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dc.contributor.authorRodrigues da Costa, Maria
dc.contributor.authorGarcía Manzanilla, Edgar
dc.contributor.authorDiana, Alessia
dc.contributor.authorvan Staaveren, Nienke
dc.contributor.authorTorres-Pitarch, Alberto
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Laura A
dc.contributor.authorCalderón Díaz, Julia A
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-22T12:38:38Z
dc.date.available2021-12-22T12:38:38Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-11
dc.identifier.citationRodrigues da Costa, M., García Manzanilla, E., Diana, A. et al. Identifying challenges to manage body weight variation in pig farms implementing all-in-all-out management practices and their possible implications for animal health: a case study. Porc Health Manag 7, 10 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40813-021-00190-6en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40813-021-00190-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2734
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Managing body weight (BW) variation is a challenge in farrow-to-finish farms implementing all-in/all-out (AIAO) production systems due to the lack of “off-site” facilities to segregate slow growing pigs (SGP). This case study investigated different approaches to managing BW variation in a farrow-to-finish commercial pig farm with a self-declared AIAO management and the possible implications for animal health. Case presentation A total of 1096 pigs (1047 pigs born within 1 week plus 49 pigs born 1 week later) were tracked until slaughter as they moved through the production stages. Piglets were individually tagged at birth and their location on the farm was recorded on a weekly basis. In total, 10.3% of pigs died during lactation. Four main cohorts of pigs were created at weaning and retrospectively identified: cohort 1 = pigs weaned at 21 days (4.5%); cohort 2 = pigs weaned at 28 days (81.0%), which was sub-divided at the end of the first nursery stage into sub-cohort 2a = pigs split at 3 weeks post-weaning (29.7%); sub-cohort 2b = pigs split at 3 weeks post-weaning from cohort 2a and split again 5 weeks post-weaning (35.5%) and sub-cohort 2c = remaining smaller size pigs from cohort 2b (10.9%); cohort 3 = pigs weaned at 35 days (2.7%) and cohort 4 = pigs weaned at 49 days (1.5%) that were later mixed with SPG, delayed pigs from other cohorts and sick/injured pigs that recovered. Four strategies to manage BW variation were identified: i) earlier weaning (cohort 1); ii) delayed weaning of SGP (cohort 3 and 4); iii) re-grading pens by BW (sub-cohorts 2a, 2b and 2c) and, iv) delayed movement of SGP to the next production stage (several pigs from all cohorts). A higher percentage of delayed pigs presented pericarditis, pleurisy and enzootic pneumonia like lesions at slaughter compared with pigs under other strategies. Conclusion A variety of management practices were implemented to minimise BW variation during the production cycle. However, several cohorts of pigs were created disrupting AIAO management. Earlier weaning should only be practiced under specific circumstances where optimal animal health and welfare are guaranteed. Delayed weaning of SGP and delaying pigs to move to the next production stage could negatively affect animal health and should be avoided.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBiomed Centralen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPorcine Health Management;
dc.subjectAnimal movementsen_US
dc.subjectDelayed pigsen_US
dc.subjectEarly weaningen_US
dc.subjectPig sortingen_US
dc.subjectProduction flowen_US
dc.subjectSwineen_US
dc.titleIdentifying challenges to manage body weight variation in pig farms implementing all-in-all-out management practices and their possible implications for animal health: a case studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2021-01-17T05:10:06Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40813-021-00190-6
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Agriculture, Food and the Marineen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorTeagasc Walsh Fellowship Programmeen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber14/S/832en_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberPDPG-6666en_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberPDPG-6497en_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberPDPG-6671.en_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber11/S/107en_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-12-22T12:38:39Z


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