The aim of the Food Chemistry & Technology Department is to help food processors maintain competitive advantage and secure premium markets. Our Dairy research focuses on cheese, infant formula and dairy based ingredients; Meat research, focusing on quality, whole chain management and recovering value from meat processing streams; Cereal research focusing on product quality and innovation in the bakery industry

Recent Submissions

  • Grazing of dairy cows on pasture versus indoor feeding on total mixed ration: Effects on low-moisture part-skim Mozzarella cheese yield and quality characteristics in mid and late lactation

    Gulati, Arunima; Galvin, Norann; Hennessy, Deirdre; McAuliffe, Stephen; O’Donovan, Michael; McManus, Jennifer J.; Fenelon, Mark; Guinee, Timothy P.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; Dairy Levy Trust; 11/sf/309 (Elsevier for American Dairy Science Association, 2018-08-16)
    This study investigated the effects of 3 dairy cow feeding systems on the composition, yield, and biochemical and physical properties of low-moisture part-skim Mozzarella cheese in mid (ML; May–June) and late (LL; October–November) lactation. Sixty spring-calving cows were assigned to 3 herds, each consisting of 20 cows, and balanced on parity, calving date, and pre-experimental milk yield and milk solids yield. Each herd was allocated to 1 of the following feeding systems: grazing on perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) pasture (GRO), grazing on perennial ryegrass and white clover (Trifolium repens L.) pasture (GRC), or housed indoors and offered total mixed ration (TMR). Mozzarella cheese was manufactured on 3 separate occasions in ML and 4 in LL in 2016. Feeding system had significant effects on milk composition, cheese yield, the elemental composition of cheese, cheese color (green to red and blue to yellow color coordinates), the extent of flow on heating, and the fluidity of the melted cheese. Compared with TMR milk, GRO and GRC milks had higher concentrations of protein and casein and lower concentrations of I, Cu, and Se, higher cheese-yielding capacity, and produced cheese with lower concentrations of the trace elements I, Cu, and Se and higher yellowness value. Cheese from GRO milk had higher heat-induced flow and fluidity than cheese from TMR milk. These effects were observed over the entire lactation period (ML + LL), but varied somewhat in ML and LL. Feeding system had little, or no, effect on gross composition of the cheese, the proportions of milk protein or fat lost to cheese whey, the texture of the unheated cheese, or the energy required to extend the molten cheese. The differences in color and melt characteristics of cheeses obtained from milks with the different feeding systems may provide a basis for creating points of differentiation suited to different markets.
  • Sequencing of the Cheese Microbiome and Its Relevance to Industry

    Yeluri Jonnala, Bhagya. R.; McSweeney, Paul L. H.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.; Cotter, Paul D.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Frontiers, 2018-05-23)
    The microbiota of cheese plays a key role in determining its organoleptic and other physico-chemical properties. It is essential to understand the various contributions, positive or negative, of these microbial components in order to promote the growth of desirable taxa and, thus, characteristics. The recent application of high throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) facilitates an even more accurate identification of these microbes, and their functional properties, and has the potential to reveal those microbes, and associated pathways, responsible for favorable or unfavorable characteristics. This technology also facilitates a detailed analysis of the composition and functional potential of the microbiota of milk, curd, whey, mixed starters, processing environments, and how these contribute to the final cheese microbiota, and associated characteristics. Ultimately, this information can be harnessed by producers to optimize the quality, safety, and commercial value of their products. In this review we highlight a number of key studies in which HTS was employed to study the cheese microbiota, and pay particular attention to those of greatest relevance to industry.
  • Structural mechanism and kinetics of in vitro gastric digestion are affected by process-induced changes in bovine milk

