• Demographics of cattle positive for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis by faecal culture, from submissions to the Cork Regional Veterinary Laboratory

      Richardson, Esther K. B.; Mee, John F; Sánchez-Miguel, C; Crilly, Jim; More, Simon J (Biomed Central, 2009-06-01)
      The demography of bovine infections caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Ireland is poorly defined. The objective of this study was to describe the demographics of cattle positive to MAP on faecal culture, based on submissions to the Cork Regional Veterinary Laboratory (Cork RVL) from 1994 to 2006. The study focused on all available faecal samples from adult cattle with non-responsive chronic diarrhoea that were submitted by private veterinary practitioners to Cork RVL for MAP culture. For each MAP-positive by faecal culture animal, data were collated from Cork RVL and Cattle Movement Monitoring Scheme (CMMS) records. Johne's disease (JD) was confirmed in 110 animals from 86 herds by the Cork RVL between 1994 and 2006, with a rate of positive cases between 15% and 18% over last four years of the study. Two breeds (Holstein/Friesian or Limousin) made up 78% of submissions. Movements were assessed for the 57 study animals with available movement information, 90% died within one year of the test and 26% tested positive in the herd they were born into. The study provides preliminary information about movement trends and demographics of animals with MAP positive submissions. Although the study area is restricted, it includes the most intensive (and economically-important) dairy region in Ireland. The demographics of JD infection from the study area are in agreement with international reports. Further work is required to determine demographic trends, incidence and prevalence of JD throughout Ireland. It is hoped this work may contribute to the development of a surveillance strategy for MAP by regional veterinary laboratories.
    • Epidemiology and economic impact of Johne's disease in Irish dairy herds

      Mee, John F; Richardson, Esther K. B. (Teagasc, 2008-07-01)
      This project addressed two aspects of an emerging infectious disease of Irish cattle; the epidemiology and the economic impacts of Johne’s disease (paratuberculosis). Though this disease has been present in Irish cattle herds for decades, only since the introduction of the Single European Market in 1992 has it become more widespread. In addition to this change in the epidemiology of the disease in Irish cattle, there is increasing evidence that the causative organism, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) may be implicated in a human illness, Crohn’s disease, though proof of a zoonotic link is currently disputed (Tremblay, 2004). Against this background a collaborative research project was set up by Teagasc and funded by Irish dairy farmers.
    • Paratuberculosis sero-status and milk production, SCC and calving interval in Irish dairy herds

      Hoogendam, K; Richardson, Esther K. B.; Mee, John F (Biomed Central, 2009-04-01)
      The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of paratuberculosis sero-status on milk yield, fat, protein, somatic cell count and calving interval in Irish dairy herds. Serum from all animals over 12 months of age (n = 2,602) in 34 dairy herds was tested for antibodies to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis using an ELISA. Herds were categorised by sero-status into positive, non-negative and negative, where a positive herd contained two or more positive cows, a non-negative herd contained only one positive cow and a negative herd contained no positive cows. Data at animal, parity and herd-level were analysed by multiple regression using general linear models. Positive herds (mean herd size = 129 cows) and non-negative herds (81 cows) were larger than negative herds (72 cows) (P < 0.01). Negative herds had the highest economic breeding index (EBI), while positive herds had the highest estimated breeding value (EBV) for milk yield. There was no significant effect of paratuberculosis sero-status at animal, parity or herd-level on milk yield, milk fat or protein production, somatic cell count score (SCCS) or calving interval. Negative herds tended to have a lower SCCS than positive and nonnegative herds (P = 0.087). This study only examined the effects of paratuberculosis sero-status but did not examine the clinical effects of Johne's disease at the farm or dairy industry levels.