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dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorDhubháin, Áine Ní
dc.contributor.authorShort, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-16T14:32:30Z
dc.date.available2022-11-16T14:32:30Z
dc.date.issued2022-12
dc.identifier.citationRachel Irwin, Áine Ní Dhubháin, Ian Short, Irish dairy and drystock farmers’ attitudes and perceptions to planting trees and adopting agroforestry practices on their land, Environmental Challenges, 2022, 9, 100636. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envc.2022.100636en_US
dc.identifier.issn2667-0100
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/2869
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractDue to the intensification of agriculture and transition to monoculture plantations, vast areas of native woodland have been lost from the Irish landscape. As these trees gradually vanished from agricultural land, the use of traditional, ancient agroforestry practices dwindled. Currently, forestry cover in Ireland is 25% lower than the European average, with the rate of afforestation remaining critically low. Agroforestry has been cited as a means to increase forestry cover in Ireland while continuing to produce viable high quality agricultural products on the same parcel of land. However, even with a range of afforestation schemes available, farmers exhibit an evident reluctance to adopt agroforestry. This research aimed to examine the main attitudes and perceptions of Irish dairy and drystock farmers to planting trees on their land and adopting agroforestry practices. The majority of farmers included within the dataset exhibited a positive attitude towards trees on their farms, with the main negative behavioural beliefs relating to impacts on pasture. Family and Teagasc (The Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority) are the highest cited influential bodies while the majority of farmers exhibit high perceived behavioural control. Intention rates to plant trees are high, albeit mainly on marginal areas of the farm. Agroforestry knowledge is low in Ireland with the word itself eliciting negative responses amongst the farming community. The results provide a comprehensive understanding of the main attitudes, influential bodies and barriers that affect agroforestry uptake in Ireland.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipTeagasc
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEnvironmental Challenges;
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgroforestryen_US
dc.subjectFarmer decision makingen_US
dc.subjectTheory of Planned Behaviouren_US
dc.subjectIrelanden_US
dc.subjectelicitation studyen_US
dc.titleIrish dairy and drystock farmers’ attitudes and perceptions to planting trees and adopting agroforestry practices on their landen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.envc.2022.100636
dc.identifier.piiS2667010022001925
dc.contributor.sponsorTeagasc Walsh Scholarship Programmeen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber2020026en_US
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.beginpage100636
dc.source.journaltitleEnvironmental Challenges


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