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dc.contributor.authorMcGurrin, Ailbhe
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Julie
dc.contributor.authorTiwari, Brijesh K.
dc.contributor.authorGarcia-Vaquero, Marco
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-29T13:58:57Z
dc.date.available2024-02-29T13:58:57Z
dc.date.issued2023-12-02
dc.identifier.citationMcGurrin, A., Maguire, J., Tiwari, B.K. et al. Anti-methanogenic potential of seaweeds and seaweed-derived compounds in ruminant feed: current perspectives, risks and future prospects. J Animal Sci Biotechnol 14, 145 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40104-023-00946-wen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/3691
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_US
dc.description.abstractAbstract With methane emissions from ruminant agriculture contributing 17% of total methane emissions worldwide, there is increasing urgency to develop strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in this sector. One of the proposed strategies is ruminant feed intervention studies focused on the inclusion of anti-methanogenic compounds which are those capable of interacting with the rumen microbiome, reducing the capacity of ruminal microorganisms to produce methane. Recently, seaweeds have been investigated for their ability to reduce methane in ruminants in vitro and in vivo, with the greatest methane abatement reported when using the red seaweed Asparagopsis taxiformis (attributed to the bromoform content of this species). From the literature analysis in this study, levels of up to 99% reduction in ruminant methane emissions have been reported from inclusion of this seaweed in animal feed, although further in vivo and microbiome studies are required to confirm these results as other reports showed no effect on methane emission resulting from the inclusion of seaweed to basal feed. This review explores the current state of research aiming to integrate seaweeds as anti-methanogenic feed additives, as well as examining the specific bioactive compounds within seaweeds that are likely to be related to these effects. The effects of the inclusion of seaweeds on the ruminal microbiome are also reviewed, as well as the future challenges when considering the large-scale inclusion of seaweeds into ruminant diets as anti-methanogenic agents.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBiomed Centralen_US
dc.subjectAsparagopsisen_US
dc.subjectBromoformen_US
dc.subjectMethanogenesisen_US
dc.subjectPhlorotanninen_US
dc.subjectSaponinen_US
dc.subjectTanninen_US
dc.titleAnti-methanogenic potential of seaweeds and seaweed-derived compounds in ruminant feed: current perspectives, risks and future prospectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2023-12-03T04:09:36Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40104-023-00946-w
dc.contributor.sponsorIrish Research Council Enterprise Partnership Scheme Postgraduate Scholarshipen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorBlueBio ERA-NETen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberEPSPG/2021/154en_US
refterms.dateFOA2024-02-29T13:58:59Z


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