    Mulet-Cabero, Ana Isabel; Mackie, Alan R.; Wilde, Peter J.; Fenelon, Mark A.; Brodkorb, Andre; Irish Dairy Levy Research Trust; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; BBSRC; 2014029; BB/J004545/1 (Elsevier, 2018-03-20)
    Bovine milk is commonly exposed to processing, which can alter the structure, biochemical composition, physico-chemical properties and sensory quality. While many of these changes have been studied extensively, little is known about their effect on digestive behaviour. In this study, heat treatments of pasteurisation at 72 °C for 15 s or Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) treatment at 140 °C for 3 s and homogenisation at pilot-plant scale were applied to whole milk. The gastric behaviour was investigated using a recently developed semi-dynamic adult in vitro model. The emptied digesta were analysed to assess the nutrient delivery kinetics, changes in microstructure and protein digestion. All samples showed protein aggregation and coagulum formation within the first 15 min of gastric digestion at which time the pH ranged from 5.5 to 6. Homogenised samples creamed regardless of heat treatment, whereas all non-homogenised samples exhibited sedimentation. The consistency of the coagulum of the heated samples was more fragmented compared to those of the non-heated samples. Rheological analysis showed that the higher the temperature of the heat treatment, the softer the obtained coagulum and the higher the protein hydrolysis at the end of digestion. The study also confirmed that gastric emptying of caseins from milk is delayed due to coagulation in the stomach, while β-lactoglobulin was emptied throughout the gastric phase, except for UHT-treated milk. The gastric behaviour also had an impact on the lipid and protein content of the emptied chyme. The homogenised samples seemed to release more nutrients at the end of gastric digestion.
  • Optimisation of plant protein and transglutaminase content in novel beef restructured steaks for older adults by central composite design

    Baugreet, Sephora; Kerry, Joseph P.; Brodkorb, Andre; Gomez, Carolina; Auty, Mark A.; Allen, Paul; Hamill, Ruth M; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 11/F/045 (Elsevier, 2018-03-29)
    With the goal of optimising a protein-enriched restructured beef steak targeted at the nutritional and chemosensory requirements of older adults, technological performance of thirty formulations, containing plant-based ingredients, pea protein isolate (PPI), rice protein (RP) and lentil flour (LF) with transglutaminase (TG) to enhance binding of meat pieces, were analysed. Maximal protein content of 28% in cooked product was achieved with PPI, RP and LF. Binding strength was primarily affected by TG, while textural parameters were improved with LF inclusion. Optimal formulation (F) to obtain a protein-enriched steak with lowest hardness values was achieved with TG (2%), PPI (8%), RP (9.35%) and LF (4%). F, F1S (optimal formulation 1 with added seasoning) and control restructured products (not containing plant proteins or seasonings) were scored by 120 consumers' aged over-65 years. Controls were most preferred (P < .05), while F1S were least liked by the older consumers. Consumer testing suggests further refinement and optimisation of restructured products with plant proteins should be undertaken.
  • Covalent labelling of β-casein and its effect on the microstructure and physico-chemical properties of emulsions stabilized by β-casein and whey protein isolate

    Li, Meng; Auty, Mark A.; O'Mahony, James A.; Kelly, Alan L.; Brodkorb, Andre; Irish Dairy Levy Research Trust; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Elsevier, 2016-12)
    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of covalent labelling on the physico-chemical properties of β-casein (β-CN) in solution and in emulsions stabilized by β-CN and whey protein isolate (WPI). β-CN was covalently labelled by 5-(and 6)-carboxytetramethylrhodamine, succinimidyl ester (NHS-Rhodamine). The effect of conjugating β-CN with NHS-Rhodamine on the spectroscopic properties of labelled β-CN (β-CNlabelled) was examined. No significant difference in interfacial tension (p > 0.05) was found between mixture of WPI and β-CNlabelled (0.5% w/w WPI/β-CNlabelled) and of WPI and β-CN (0.5% w/w WPI/β-CN) in 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) at 20 °C. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with either WPI/β-CN or WPI/β-CNlabelled (0.5% w/w) were also investigated using laser-light scattering, analytical centrifugation, rheometry and CLSM. It was shown that labelling had no significant effect on the physico-chemical properties of emulsions (p > 0.05) in terms of droplet size, creaming stability, viscosity or zeta-potential. Confocal micrographs of emulsions made with WPI/β-CNlabelled showed that both β-CN and whey proteins could be observed simultaneously, and were co-localized at the surface of fat globules. Furthermore, it was found through image analysis that β-CN produced a thicker interfacial layer than WPI.
  • Integrated phenotypic-genotypic approach to understand the influence of ultrasound on metabolic response of Lactobacillus sakei

