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dc.contributor.authorWalshe, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorDuggan, Vivienne
dc.contributor.authorCabrera-Rubio, Raul
dc.contributor.authorCrispie, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorCotter, Paul
dc.contributor.authorFeehan, Orna
dc.contributor.authorMulcahy, Grace
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-09T16:01:16Z
dc.date.available2023-11-09T16:01:16Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-31
dc.identifier.citationNicola Walshe, Vivienne Duggan, Raul Cabrera-Rubio, Fiona Crispie, Paul Cotter, Orna Feehan, Grace Mulcahy, Removal of adult cyathostomins alters faecal microbiota and promotes an inflammatory phenotype in horses, International Journal for Parasitology, Volume 49, Issue 6, 2019, Pages 489-500, ISSN 0020-7519, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2019.02.003.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/3396
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractThe interactions between parasitic helminths and gut microbiota are considered to be an important, although as yet incompletely understood, factor in the regulation of immunity, inflammation and a range of diseases. Infection with intestinal helminths is ubiquitous in grazing horses, with cyathostomins (about 50 species of which are recorded) predominating. Consequences of infection include both chronic effects, and an acute inflammatory syndrome, acute larval cyathostominosis, which sometimes follows removal of adult helminths by administration of anthelmintic drugs. The presence of cyathostomins as a resident helminth population of the equine gut (the “helminthome”) provides an opportunity to investigate the effect helminth infection, and its perturbation, has on both the immune system and bacterial microbiome of the gut, as well as to determine the specific mechanisms of pathophysiology involved in equine acute larval cyathostominosis. We studied changes in the faecal microbiota of two groups of horses following treatment with anthelmintics (fenbendazole or moxidectin). We found decreases in both alpha diversity and beta diversity of the faecal microbiota at Day 7 post-treatment, which were reversed by Day 14. These changes were accompanied by increases in inflammatory biomarkers. The general pattern of faecal microbiota detected was similar to that seen in the relatively few equine gut microbiome studies reported to date. We conclude that interplay between resident cyathostomin populations and the bacterial microbiota of the equine large intestine is important in maintaining homeostasis and that disturbance of this ecology can lead to gut dysbiosis and play a role in the aetiology of inflammatory conditions in the horse, including acute larval cyathostominosis.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Journal for Parasitology;Vol 49
dc.rights© 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Australian Society for Parasitology.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectHelminthsen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiotaen_US
dc.subjectHorsesen_US
dc.subjectCyathostominsen_US
dc.subjectStongylesen_US
dc.subjectAnthelminticsen_US
dc.subjectDysbiosisen_US
dc.titleRemoval of adult cyathostomins alters faecal microbiota and promotes an inflammatory phenotype in horsesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2019.02.003
dc.contributor.sponsorVeterinary Council of Irelanden_US
dc.contributor.sponsorUniversity College Dublin, Ireland, Horizon Scanning granten_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberSF 1604en_US
dc.source.volume49
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage489
dc.source.endpage500
refterms.dateFOA2023-11-09T16:01:17Z
dc.source.journaltitleInternational Journal for Parasitology


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© 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Australian Society for Parasitology.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Australian Society for Parasitology.