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dc.contributor.authorO’Connor, Eoin
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Rebecca A.
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Sean
dc.contributor.authorAmini, Aniça
dc.contributor.authorGrogan, Helen
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, David
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-16T08:56:14Z
dc.date.available2021-06-16T08:56:14Z
dc.date.issued2020-06
dc.identifier.citationE. O’Connor, R. A. Owens, S. Doyle, A. Amini, H. Grogan, D. A. Fitzpatrick, Proteomic investigation of interhyphal interactions between strains of Agaricus bisporus, Fungal Biology, 2020, 124 (6), 579-591. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2020.02.011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2427
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractHyphae of filamentous fungi undergo polar extension, bifurcation and hyphal fusion to form reticulating networks of mycelia. Hyphal fusion or anastomosis, a ubiquitous process among filamentous fungi, is a vital strategy for how fungi expand over their substrate and interact with or recognise self- and non-self hyphae of neighbouring mycelia in their environment. Morphological and genetic characterisation of anastomosis has been studied in many model fungal species, but little is known of the direct proteomic response of two interacting fungal isolates. Agaricus bisporus, the most widely cultivated edible mushroom crop worldwide, was used as an in vitro model to profile the proteomes of interacting cultures. The globally cultivated strain (A15) was paired with two distinct strains; a commercial hybrid strain and a wild isolate strain. Each co-culture presented a different interaction ranging from complete vegetative compatibility (self), lack of interactions, and antagonistic interactions. These incompatible strains are the focus of research into disease-resistance in commercial crops as the spread of intracellular pathogens, namely mycoviruses, is limited by the lack of interhyphal anastomosis. Unique proteomic responses were detected between all co-cultures. An array of cell wall modifying enzymes, plus fungal growth and morphogenesis proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.05) altered abundances. Nitrogen metabolism dominated in the intracellular proteome, with evidence of nitrogen starvation between competing, non-compatible cultures. Changes in key enzymes of A. bisporus morphogenesis were observed, particularly via increased abundance of glucanosyltransferase in competing interactions and certain chitinases in vegetative compatible interactions only. Carbohydrate-active enzyme arsenals are expanded in antagonistic interactions in A. bisporus. Pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism and genetic information processing were higher in interacting cultures, most notably during self-recognition. New insights into the differential response of interacting strains of A. bisporus will enhance our understanding of potential barriers to viral transmission through vegetative incompatibility. Our results suggest that a differential proteomic response occurs between A. bisporus at strain-level and findings from this work may guide future proteomic investigation of fungal anastomosis.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipTeagasc
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFungal Biology;124
dc.rights© 2020 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectAnastomosisen_US
dc.subjectButton mushroomen_US
dc.subjectHypha–hypha proteomicsen_US
dc.subjectHyphal-fusionen_US
dc.subjectVegetative incompatibilityen_US
dc.titleProteomic investigation of interhyphal interactions between strains of Agaricus bisporusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.embargo.terms2021/02/28en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2020.02.011
dc.contributor.sponsorTeagasc Walsh Fellowship Programmeen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Irelanden_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber10564231en_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberSFI 12/RI/2346(3)en_US
dc.source.volume124
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage579
dc.source.endpage591
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-28T00:00:00Z
dc.source.journaltitleFungal Biology


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