    Ojha, K. Shikha; Burgess, Catherine; Duffy, Geraldine; Kerry, Joseph P.; Tiwari, Brijesh; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (PLOS, 2018-01-25)
    The lethal effects of soundwaves on a range of microorganisms have been known for almost a century whereas, the use of ultrasound to promote or control their activity is much more recent. Moreover, the fundamental molecular mechanism influencing the behaviour of microorganisms subjected to ultrasonic waves is not well established. In this study, we investigated the influence of ultrasonic frequencies of 20, 45, 130 and 950 kHz on growth kinetics of Lactobacillus sakei. A significant increase in the growth rate of L. sakei was observed following ultrasound treatment at 20 kHz despite the treatment yielding a significant reduction of ca. 3 log cfu/mL in cells count. Scanning electron microscopy showed that ultrasound caused significant changes on the cell surface of L. sakei culture with the formation of pores “sonoporation”. Phenotypic microarrays showed that all ultrasound treated L. sakei after exposure to various carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur sources had significant variations in nutrient utilisation. Integration of this phenotypic data with the genome of L. sakei revealed that various metabolic pathways were being influenced by the ultrasound treatments. Results presented in this study showed that the physiological response of L. sakei in response to US is frequency dependent and that it can influence metabolic pathways. Hence, ultrasound treatments can be employed to modulate microbial activity for specialised applications.
  • Marine Functional Foods Research Initiative (NutraMara)

