• Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bifidobacteria with Potential to Design Natural Biofunctional Health-Promoting Dairy Foods

      Linares, Daniel M.; Gomez, Carolina; Renes, Erica; Fresno, José M.; Tornadijo, María E.; Ross, R Paul; STANTON, CATHERINE; JPI Food Processing for Health; Science Foundation Ireland (Frontiers, 2017-05-18)
      Consumer interest in healthy lifestyle and health-promoting natural products is a major driving force for the increasing global demand of biofunctional dairy foods. A number of commercial sources sell synthetic formulations of bioactive substances for use as dietary supplements. However, the bioactive-enrichment of health-oriented foods by naturally occurring microorganisms during dairy fermentation is in increased demand. While participating in milk fermentation, lactic acid bacteria can be exploited in situ as microbial sources for naturally enriching dairy products with a broad range of bioactive components that may cover different health aspects. Several of these bioactive metabolites are industrially and economically important, as they are claimed to exert diverse health-promoting activities on the consumer, such as anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic, anti-oxidative, immune-modulatory, anti-cholesterolemic, or microbiome modulation. This review aims at discussing the potential of these health-supporting bacteria as starter or adjunct cultures for the elaboration of dairy foods with a broad spectrum of new functional properties and added value.
    • The potential of non-starter lactic acid bacteria from Cheddar cheese to colonise the gut

      Leeuwendaal, N.; STANTON, CATHERINE; O'Toole, P.W.; Beresford, Tom; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Science Foundation Ireland; JPI Food Processing for Health; 2014073 (Elsevier BV, 2021-05-27)
      This study was undertaken to assess the potential of Non-Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria (NSLAB) from Cheddar cheese to survive gastric transit and display probiotic-related traits including bile salt hydrolase activity, the ability to adhere to the gut epithelium and inhibition of enteropathogen binding. Populations of NSLAB, up to 107 CFU/g per cheese were recovered following exposure of cheese to Simulated Stomach Duodenum Passage (SSDP) conditions. A total of 240 isolates were randomly selected from twelve Cheddar cheeses and assessed for probiotic traits. Two strains Lactobacillus paracasei DPC 7150 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus DPC 7102 showed the most probiotic potential. The Lb. paracasei and Lb. rhamnosus strains displayed adhesion rates of 64% and 79%, respectively and inhibited binding of pathogenic Escherichia coli by >20%. This research demonstrates that Cheddar cheese harbours potentially beneficial bacteria, a large portion of which can survive simulated digestion and potentially exhibit health beneficial effects once ingested.