• Draft Genome Sequences of Three Lactobacillus paracasei Strains, Members of the Nonstarter Microbiota of Mature Cheddar Cheese

      Stefanovic, Ewelina; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (American Society for Microbiology, 20/07/2017)
      Lactobacillus paracasei strains are common members of the nonstarter microbiota present in various types of cheeses. The draft genome sequences of three strains isolated from mature cheddar cheeses are reported here.
    • Sequencing of the Cheese Microbiome and Its Relevance to Industry

      Yeluri Jonnala, Bhagya R.; McSweeney, Paul L. H.; Sheehan, Diarmuid (JJ); Cotter, Paul D.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Frontiers, 2018-05-23)
      The microbiota of cheese plays a key role in determining its organoleptic and other physico-chemical properties. It is essential to understand the various contributions, positive or negative, of these microbial components in order to promote the growth of desirable taxa and, thus, characteristics. The recent application of high throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) facilitates an even more accurate identification of these microbes, and their functional properties, and has the potential to reveal those microbes, and associated pathways, responsible for favorable or unfavorable characteristics. This technology also facilitates a detailed analysis of the composition and functional potential of the microbiota of milk, curd, whey, mixed starters, processing environments, and how these contribute to the final cheese microbiota, and associated characteristics. Ultimately, this information can be harnessed by producers to optimize the quality, safety, and commercial value of their products. In this review we highlight a number of key studies in which HTS was employed to study the cheese microbiota, and pay particular attention to those of greatest relevance to industry.
    • Sequencing of the Cheese Microbiome and Its Relevance to Industry

      Yeluri Jonnala, Bhagya R.; McSweeney, Paul L. H.; Sheehan, Diarmuid (JJ); Cotter, Paul D.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Frontiers, 2018-05-23)
      The microbiota of cheese plays a key role in determining its organoleptic and other physico-chemical properties. It is essential to understand the various contributions, positive or negative, of these microbial components in order to promote the growth of desirable taxa and, thus, characteristics. The recent application of high throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) facilitates an even more accurate identification of these microbes, and their functional properties, and has the potential to reveal those microbes, and associated pathways, responsible for favorable or unfavorable characteristics. This technology also facilitates a detailed analysis of the composition and functional potential of the microbiota of milk, curd, whey, mixed starters, processing environments, and how these contribute to the final cheese microbiota, and associated characteristics. Ultimately, this information can be harnessed by producers to optimize the quality, safety, and commercial value of their products. In this review we highlight a number of key studies in which HTS was employed to study the cheese microbiota, and pay particular attention to those of greatest relevance to industry.
    • Symposium review: Structure-function relationships in cheese

      Lamichhane, Prabin; Kelly, Alan L.; Sheehan, Diarmuid (JJ); Dairy Levy Trust; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Ornua; RMIS6259 (Elsevier, 2017-10-18)
      The quality and commercial value of cheese are primarily determined by its physico-chemical properties (e.g., melt, stretch, flow, and color), specific sensory attributes (e.g., flavor, texture, and mouthfeel), usage characteristics (e.g., convenience), and nutritional properties (e.g., nutrient profile, bioavailability, and digestibility). Many of these functionalities are determined by cheese structure, requiring an appropriate understanding of the relationships between structure and functionality to design bespoke functionalities. This review provides an overview of a broad range of functional properties of cheese and how they are influenced by the structural organization of cheese components and their interactions, as well as how they are influenced by environmental factors (e.g., pH and temperature).