    Troy, Declan; Tiwari, Brijesh; Hayes, Maria; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Johnson, Mark; Stengel, Dagmar; O'Doherty, John V.; Fitzgerald, Richard J.; McSorley, Emeir; Kerry, Joseph; Marine Institute; MFFRI/07/01 (Marine Institute, 2017-12)
    The NutraMara – Marine Functional Foods Research Initiative was conceived by Sea Change - A Marine Knowledge, Research and Innovation Strategy for Ireland 2007-2013. The goal was to develop a collaborative funding mechanism that would create new research capacity and build the capabilities required to maximise the potential of Ireland’s extensive marine bioresources. By supporting a strong interdisciplinary research team, capable of exploring marine animals and plants as a sustainable source of materials for use as functional ingredients and foods, the vision for NutraMara was to position Ireland to the fore in use of marine bioresources as health beneficial ingredients. Commencing in 2008 and supported by funds of €5.2 million from the Marine Institute and the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, the research programme was led by Teagasc as the head of a multi-institutional consortium. The NutraMara consortium comprises marine bioresources and bioscience expertise, with food science and technology expertise from University College Cork; University College Dublin; the National University of Ireland Galway; the University of Limerick and Ulster University. Research effort was directed towards exploring Ireland’s marine bioresources – including macro- and microalgae, finfish and shellfish from wild and cultured sources: and discards from processing fish as sources of novel ingredients with bioactive characteristics. This discovery activity involved the collection of over 600 samples from 39 species of algae and fish and the analysis of 5,800 extracts, which resulted in 3,000 positive “hits” for bioactivity. The NutraMara consortium has built a strong research capacity to identify, characterise and evaluate marine-origin bioactives for use as/in functional foods. It further built the capacity to develop model foods enhanced with these marine-origin functional ingredients; providing insights to the processing challenges associated with producing functional ingredients from marine organisms. The consortium was actively engaged in research activities designed to identify and assess bioactive compounds from available marine resources, including polyphenols, proteins/peptides, amino acids, polysaccharides, polyunsaturated fatty acids and materials with antioxidant, probiotic or prebiotic properties. A key component of NutraMara’s activities was the development of human capital. The recruitment of M.Sc. and PhD students and their integration within a dynamic research environment that has strong links to industry, provided lasting expertise and capabilities, which are relevant to the needs of Ireland’s food and marine sectors. NutraMara research led to the awarding of eighteen PhDs and recruitment of 21 post-doctoral researchers over the eight year research programme. In excess of 80 peer reviewed publications resulted from this research and more publications are planned. A further 100 posters and conference presentations were also delivered by NutraMara researchers and Principal Investigators. The development and implementation of training and exchange programmes aimed at providing early stage researchers with inter-disciplinary skills that are critical to their development as researchers, enhanced the research capacity of institutions, the industry sectors and the country as a whole. Principal Investigators involved in leading the NutraMara research programme have secured additional research grants of almost €6 million from national and international sources and are engaged in extensive research collaboration involving marine and food research expertise; an activity which did not exist prior to NutraMara. The dissemination of knowledge and transfer of research results to industry were key activities in the research programme. The research outputs and visibility of NutraMara activity nationally resulted in 10 companies engaging in research and development activity with the consortium. Regular workshops and conferences organised by NutraMara attracted close to five hundred participants from Ireland and overseas. Members of the NutraMara core PI group have contributed to the formulation of new national foods and marine research policy and national research agenda, both during the national prioritisation exercise and in sectoral research strategies. This final project report describes the process by which research targets were identified, and the results of extensive screening and evaluation of compounds extracted from marine bioresources. It also highlights the development of new protocols designed to extract compounds in ways that are food friendly. Evaluating the functional properties, bioactivity and bioavailability of high potential marine compounds involved in vitro and in vivo testing. Pilot animal and human intervention studies yielded further insight to the potential and challenges in developing marine functional ingredients. As a result of work completed within the NutraMara consortium, Ireland is well positioned to continue to contribute to the development of ingredients derived from marine organisms and in doing so support the on-going development of Ireland’s food sector.
  • Stabilising effect of α-lactalbumin on concentrated infant milk formula emulsions heat treated pre- or post-homogenisation

    Buggy, Aoife K.; McManus, Jenifer J.; Brodkorb, Andre; McCarthy, Noel; Fenelon, Mark A. (Springer, 22/11/2016)
    Protein type and/or heat treatment pre- or post-homogenisation can affect the physical stability of infant formulations during manufacture. Previous research has described the use of α-lactalbumin addition in infant formulae, but has not demonstrated the effect of heating pre- or post-emulsion formulation during processing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of both of these parameters. Three batches of model 1st-stage infant formula containing differing whey protein ratios (60:40 whey: casein with α-lactalbumin content 12, 30 or 48% of total protein) were prepared. Each batch was split; one half receiving heat treatment pre-homogenisation and the second half homogenised and then heat treated. Emulsion stability was determined by size exclusion chromatography, SDS-PAGE, particle size and viscosity measurements. There was a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in the formation of large soluble aggregates upon increasing α-lac concentration in emulsions heat treated either before or after homogenisation. Heat treatment of formulations post-homogenisation resulted in a higher (P < 0.05) D.v09 within the particle size distribution; increasing α-lactalbumin concentration to 30 or 48% significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the D.v09 within the particle size distribution in these emulsions. The viscosity of concentrates (55 % total solids) containing the 12% α-lactalbumin, heat treated post-homogenisation, was significantly greater (P < 0.05) than the equivalent emulsion heat treated pre-homogenisation; increasing the α-lactalbumin concentration to 30 or 48% significantly (P < 0.05) reduced viscosity. When the α-lactalbumin content was increased to 48% as a percentage of the total protein, heating before or after emulsion formation had no effect on concentrate viscosity. The findings demonstrate the importance of thermal denaturation/aggregation of whey proteins (and in particular, the ratio of α-lactalbumin to β-lactoglobulin) prior to homogenisation of infant formula emulsions.
  • Simulated gastrointestinal digestion of nisin and interaction between nisin and bile

