• Protocols and strategies to study the migration of veterinary drug residues into milk and dairy products in licensed trials

      Power, C.; Sayers, Riona; O'Brien, Bernadette; Furey, A.; Danaher, Martin; Jordan, Kieran (Teagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Ireland, 2013)
      In the interest of animal welfare, and in order that the results from animal trials are considered valid for inclusion in the development of regulations, it is necessary that such trials are undertaken in accordance with the appropriate licensing arrangements. In January 2013, new licensing arrangements were introduced in the European Union. The aim of this paper is to outline the legislative strategy required for obtaining licences for animal trials and based on live animal trials with flukicides, establishes a blueprint for obtaining the appropriate licences and undertaking the experiments.
    • Review of studies on flukicide residues in cows’ milk and their transfer to dairy products

      Power, C.; Sayers, Riona; O'Brien, Bernadette; Furey, A.; Danaher, Martin; Kieran, Jordan; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Teagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Ireland, 2013)
      Flukicides are widely used to treat infestations of liver fluke in dairy cattle. This could result in flukicide residues in milk if animals are improperly treated or if withdrawal periods are not properly observed. The purpose of this review is to summarise the results of studies on depletion of flukicides from milk and the transfer of flukicide residues to dairy products, if present in the milk. As the depletion of flukicide residues from milk of animals treated during lactation was relatively slow, the studies support the view that the dry period (when milk is not being used for human consumption) is the most suitable time for flukicide treatment. Migration of residues to product occurred at different rates, depending on the drug in question. Generally, concentration of flukicides occurred in cheese, butter and skim milk powder. Pasteurisation or heat treatment during spray drying had no impact in reducing residues.