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dc.contributor.authorRahman, Atikur
dc.contributor.authorDoohan, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorMullins, Ewen
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-15T14:33:29Z
dc.date.available2022-02-15T14:33:29Z
dc.date.issued2020-06
dc.identifier.citationQuantification of In Planta Zymoseptoria tritici Progression Through Different Infection Phases and Related Association with Components of Aggressiveness Atikur Rahman, Fiona Doohan, and Ewen Mullins Phytopathology® 2020 110:6, 1208-1215. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-09-19-0339-Ren_US
dc.identifier.issn0031-949X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2781
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractIn planta growth of Zymoseptoria tritici, causal agent of Septoria tritici blotch of wheat, during the infection process has remained an understudied topic due to the long symptomless latent period before the emergence of fruiting bodies. In this study, we attempted to understand the relationship between in planta growth of Z. tritici relative to the primary components of aggressiveness, i.e., latent period and pycnidia coverage in regard to contrasting host resistance. We tested isolates collected from Ireland against the susceptible cultivar Gallant and cultivar Stigg, which has strong partial resistance. A clear isolate−host interaction effect (F = 3.018; P = 0.005, and F = 6.008; P < 0.001) for latent period and pycnidia coverage, respectively, was identified. Furthermore, during the early infection phase of latency from 5 to 11 days postinoculation (dpi), in planta growth rate of fungal biomass was significantly (F = 30.06; P < 0.001) more affected by host resistance than isolate specificity (F = 1.27; P = 0.27), indicating the importance of host resistance in the early infection phase. In planta Z. tritici growth rates in cultivar Gallant spiked between 11 and 16 dpi followed by a continuous fall onward, whereas in cultivar Stigg it was slowly progressive in nature. From correlation and regression analysis, we found that the in planta growth rate preceding the average latent period of cultivar Gallant has more influence on latency duration and pycnidia production. Likewise, correlation between component of aggressiveness and in planta growth rate of pathogen supports our understanding of aggressiveness to be driven by the pathogen’s multiplication capacity within host tissue.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipH2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherScientific Societiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPhytopathology;
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectwheaten_US
dc.subjectSeptoria tritici blotchen_US
dc.subjectquantitative polymerase chain reactionen_US
dc.subjectaggressivenessen_US
dc.subjectwheat_Zymoseptoria interactionen_US
dc.subjectlatent perioden_US
dc.subjectpycnidia coverageen_US
dc.subjectdisease severityen_US
dc.titleQuantification of In Planta Zymoseptoria tritici Progression Through Different Infection Phases and Related Association with Components of Aggressivenessen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-09-19-0339-R
dc.identifier.pii10.1094/PHYTO-09-19-0339-R
dc.contributor.sponsorEuropean Unionen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber674964en_US
dc.source.volume110
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage1208
dc.source.endpage1215
refterms.dateFOA2022-02-15T14:33:30Z
dc.source.journaltitlePhytopathology®
dc.identifier.eissn1943-7684


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