    Gough, Ronan; O'Connor, Paula M.; Rea, Mary C.; Gomez-Sal, Beatriz; Miao, Song; Hill, Colin; Brodkorb, Andre (Elsevier, 14/08/2017)
    Nisin, an antimicrobial peptide showing activity against many Gram positive bacteria, is widely used as a food preservative. The simulated gastrointestinal digestion of nisin (variant A) was studied using the in vitro INFOGEST digestion method. Following oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion, there was no intact nisin in the system and the nisin was primarily digested by pancreatin. After digestion, six nisin fragments (1–11, 1–12, 1–20, 1–21, 1–29 and 1–32) were identified by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy and four of these nisin fragments (1–20, 1–21, 1–29 and 1–32) demonstrated low antibacterial activity against Lactococcus lactis HP in agar diffusion activity assays. Additionally, it was observed that bile salts form a complex with nisin. This was examined by atomic force microscopy, turbidity and dynamic light scattering, which showed that this interaction resulted in significantly larger bile salt micelles. The presence of bile salts at physiological levels significantly altered the relative amounts of the nisin fragments 1–12, 1–20 and 1–29 produced during an in vitro digestion. This study highlights the importance of including bile in simulated digestions of antimicrobial peptides in order to obtain a more accurate simulation of the in vivo digestion products and their activity.
  • Isolation and characterisation of κ-casein/whey protein particles from heated milk protein concentrate and role of κ-casein in whey protein aggregation

    Gaspard, Sophie J.; Auty, Mark A.E.; Kelly, Alan L.; O'Mahony, James A.; Brodkorb, Andre; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Dairy Levy Research Trust; 2012211 (Elsevier, 12/06/2017)
    Milk protein concentrate (79% protein) reconstituted at 13.5% (w/v) protein was heated (90 °C, 25 min, pH 7.2) with or without added calcium chloride. After fractionation of the casein and whey protein aggregates by fast protein liquid chromatography, the heat stability (90 °C, up to 1 h) of the fractions (0.25%, w/v, protein) was assessed. The heat-induced aggregates were composed of whey protein and casein, in whey protein:casein ratios ranging from 1:0.5 to 1:9. The heat stability was positively correlated with the casein concentration in the samples. The samples containing the highest proportion of caseins were the most heat-stable, and close to 100% (w/w) of the aggregates were recovered post-heat treatment in the supernatant of such samples (centrifugation for 30 min at 10,000 × g). κ-Casein appeared to act as a chaperone controlling the aggregation of whey proteins, and this effect was stronger in the presence of αS- and β-casein.
  • A Simple Method for the Purification of Nisin

    Gough, Ronan; Gomez-Sala, Beatriz; O'Connor, Paula M.; Rea, Mary C.; Miao, Song; Hill, Colin; Brodkorb, Andre (Springer, 29/05/2017)
    Nisin, an antimicrobial peptide showing activity against a broad range of Gram-positive bacteria, is widely used as a food preservative and has potential as a therapeutic for a range of infectious diseases. Here, we present a simple purification method, based on a salting-out approach, which can produce a powder containing ∼33% nisin, from a nisin-producing culture in a whey permeate-based medium. This process removes over 99% of the lactic acid, NaCl, lactose and non-nisin proteins from the cell-free culture supernatant. The approach can also enrich a commonly used commercial nisin preparation over 30-fold to a purity of ∼58%. These are higher purities than comparable published methods. The simplicity of this approach facilitates its use in research and also its scale-up.
  • Future Protein Supply and Demand: Strategies and Factors Influencing a Sustainable Equilibrium

