• Development of enterococci and production of tyramine during the manufacture and ripening of Cheddar cheese

      Rea, Mary; Franz, C.M.A.P.; Holzapfel, W.H.; Cogan, Tim; European Union; CT97-3078 (Teagasc (Agriculture and Food Development Authority), Ireland, 2004)
      The effect of six strains of enterococci (three strains of Enterococcus faecalis, and one strain each of Ec. faecium, Ec. durans and Ec. casseliflavus) on flavour development and tyramine production in Cheddar cheese during manufacture and ripening was studied in two trials. No strain produced gelatinase or haemolysin and all of them grew well during manufacture reaching 107 colony forming units (cfu)/g in 6 h, after which they remained more or less constant during at least 48 weeks of ripening. There was no relationship between tyramine production in a broth containing tyrosine and tyramine production in the cheese. All strains, except Ec. casseliflavus, produced tyramine in the cheese, with the greatest concentration (162 mg/kg) being produced by Ec. durans after 9 months ripening at 8 ºC. There was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) between the flavour of the control cheese and any cheese containing an enterococcus. Nevertheless, cheese made with Ec. faecium E-24 received the best score in each trial at both time points. No off-flavours were found. Regarding proteolysis, only Ec. faecalis E-140 showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in both phosphotungstic acid and pH 4.6 soluble N. It is concluded that enterococci have little effect on the flavour of Cheddar cheese.
    • Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy

      Dalmasso, Marion; Strain, Ronan; Neve, Horst; Franz, C.M.A.P.; Cousin, Fabien J.; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin; Science Foundation Ireland; SFI/12/RC/2273 (PLOS, 09/06/2016)
      With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages) is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) between 10−3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections.