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dc.contributor.authorDewhurst, Richard J.*
dc.contributor.authorDelaby, L*
dc.contributor.authorMoloney, Aidan P*
dc.contributor.authorBoland, T.*
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Eva*
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-25T14:26:33Z
dc.date.available2014-07-25T14:26:33Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationR.J. Dewhurst, L. Delaby, A. Moloney, T. Boland and E. Lewis. Nutritive value of forage legumes used for grazing and silage. Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research 48: 167–187, 2009en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0791-6833
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/655
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_GB
dc.description.abstractLegume forages have an important position in ruminant production in Western Europe and with further development can play an even larger role. Red clover for silage and white clover in grazed swards lead to enhanced growth rate and milk yield in comparison with pure grasses. Much of the production benefit of these legumes relates to enhanced intake since digestibilities are not markedly different to grasses. The higher intake of legume silages reflects differences in the cell structure of legume plants which combined with high fermentation rates means that they break down into small particles in the rumen, and leave the rumen more rapidly than perennial ryegrass. Ease of ingestion leads to high rates of intake, which explains higher intakes for grazed legumes. A further benefit of legumes is the reduced rate of decline in digestibility with advancing maturity. Whilst legumes have limited effects on gross milk composition or carcass characteristics, there are marked increases in levels of beneficial n−3 PUFA. Legumes have often led to a reduction in methane production from the rumen and again, this relates to both physical and chemical differences between forage species. The high rates of release of soluble protein and of breakdown to small particles from clovers and lucerne is associated with susceptibility to bloat, which is a limitation to further exploitation in grazing systems. The high concentration of rapidly degraded protein in legumes also leads to inefficient utilisation of dietary N and increased urinary N output. Research with tanniniferous forages, such as birdsfoot trefoil and sulla, demonstrates the potential for future legumes with reduced environmental and health effects, though these particular forage legumes are not well adapted to temperate regions of Western Europe that are the focus of this review.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTeagasc, Oak Park, Carlow, Irelanden_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIrish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research;vol 48
dc.subjectAnimal healthen_GB
dc.subjectFertilityen_GB
dc.subjectForage legumeen_GB
dc.subjectNutrient utilisationen_GB
dc.subjectProduct compositionen_GB
dc.subjectRumen functionen_GB
dc.titleNutritive value of forage legumes used for grazing and silageen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.identifier.rmisMKGS-0254-5893
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-12T08:05:44Z


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