    Henchion, Maeve; Hayes, Maria; Mullen, Anne Maria; Fenelon, Mark; Tiwari, Brijesh; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; 11/F/043 (MDPI, 20/07/2017)
    A growing global population, combined with factors such as changing socio-demographics, will place increased pressure on the world’s resources to provide not only more but also different types of food. Increased demand for animal-based protein in particular is expected to have a negative environmental impact, generating greenhouse gas emissions, requiring more water and more land. Addressing this “perfect storm” will necessitate more sustainable production of existing sources of protein as well as alternative sources for direct human consumption. This paper outlines some potential demand scenarios and provides an overview of selected existing and novel protein sources in terms of their potential to sustainably deliver protein for the future, considering drivers and challenges relating to nutritional, environmental, and technological and market/consumer domains. It concludes that different factors influence the potential of existing and novel sources. Existing protein sources are primarily hindered by their negative environmental impacts with some concerns around health. However, they offer social and economic benefits, and have a high level of consumer acceptance. Furthermore, recent research emphasizes the role of livestock as part of the solution to greenhouse gas emissions, and indicates that animal-based protein has an important role as part of a sustainable diet and as a contributor to food security. Novel proteins require the development of new value chains, and attention to issues such as production costs, food safety, scalability and consumer acceptance. Furthermore, positive environmental impacts cannot be assumed with novel protein sources and care must be taken to ensure that comparisons between novel and existing protein sources are valid. Greater alignment of political forces, and the involvement of wider stakeholders in a governance role, as well as development/commercialization role, is required to address both sources of protein and ensure food security.
  • Effect of pulse flours on the physiochemical characteristics and sensory acceptance of baked crackers

    Millar, Kim A.; Barry-Ryan, Catherine; Burke, Roisin; Hussey, Karen; McCarthy, Sinead; Gallagher, Eimear; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme (Wiley, 29/03/2017)
    Pulse flours offer nutritional alternatives to wheat flour in the production of baked snacks due to their high protein and fibre levels and low glycaemic index. In this study, broad-bean (Vicia faba), yellow-pea and green-pea (Pisum sativum) flours were each blended with wheat flour at 40% in the formulation of chemically leavened crackers. The effects of flour type and baking time on the physiochemical properties, sensory acceptability, nutritional composition and antioxidant activity of the crackers were observed in comparison with 100% wheat crackers. Broad-bean crackers had the highest protein content and antioxidant activity (13 g per 100 g DM and 38.8 mgAAE per 100 g DM, respectively). Yellow-pea crackers had the highest fibre content (12 g per 100 g DM). Physical dimensions and colour attributes were significantly affected by pulse-flour substitution. Yellow-pea and broad-bean crackers were significantly preferred by consumers compared to the control, demonstrating the potential application of these flours to improve the eating quality and nutritional profile of crackers.
  • Selective enrichment of dairy phospholipids in a buttermilk substrate through investigation of enzymatic hydrolysis of milk proteins in conjunction with ultrafiltration

    Barry, Kate M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Kelly, Philip M.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 10RD/TMFRC/709 (Elsevier, 04/02/2017)
    Extensive enzymatic hydrolysis of milk proteins in reconstituted buttermilk powder was combined with ultrafiltration to generate a phospholipid (PL) enriched fraction with maximum permeation of hydrolysed peptides. Buttermilk, naturally high in PLs, is the ideal substrate for enrichment of these bio- and techno-functionally active compounds. A 7.8 fold increase in PL was achieved in the 50 kDa retentate; 6.16 ± 0.02% total PL compared with 0.79 ± 0.01% in the starting substrate, an increase considerably greater than previously reported. Total lipid content (% dry matter) increased 6.3 fold in the retentate, 43.43 ± 0.61%, from the starting substrate, 6.84 ± 0.17%. This combined strategic approach enabled maximum enrichment of PLs with no transmission of lipid material into the permeate, 0.09 ± 0.02% total lipid, and non-detectable levels of PLs recovered in the permeate, 0.00 ± 0.01% total PL.
  • Alternative uses for co-products: Harnessing the potential of valuable compounds from meat processing chains

