• Mid-infrared spectroscopy as an alternative to laboratory extraction for the determination of lime requirement in tillage soils

      Metzger, Konrad; Zhang, Chaosheng; Ward, Mark; Daly, Karen; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Department for Agriculture Food and the Marine; RMIS 6837; 15/ICTAGRI 2 (Elsevier BV, 2020-04)
      Lime is a crucial soil conditioner to bring agricultural soils to optimum pH values for nutrient availability. Lime recommendations are typically determined in laboratory extractions, the most common being the “Shoemaker- McLean and Pratt” (SMP) buffer method, that requires carcinogenic reagents soon to be abolished under the EU legislation. As an alternative to wet chemistry, mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy has shown to be a cost-and time effective method at predicting soil properties. The capability and feasibility of diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to predict lime requirement (LR) in tillage fields is examined. Samples from 41 cereal tillage fields (n = 655) are used to build a calibration for DRIFTS using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The samples were split into calibration set (31 fields, n=495) and validation set (10 fields, n= 160). After preprocessing with trim, smoothing and standard normal variate, a calibration model using 6 latent variables, provided R2 of 0.89 and root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 1.56 t/ha. Prediction of all fields from the validation set resulted in R2 of 0.76 and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.68 t/ ha. The predictions of the single fields ranged from R2 values of 0.41 to 0.72, RMSEP of 0.48 to 4.2 t/ha and ratios of performance to inter-quartile distance (RPIQ) of 0.45 to 3.56. It was shown that the signals of soil constituents having an influence on the LR were picked up in the spectra and were identified in the loading weights of the PLSR. While the error is too high to predict the variability of LR within the field, MIR prediction using field averages provided a viable alternative to current laboratory methods for blanket spreading of lime on tillage fields.