• Evaluation of methods for the reduction of contaminating host reads when performing shotgun metagenomic sequencing of the milk microbiome

      Yap, Min; Feehily, Conor; Walsh, Calum J.; Fenelon, Mark; Murphy, Eileen F.; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M.; van Sinderen, Douwe; O’Toole, Paul W.; O’Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D.; et al. (Springer, 2020-12-10)
      Shotgun metagenomic sequencing is a valuable tool for the taxonomic and functional profiling of microbial communities. However, this approach is challenging in samples, such as milk, where a low microbial abundance, combined with high levels of host DNA, result in inefficient and uneconomical sequencing. Here we evaluate approaches to deplete host DNA or enrich microbial DNA prior to sequencing using three commercially available kits. We compared the percentage of microbial reads obtained from each kit after shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Using bovine and human milk samples, we determined that host depletion with the MolYsis complete5 kit significantly improved microbial sequencing depth compared to other approaches tested. Importantly, no biases were introduced. Additionally, the increased microbial sequencing depth allowed for further characterization of the microbiome through the generation of metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs). Furthermore, with the use of a mock community, we compared three common classifiers and determined that Kraken2 was the optimal classifier for these samples. This evaluation shows that microbiome analysis can be performed on both bovine and human milk samples at a much greater resolution without the need for more expensive deep-sequencing approaches.
    • Exercise and the microbiota

      O'Sullivan, Orla; Cronin, Owen; Clarke, Siobhan F.; Murphy, Eileen F.; Molloy, Micheal G; Shanahan, Fergus; Cotter, Paul D.; Science Foundation Ireland; SFI/12/RC/2273; SFI/12/RC/2273; et al. (Taylor & Francis, 24/03/2015)
      Sedentary lifestyle is linked with poor health, most commonly obesity and associated disorders, the corollary being that exercise offers a preventive strategy. However, the scope of exercise biology extends well beyond energy expenditure and has emerged as a great ‘polypill’, which is safe, reliable and cost-effective not only in disease prevention but also treatment. Biological mechanisms by which exercise influences homeostasis are becoming clearer and involve multi-organ systemic adaptations. Most of the elements of a modern lifestyle influence the indigenous microbiota but few studies have explored the effect of increased physical activity. While dietary responses to exercise obscure the influence of exercise alone on gut microbiota, professional athletes operating at the extremes of performance provide informative data. We assessed the relationship between extreme levels of exercise, associated dietary habits and gut microbiota composition, and discuss potential mechanisms by which exercise may exert a direct or indirect influence on gut microbiota.
    • The gut microbiota and the liver. Pathophysiological and clinical implications

      Quigley, Eamonn M.M.; STANTON, CATHERINE; Murphy, Eileen F. (Elsevier BV, 2012-11-06)
      The term microbiota is used to describe the complete population of microorganisms that populate a certain location, such as the gut, and is preferred to the term flora as the former incorporates not just bacteria but also archaea, viruses, and other microorganisms, such as protozoa. Though the potential role of the microbiota (through such concepts as ‘‘the putrefactive principle associated with faeces’’ and ‘‘intestinal toxins’’) in the pathogenesis of systemic disorders has been recognized since antiquity, a firm scientific basis for a role for the gut microbiome in liver disease did not emerge until the middle of the last century with the recognition of the relationship between hepatic coma and the absorption of nitrogenous substances from the intestine [1]. This was followed by the description of abundant coliforms in the small intestine of cirrhotics [2] and the role of bacteria was clinched by trials demonstrating that antibiotics led to clinical improvement in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) [3]. Subsequently, these same gut-derived bacteria were implicated in another complication of chronic liver disease and portal hypertension, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Most recently, more credence has been given to a suggestion that has lingered in the background for decades, namely, that the gut microbiota might play a role in the pathogenesis or progression of certain liver diseases, including alcoholic liver disease [4], non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH) [5], total parenteral nutrition (TPN)/intestinal failure-related liver disease (IFALD) [6], and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) [7], either through the direct effects of bacteria or their products, via inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor a (TNF), whose release had been triggered by constituents of the microbiota, or, as in the case of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), through cross-reactivity between microbial antigens and human tissue components (e.g., atypical anti-nuclear cytoplasmic antibodies (p-ANCA), in PSC, recognize both tubulin beta isoform 5 in human neutrophils, and the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ) [8]. Indeed, inflammatory mediators have also been implicated in the development and maintenance of the hyperdynamic circulation that is a feature of portal hypertension [9], in impairing liver function and contributing to haemostatic failure [10]. It is in these contexts that modulation of the microbiota has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy in the management of liver disease
    • The gut microbiota and the liver. Pathophysiological and clinical implications

      Quigley, Eamonn M.; STANTON, CATHERINE; Murphy, Eileen F. (Elsevier, 2012-11-23)
      This article reviews the microbiota in the pathogenesis of liver disease and its complications and the therapeutic impact of modulating the microbiota
    • Targeting the Microbiota to Address Diet-Induced Obesity: A Time Dependent Challenge

      Clarke, Siobhan F.; Murphy, Eileen F.; O'Sullivan, Orla; Ross, R Paul; O'Toole, Paul W.; Shanahan, Fergus; Cotter, Paul D.; Science Foundation Ireland; Alimentary Health Ltd (PLOS, 07/06/2013)
      Links between the gut microbiota and host metabolism have provided new perspectives on obesity. We previously showed that the link between the microbiota and fat deposition is age- and time-dependent subject to microbial adaptation to diet over time. We also demonstrated reduced weight gain in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice through manipulation of the gut microbiota with vancomycin or with the bacteriocin-producing probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 (Bac+), with metabolic improvement achieved in DIO mice in receipt of vancomycin. However, two phases of weight gain were observed with effects most marked early in the intervention phase. Here, we compare the gut microbial populations at the early relative to the late stages of intervention using a high throughput sequencing-based analysis to understand the temporal relationship between the gut microbiota and obesity. This reveals several differences in microbiota composition over the intervening period. Vancomycin dramatically altered the gut microbiota composition, relative to controls, at the early stages of intervention after which time some recovery was evident. It was also revealed that Bac+ treatment initially resulted in the presence of significantly higher proportions of Peptococcaceae and significantly lower proportions of Rikenellaceae and Porphyromonadaceae relative to the gut microbiota of L. salivarius UCC118 bacteriocin negative (Bac-) administered controls. These differences were no longer evident at the later time. The results highlight the resilience of the gut microbiota and suggest that interventions may need to be monitored and continually adjusted to ensure sustained modification of the gut microbiota.