• Complexes between linoleate and native or aggregated β-lactoglobulin: Interaction parameters and in vitro cytotoxic effect.

      Le Maux, Solene; Bouhallab, Said; Giblin, Linda; Brodkorb, Andre; Croguennec, Thomas; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Irish Research Council for Science, Engineering and Technology; 08/RD/TMFRC/650 (Elsevier, 2013-11)
      Iron is essential for human health, but it sometimes causes an unpleasant taste, rusty colour and a decrease in the stability of food products. Previously, we found that ethanol-treated yeast (ETY) cells could remove iron from wine and juice, and reduce the fishy aftertaste induced by iron in wine–seafood pairings. However, the mechanism of iron sorption by ETY cells is undefined; thus, there is no indicator that can be used to estimate the iron sorption capacity of these cells. In this study, we showed that cell wall components are not mainly associated with iron sorption by investigating ETY cells with the cell wall removed. Moreover, plasma membrane permeability was correlated with the iron sorbing capacity of the cells. Microscopic analysis showed that iron accumulated within ETY cells. Proteinase-treated ETY cells had no iron sorbing capacity. On the basis of these results, we conclude that intracellular proteins are involved in iron sorption by ETY cells.
    • The cytotoxicity of fatty acid/α-lactalbumin complexes depends on the amount and type of fatty acid

      Brinkman, Christel Rothe; Brodkorb, Andre; Thiel, Steffen; Kehoe, Joseph James; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 08RDTMFRC650 (Wiley, 17/04/2013)
      Complexes of the milk protein, α-lactalbumin, and the fatty acid, oleic acid, have previously been shown to be cytotoxic. Complexes of α-lactalbumin and five different fatty acids (vaccenic, linoleic, palmitoleic, stearic, and elaidic acid) were prepared and compared to those formed with oleic acid. All complexes were cytotoxic to human promyelocytic leukemia-derived (HL-60) cells but to different degrees depending on the fatty acid. The amount of fatty acid per α-lactalbumin molecule was found to correlate with the cytotoxicity; the higher the number of fatty acids per protein, the more cytotoxic the complex. Importantly, all the tested fatty acids were also found to be cytotoxic on their own in a concentration dependent manner. The cytotoxic effect of complexes between α-lactalbumin and linoleic acid, vaccenic acid, or oleic acid was further investigated using flow cytometry and found to induce cell death resembling apoptosis on Jurkat cells. Practical applications: Cytotoxic complexes of α-lactalbumin and several different fatty acids could be produced. The cytotoxicity of all the variants is similar to that previously determined for α-lactalbumin/oleic acid complexes.
    • Heat-induced Maillard reaction of the tripeptide IPP and ribose: Structural characterization and implication on bioactivity

      Jiang, Zhanmei; Rai, Dilip K.; O'Connor, Paula M.; Brodkorb, Andre; National Natural Science Foundation of China; Innovative Research Team of Higher Education of Heilongjiang Province (Elsevier, 28/09/2012)
      Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were prepared from aqueous model mixtures containing 60 g L− 1 ribose and 30 g L− 1 of the bioactive tripeptide IPP (Ile-Pro-Pro), heated at 98 °C. MRP and associated reactions with changes in IPP were observed within one hour of heat-treatment. The pH of MRPs decreased significantly during the heat treatment of IPP–ribose mixtures from 9.0 to 7.6 after one hour. The amino group content, IPP and ribose concentration decreased significantly during heat treatment. The fluorescence intensity of the IPP–ribose MRPs reached the maximum within 2 h. Modification of the UV/vis spectra for IPP–ribose MRPs was mainly due to a condensation reaction of IPP with ribose. Compounds with molecular weight between 300 and 650 Da were dominant while compounds smaller than 250 Da were also produced during the reactions, as characterized by size exclusion chromatography. Mass spectrometry revealed that IPP was conjugated to ribose at the N-terminal (m/z of 458.3) upon heat-treatment. The presence of ribose also promoted peptide degradation to dehydrated IP (m/z of 211.1). IPP–ribose MRPs lost the known angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of IPP; however, strong antioxidant properties were detected.
    • Oral Delivery of Nisin in Resistant Starch Based Matrices Alters the Gut Microbiota in Mice

      Gough, Ronan; Cabrera-Rubio, Raul; O'Connor, Paula M.; Crispie, Fiona; Brodkorb, Andre; Miao, Song; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Cotter, Paul D.; Nilaweera, Kanishka; et al. (Frontiers, 2018-06-15)
      There is a growing recognition of the role the gastrointestinal microbiota plays in health and disease. Ingested antimicrobial proteins and peptides have the potential to alter the gastrointestinal microbiota; particularly if protected from digestion. Nisin is an antimicrobial peptide that is used as a food preservative. This study examined the ability of nisin to affect the murine microbiota when fed to mice in two different starch based matrices; a starch dough comprising raw starch granules and a starch gel comprising starch that was gelatinized and retrograded. The effects of the two starch matrices by themselves on the microbiota were also examined. Following 16S rRNA compositional sequencing, beta diversity analysis highlighted a significant difference (p = 0.001, n = 10) in the murine microbiota between the four diet groups. The differences between the two nisin containing diets were mainly attributable to differences in the nisin release from the starch matrices while the differences between the carriers were mainly attributable to the type of resistant starch they possessed. Indeed, the differences in the relative abundance of several genera in the mice consuming the starch dough and starch gel diets, in particular Akkermansia, the relative abundance of which was 0.5 and 11.9%, respectively (p = 0.0002, n = 10), points to the potential value of resistance starch as a modulator of beneficial gut microbes. Intact nisin and nisin digestion products (in particular nisin fragment 22–31) were detected in the feces and the nisin was biologically active. However, despite a three-fold greater consumption of nisin in the group fed the nisin in starch dough diet, twice as much nisin was detected in the feces of the group which consumed the nisin in starch gel diet. In addition, the relative abundance of three times as many genera from the lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) were significantly different (p < 0.001, n = 10) to the control for the group fed the nisin in starch gel diet, implying that the starch gel afforded a degree of protection from digestion to the nisin entrapped within it.
    • Simulated gastrointestinal digestion of nisin and interaction between nisin and bile

