Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNewton, J.E.
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Donagh
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-11T17:30:06Z
dc.date.available2021-01-11T17:30:06Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-07
dc.identifier.citationNewton JE, Berry DP. On-farm net benefit of genotyping candidate female replacement cattle and sheep. animal 2020;14(8):1565-1575; doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1751731120000208en_US
dc.identifier.issn1751-7311
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2361
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractThe net benefit from investing in any technology is a function of the cost of implementation and the expected return in revenue. The objective of the present study was to quantify, using deterministic equations, the net monetary benefit from investing in genotyping of commercial females. Three case studies were presented reflecting dairy cows, beef cows and ewes based on Irish population parameters; sensitivity analyses were also performed. Parameters considered in the sensitivity analyses included the accuracy of genomic evaluations, replacement rate, proportion of female selection candidates retained as replacements, the cost of genotyping, the sire parentage error rate and the age of the female when it first gave birth. Results were presented as an annualised monetary net benefit over the lifetime of an individual, after discounting for the timing of expressions. In the base scenarios, the net benefit was greatest for dairy, followed by beef and then sheep. The net benefit improved as the reliability of the genomic evaluations improved and, in fact, a negative net benefit of genotyping was less frequent when the reliability of the genomic evaluations was high. The impact of a 10% point increase in genomic reliability was, however, greatest in sheep, followed by beef and then dairy. The net benefit of genotyping female selection candidates reduced as replacement rate increased. As genotyping costs increased, the net benefit reduced irrespective of the percentage of selection candidates kept, the replacement rate or even the population considered. Nonetheless, the association between the genotyping cost and the net benefit of genotyping differed by the percentage of selection candidates kept. Across all replacement rates evaluated, retaining 25% of the selection candidates resulted in the greatest net benefit when genotyping cost was low but the lowest net benefit when genotyping cost was high. Genotyping breakeven cost was non-linearly associated with the percentage of selection candidates retained, reaching a maximum when 50% of selection candidates were retained, irrespective of replacement rate, genomic reliability or the population. The genotyping breakeven cost was also non-linearly associated with replacement rate. The approaches outlined within provide the back-end framework for a decision support tool to quantify the net benefit of genotyping, once parameterised by the relevant population metrics.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesanimal;
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectgenomic testen_US
dc.subjectcost-benefiten_US
dc.subjectdairyen_US
dc.subjectbeefen_US
dc.subjectgenotypeen_US
dc.titleOn-farm net benefit of genotyping candidate female replacement cattle and sheepen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.embargo.terms2021-12-07en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1751731120000208
dc.identifier.piiS1751731120000208
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Irelanden_US
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Agriculture, Food and the Marineen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorEuropean Unionen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber16/RC/3835en_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber727213en_US
dc.source.volume14
dc.source.issue8
dc.source.beginpage1565
dc.source.endpage1575
dc.source.journaltitleAnimal


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Newton_berry_ROI_genotyping.pdf
Embargo:
2021-12-07
Size:
923.3Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
main artcile

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record