Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDygico, Lionel Kenneth
dc.contributor.authorGahan, Cormac G.M.
dc.contributor.authorGrogan, Helen
dc.contributor.authorBurgess, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-20T16:03:49Z
dc.date.available2020-08-20T16:03:49Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-16
dc.identifier.citationDygico, L. K., Gahan, C. G. M., Grogan, H., Burgess, C. M. The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to form biofilm on surfaces relevant to the mushroom production environment, International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2020, 317,108385. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2019.108385en_US
dc.identifier.issn0168-1605
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2308
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractDue to its ubiquitous nature, Listeria monocytogenes is a threat to all fresh fruits and vegetables, including mushrooms, which are Ireland's largest horticultural crop. Although fresh cultivated mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) have not been previously linked with listeriosis outbreaks, the pathogen still poses a threat to the industry, particularly due to its ability to form biofilms. This threat is highlighted by the multiple recalls of mushroom products caused by L. monocytogenes contamination and by previous studies demonstrating that L. monocytogenes is present in the mushroom production environment. In this study, the biofilm formation potential of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from the mushroom production environment was investigated on materials and at temperatures relevant to mushroom production. A preliminary assessment of biofilm formation of 73 mushroom industry isolates was undertaken using a crystal violet assay on polystyrene microtitre plates. The biofilm formation of a subset (n = 7) of these strains was then assessed on twelve different materials, including materials that are representative of the materials commonly found in the mushroom production environments, using the CDC biofilm reactor. Vertical scanning interferometry was used to determine the surface roughness of the chosen materials. All the strains tested using the CDC biofilm reactor were able to form biofilms on the different surfaces tested but material type was found to be a key determining factor on the levels of biofilm formed. Stainless steel, aluminium, rubber, polypropylene and polycarbonate were all able to support biofilm levels in the range of 4–4.9 log10 CFU/cm2, for seven different L. monocytogenes strains. Mushroom industry-specific materials, including growing nets and tarpaulins, were found to support biofilms levels between 4.7 and 6.7 log10 CFU/cm2. Concrete was found to be of concern as it supported 7.7 log10 CFU/cm2 of biofilm for the same strains; however, sealing the concrete resulted in an approximately 2-log reduction in biofilm levels. The surface roughness of the materials varied greatly between the materials (0.7–3.5 log10 Ra) and was found to have a positive correlation with biofilm formation (rs = 0.573) although marginally significant (P = 0.051). The results of this study indicate that L. monocytogenes can readily form biofilms on mushroom industry relevant surfaces, and additionally identifies surfaces of specific concern, where rigorous cleaning and disinfection is required.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Journal of Food Microbiology;317
dc.rightsAttribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectListeria monocytogenesen_US
dc.subjectBiofilmen_US
dc.subjectMushroom industryen_US
dc.titleThe ability of Listeria monocytogenes to form biofilm on surfaces relevant to the mushroom production environmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.embargo.terms2021-03-16en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2019.108385
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Agriculture, Food and the Marineen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber14F881en_US
dc.source.volume317
dc.source.beginpage108385


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Dygico 2020 final version_biof ...
Size:
1.237Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States