacteria have transiently colonised the host cells in adequate numbers. This study builds a strong case for the use of synbiotics that incorporate oligosaccharides sourced from goat′s milk and probiotic bifidobacteria in functional foods, particularly considering the growing popularity of formulas based on goat milk.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFoods;vol 9
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectBifidobacteriumen_US
dc.subjectCampylobacteren_US
dc.subjectadhesionen_US
dc.subjectmilk oligosaccharidesen_US
dc.subjectsynbioticsen_US
dc.subjectHT-29 cellsen_US
dc.titleBifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 and Goat Milk Oligosaccharides Show Synergism In Vitro as Anti-Infectives against Campylobacter jejunien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030348
dc.contributor.sponsorTeagasc Walsh Fellowship Programmeen_US
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage348
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-28T16:26:03Z


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