    Mullen, Anne Maria; Alvarez Garcia, Carlos; Zeugolis, Dimitrios; Henchion, Maeve; O'Neill, Eileen; Drummond, Liana; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; 11/F/043 (Elsevier, 03/05/2017)
    Opportunities for exploiting the inherent value of protein-rich meat processing co-products, in the context of increased global demand for protein and for sustainable processing systems, are discussed. While direct consumption maybe the most profitable route for some, this approach is influenced greatly by local and cultural traditions. A more profitable and sustainable approach may be found in recognizing this readily available and under-utilised resource can provide high value components, such as proteins, with targeted high value functionality of relevance to a variety of sectors. Applications in food & beverages, petfood biomedical and nutrition arenas are discussed. Utilization of the raw material in its entirety is a necessary underlying principle in this approach to help maintain minimum waste generation. Understanding consumer attitudes to these products, in particular when used in food or beverage systems, is critical in optimizing commercialization strategies.
  • Dairy food structures influence the rates of nutrient digestion through different in vitro gastric behaviour

    Mulet-Cabero, Ana-Isabel; Rigby, Neil M.; Brodkorb, Andre; Mackie, Alan (Elsevier, 31/12/2016)
    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vitro the extent to which specific food structures alter gastric behaviour and could therefore impact on nutrient delivery and digestion in the small intestine. Results obtained from a specifically developed gastric digestion model, were compared to results from a previous human study on the same foods. The semi-dynamic model could simulate the main gastric dynamics including gradual acidification, lipolysis, proteolysis and emptying. Two dairy-based foods with the same caloric content but different structure were studied. The semi-solid meal comprised a mixture of cheese and yogurt and the liquid meal was an oil in water emulsion stabilised by milk proteins. Our findings showed similar gastric behaviour to that seen previously in vivo. Gastric behaviour was affected by the initial structure with creaming and sedimentation observed in the case of liquid and semi-solid samples, respectively. Lipid and protein digestion profiles showed clear differences in the amount of nutrients reaching the simulated small intestine and, consequently, the likely bioaccessibility after digestion. The semi-solid sample generated higher nutrient released into the small intestine at an early stage of digestion whereas nutrient accessibility from liquid sample was delayed due to the formation of a cream layer in the gastric phase. This shows the strong effect of the matrix on gastric behaviour, proteolysis and lipolysis, which explains the differences in physiological responses seen previously with these systems in terms of fullness and satiety.
  • Survival characteristics of monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium 4,[5],12:i:- strains derived from pig feed ingredients and compound feed

    Burns, Ann Marie; Duffy, Geraldine; Walsh, Des; Tiwari, Brijish K.; Grant, Jim; Lawlor, Peadar G; Gardiner, Gillian E.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 2011010 (Elsevier, 2015-12-09)
    The presence of Salmonella in animal feed or feed ingredients at the feed mill or on-farm is a cause for concern, as it can be transmitted to food-producing animals and subsequently to humans. The objective of this study was to determine the survival characteristics of five feed ingredient- and feed-derived monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium 4,[5],12:i:- strains. The first part of the study investigated thermal inactivation using an immersed heating coil apparatus. A Weibull model provided a good fit, with low RMSE values (0.04–0.43) and high R2 values (0.93–0.99) obtained. There was considerable inter-strain variation in heat resistance, with D-values ranging from 397.83 to 689 s at 55 °C, 11.35–260.95 s at 60 °C and 1.12 to 6.81 at 65 °C. Likewise, z-values ranged from 2.95 to 5.44 °C. One strain demonstrated a significantly higher thermal tolerance, even though it had been isolated from a meal feed. However, overall the strains investigated do not appear to be that much more heat resistant than Salmonella previously studied. The second part of this study involved assessing the ability of the five Salmonella strains to survive during storage over a 28-day period in pelleted weaner pig feed treated with 0.3% sodium butyrate. While a mean reduction in the Salmonella count of 0.79 log10 CFU was seen in the treated feed during the storage period, a reduction (albeit only 0.49 log10 CFU) was also observed in the control feed. Although there was no overall effect of treatment, sodium butyrate resulted in reductions in Salmonella counts of 0.75 and 0.22 log10 CFU at days 14 and 24 of feed storage, respectively but at the end of the 28-day storage period counts were 0.25 log10 CFU higher in the treated feed. Therefore, the sodium butyrate used appears unsuitable as an agent for feed treatment perhaps due to the protective coating on the particular feed additive used. Overall, the results of this study enhance knowledge about the behaviour and survival characteristics of monophasic S. Typhimurium 4,[5],12:i:- strains in animal feed and may assist the feed industry and pig producers in implementing effective intervention strategies for their control.
  • Detection and characterisation of Complement protein activity in bovine milk by bactericidal sequestration assay

