• Deriving economic values for national sheep breeding objectives using a bio-economic model

      Bohan, Alan; Shalloo, Laurence; Creighton, Philip; Berry, Donagh; Boland, T. M.; O'Brien, Aine; Pabiou, Thierry; Wall, E.; McDermott, Kevin; McHugh, Noirin; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-05-27)
      The economic value of a trait in a breeding objective can be defined as the value of a unit change in an individual trait, while keeping all other traits constant and are widely used in the development of breeding objectives internationally. The objective of this study was to provide a description of the development of economic values for the pertinent traits included in the Irish national sheep breeding objectives using a whole farm system bio-economic model. A total of fourteen traits of economic importance representing maternal, lambing, production and health characteristics were calculated within a whole farm bio-economic model. The model was parameterised to represent an average Irish flock of 107 ewes with a mean lambing date in early March, stocked at 7.5 ewes per hectare and weaning 1.5 lambs per ewe joined to the ram. The economic values (units in parenthesis) calculated for maternal traits were: €39.76 for number of lambs born (per lamb), €0.12 for ewe mature weight cull value (per kg), −€0.57 for ewe mature weight maintenance value (per kg), −€0.09 for ewe mature weight replacement value (per kg) and −€0.84 for ewe replacement rate (per%). The economic values calculated for lambing traits were: €54.84 for lamb surviving at birth (per lamb), −€0.27 and −€0.30 for direct lambing difficulty in single and multiple-bearing ewes, respectively (per%); the corresponding values for maternal single and multiple lambing difficulty (per%) were −€0.25 and −€0.27, respectively. The calculated economic values for production traits were: −€0.25 for days to slaughter (per day), €3.70 for carcass Conformation (per EUROP grade) and −€0.84 for carcass fat (per fat score). The economic values for health traits were: −€0.24 for ewe lameness (per%), −€0.08 for lamb lameness (per%), −€0.25 for mastitis (per%), −€0.34 for dag score (per dag score) and −€0.08 for faecal egg count (per 50 eggs/g). Within the two Irish breeding objectives, the terminal and replacement breeding objective, the greatest emphasis was placed on production traits across both the terminal (62.56%) and replacement (41.65%) breeding objectives. The maternal and lambing traits accounted for the 34.19% and 23.45% of the emphasis within the replacement breeding objective, respectively. Results from this study will enable the implementation of new economic values within the national terminal and replacement Irish sheep breeding objectives which highlights the traits of importance for increasing overall farm profitability.
    • Inter- and intra-reproducibility of genotypes from sheep technical replicates on Illumina and Affymetrix platforms

      Berry, Donagh; O'Brien, Aine; Wall, E.; McDermott, Kevin; Randles, Shane; Flynn, Paul; Park, Stephen D. E.; Grose, Jenny; Weld, Rebecca; McHugh, Noirin; et al. (Biomed Central, 2016-11-10)
      Background Accurate genomic analyses are predicated upon access to accurate genotype input data. The objective of this study was to quantify the reproducibility of genotype data that are generated from the same genotype platform and from different genotyping platforms. Methods Genotypes based on 51,121 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for 84 animals that were each genotyped on Illumina and Affymetrix platforms and for another 25 animals that were each genotyped twice on the same Illumina platform were compared. Genotypes based on 11,323 SNPs for an additional 21 animals that were genotyped on two different Illumina platforms by two different service providers were also compared. Reproducibility of the results was measured as the correlation between allele counts and as genotype and allele concordance rates. Results A mean within-animal correlation of 0.9996 was found between allele counts in the 25 duplicate samples that were genotyped on the same Illumina platform and varied from 0.9963 to 1.0000 per animal. The mean (minimum, maximum) genotype and allele concordance rates per animal between the 25 duplicate samples were equal to 0.9996 (0.9968, 1.0000) and 0.9993 (0.9937, 1.0000), respectively. The concordance rate between the two different Illumina platforms was also near 1. A mean within-animal correlation of 0.9738 was found between genotypes that were generated on the Illumina and Affymetrix platforms and varied from 0.9505 to 0.9812 per animal. The mean (minimum, maximum) within-animal genotype and allele concordance rates between the Illumina and Affymetrix platforms were equal to 0.9711 (0.9418, 0.9798) and 0.9845 (0.9695, 0.9889), respectively. The genotype concordance rate across all genotypes increased from 0.9711 to 0.9949 when the SNPs used were restricted to those with three high-resolution genotype clusters which represented 75.2% of the called genotypes. Conclusions and implications Our results suggest that, regardless of the genotype platform or service provider, high genotype concordance rates are achieved especially if they are restricted to high-quality extracted DNA and SNPs that result in high-quality genotypes.