      Gough, Ronan; O'Connor, Paula M.; Rea, Mary; Gomez-Sala, Beatriz; Miao, Song; Hill, Colin; Brodkorb, Andre; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 10/RD/TMFRC/701 (Elsevier, 2017-08-14)
      Nisin, an antimicrobial peptide showing activity against many Gram positive bacteria, is widely used as a food preservative. The simulated gastrointestinal digestion of nisin (variant A) was studied using the in vitro INFOGEST digestion method. Following oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion, there was no intact nisin in the system and the nisin was primarily digested by pancreatin. After digestion, six nisin fragments (1–11, 1–12, 1–20, 1–21, 1–29 and 1–32) were identified by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy and four of these nisin fragments (1–20, 1–21, 1–29 and 1–32) demonstrated low antibacterial activity against Lactococcus lactis HP in agar diffusion activity assays. Additionally, it was observed that bile salts form a complex with nisin. This was examined by atomic force microscopy, turbidity and dynamic light scattering, which showed that this interaction resulted in significantly larger bile salt micelles. The presence of bile salts at physiological levels significantly altered the relative amounts of the nisin fragments 1–12, 1–20 and 1–29 produced during an in vitro digestion. This study highlights the importance of including bile in simulated digestions of antimicrobial peptides in order to obtain a more accurate simulation of the in vivo digestion products and their activity.
    • β-lactoglobulin as a molecular carrier of linoleate: characterisation and effects on intestinal epithelial cells in vitro

      Le Maux, Solene; Giblin, Linda; Croguennec, Thomas; Bouhallab, Said; Brodkorb, Andre; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Irish Research Council for Science, Engineering and Technology; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 08/RD/TMFRC/650 (American Chemical Society, 27/08/2012)
      The dairy protein β-lactoglobulin (βlg) is known to bind hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids. In the present work, we investigated the biological activity in vitro of linoleate once complexed to bovine βlg. Binding of linoleate (C18:2) to bovine βlg was achieved by heating at 60 °C for 30 min at pH 7.4, resulting in a linoleate/βlg molar binding stoichiometry of 1.1, 2.1, and 3.4. Two types of binding sites were determined by ITC titrations. Binding of linoleate induced the formation of covalent dimers and trimers of βlg. The LD50 on Caco-2 cells after 24 h was 58 μM linoleate. However, cell viability was unaffected when 200 μM linoleate was presented to the Caco-2 cells as part of the βlg complex. The Caco-2 cells did not increase mRNA transcript levels of long chain fatty acid transport genes, FATP4 and FABPpm, or increase levels of the cAMP signal, in response to the presence of 50 μM linoleate alone or as part of the βlg complex. Therefore, it is proposed that βlg can act as a molecular carrier and alter the bioaccessibility of linoleate/linoleic acid.
    • β-Lactoglobulin-linoleate complexes: In vitro digestion and the role of protein in fatty acids uptake

      Le Maux, Solene; Brodkorb, Andre; Croguennec, Thomas; Hennessy, Alan A.; Bouhallab, Said; Giblin, Linda; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Irish Research Council for Science, Engineering and Technology; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 08/RD/TMFRC/650 (Elsevier Inc and American Dairy Science Association, 2013-07)
      The dairy protein β-lactoglobulin (BLG) is known to bind fatty acids such as the salt of the essential longchain fatty acid linoleic acid (cis,cis-9,12-octadecadienoic acid, n-6, 18:2). The aim of the current study was to investigate how bovine BLG-linoleate complexes, of various stoichiometry, affect the enzymatic digestion of BLG and the intracellular transport of linoleate into enterocyte-like monolayers. Duodenal and gastric digestions of the complexes indicated that BLG was hydrolyzed more rapidly when complexed with linoleate. Digested as well as undigested BLG-linoleate complexes reduced intracellular linoleate transport as compared with free linoleate. To investigate whether enteroendocrine cells perceive linoleate differently when part of a complex, the ability of linoleate to increase production or secretion of the enteroendocrine satiety hormone, cholecystokinin, was measured. Cholecystokinin mRNA levels were different when linoleate was presented to the cells alone or as part of a protein complex. In conclusion, understanding interactions between linoleate and BLG could help to formulate foods with targeted fatty acid bioaccessibility and, therefore, aid in the development of food matrices with optimal bioactive efficacy