    Maye, Susan; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Kelly, Philip M.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Cambridge University Press for the Institute of Food Research and the Hannah Research Institute, 29/06/2015)
    While the Complement protein system in human milk is well characterised, there is little information on its presence and activity in bovine milk. Complement forms part of the innate immune system, hence the importance of its contribution during milk ingestion to the overall defences of the neonate. A bactericidal sequestration assay, featuring a Complement sensitive strain, Escherichia coli 0111, originally used to characterise Complement activity in human milk was successfully applied to freshly drawn bovine milk samples, thus, providing an opportunity to compare Complement activities in both human and bovine milks. Although not identical in response, the levels of Complement activity in bovine milk were found to be closely comparable with that of human milk. Differential counts of Esch. coli 0111 after 2 h incubation were 6·20 and 6·06 log CFU/ml, for raw bovine and human milks, respectively – the lower value representing a stronger Complement response. Exposing bovine milk to a range of thermal treatments e.g. 42, 45, 65, 72, 85 or 95 °C for 10 min, progressively inhibited Complement activity by increasing temperature, thus confirming the heat labile nature of this immune protein system. Low level Complement activity was found, however, in 65 and 72 °C heat treated samples and in retailed pasteurised milk which highlights the outer limit to which high temperature, short time (HTST) industrial thermal processes should be applied if retention of activity is a priority. Concentration of Complement in the fat phase was evident following cream separation, and this was also reflected in the further loss of activity recorded in low fat variants of retailed pasteurised milk. Laboratory-based churning of the cream during simulated buttermaking generated an aqueous (buttermilk) phase with higher levels of Complement activity than the fat phase, thus pointing to a likely association with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) layer.
  • Second Generation GM Foods: Perspectives on Likely Future Acceptance by Irish Consumers

    O'Connor, Elaine; Cowan, Cathal; Williams, Gwilym; O'Connell, John; Boland, Maurice; Downey, Gerard (Teagasc, 01/07/2005)
    Two hypothetical second-generation genetically-modified (GM) products, a yogurt and a dairy spread, were evaluated by consumers. Second-generation GM food products offer specific consumer benefits - in the case of this study, health benefits.
  • Developing Sous Vide/Freezing Systems for Ready-Meal omponents

    Tansey, Fergal; Gormley, Ronan T.; Carbonell, Serge; Oliveira, Jorge; Bourke, Paula; O’Beirne, David (Teagasc, 01/04/2005)
    Sous vide cooking involves sealing raw or par-cooked food in a vacuumised laminated plastic pouch or container, cooking by controlled heating, rapid chilling and then re-heating for consumption. The chilled storage period is up to 21 days at 0 to 3oC. The recommended thermal process for sous vide products is 90oC for 10min or its time-temperature equivalent. Concerns about the safety of sous vide products, mainly due to the potential for temperature abuse in the chill chain, has prevented the widespread use of this technology. The role of the current project, therefore, was to investigate sous vide cooking followed by freezing, as a safe alternative to sous vide/chilling for 10 ready-meal components i.e. carbohydrates (potatoes, pasta, rice), vegetables (carrots, broccoli) and muscle foods (salmon, cod, chicken, beef and lamb).

View more