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dc.contributor.authorFinn, John
dc.contributor.authorMoran, P.
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-23T11:32:37Z
dc.date.available2021-08-23T11:32:37Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-21
dc.identifier.citationFinn JA, Moran P. A pilot study of methodology for the development of farmland habitat reports for sustainability assessments. Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research 2020;59(1):56-69; doi http://dx.doi.org/10.15212/ijafr-2020-0103en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2577
dc.descriptionpeer revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractThe inclusion of farm maps of habitat features is becoming an urgent requirement for assessments of farm-scale sustainability and for compliance or benchmarking with national and international sustainability certification and accreditation schemes. Traditional methods of habitat assessment rely strongly on field-based surveys, which are logistically demanding and relatively costly. We describe and investigate a process that relies on information technology to develop a scalable method that can be applied across multiple farms to reduce the significant logistical challenges and financial costs of traditional habitat surveys. A key impediment to the routine development of farm habitat maps is the lack of information on the type of habitats that occur on a land parcel. Within a pilot project comprising 187 farms, we developed and implemented a process for creating farm habitat reports and investigate the accuracy of visual interpretation of satellite imagery by an ecologist aiming to identify habitat types. We generated customised farm reports that included a colour-coded farm habitat map and habitat information (type, area, relative wildlife importance). Visual assessment of satellite imagery achieved an overall accuracy of 96% in its ability to discriminate between land parcels with habitats categorised by this study as being of either high or low nature conservation value. Assessment of satellite imagery achieved an overall accuracy of 90% in its ability to discriminate among Fossitt level II habitat classes, and an overall accuracy of 81% when using individual habitat classes (Fossitt level III). There was, however, considerable variation in the accuracy associated with individual habitat classes. We conclude that this methodology based on satellite imagery is sufficiently accurate to be used for the incorporation of farmland habitats into farm-scale sustainability assurance, but should, at most, use Fossitt level II habitat classes. We discuss future challenges and opportunities for the development of farm habitat maps and plans for their use in sustainability certification schemes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTeagascen_US
dc.publisherCompuscript Ltd
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIrish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research;Vol. 59
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectfarmland wildlifeen_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.subjecthabitaten_US
dc.subjectmappingen_US
dc.subjectsustainabilityen_US
dc.titleA pilot study of methodology for the development of farmland habitat reports for sustainability assessmentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.15212/ijafr-2020-0103
dc.contributor.sponsorBord Biaen_US
dc.source.volume59
dc.source.issue1
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-23T11:32:38Z
dc.source.journaltitleIrish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research
dc.identifier.eissn0791-6833


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