• Contamination of Beef Carcasses during Hide Removal and use of a Test Bacterial Decontamination System on Beef Hide

      McEvoy, John M.; Doherty, Alice M.; Sheridan, James J.; McGuire, Liam (Teagasc, 2000-12)
      In Ireland, the Abattoirs Act, 1988 (Veterinary Examination) (Amendment), 1998 (S.I. No. 6, 1998) empowers the ante mortem veterinary inspector to reject animals for slaughter or require slaughter under special conditions, based on the level of visible hide contamination. Special conditions for slaughter include reduced line speed, increased space between animals and increased use of workstation hygiene facilities. Since their introduction in Ireland, cattle regulations have become more stringent and at present, both category 4 and 5 animals are rejected. However, a procedure for shaving accumulated hardened faeces (faecal clods) from category 4 and 5 animals has been introduced into most abattoirs, enabling them to reach the cleanliness standard. The potential risk of pathogens surviving in faecal clods on the hide of animals at slaughter is not known. This study examined: 1. The relationship between livestock cleanliness categories and the amount of contamination on the resultant carcasses. 2. The difference in bacterial contamination on carcasses from category 4 animals dressed without increased use of workstation hygiene facilities and those dressed with increased use of hygiene facilities. 3. The survival of E. coli O157:H7 in faecal clods
    • Development of a critical control step for E.coli 0157:H7 in pepperoni

      Duffy, Geraldine; Riordan, Denise C.; Sheridan, James J.; US-Ireland Co-operation Programme in Agriculture Science and Technology (Teagasc, 1999-10)
      Verocytotoxin producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) and particularly strains of serogroup O157, have emerged as food poisoning pathogens which can cause a severe and potentially fatal illness. The symptoms of VTEC infection include haemorrhagic colitis with bloody diarrhoea and severe abdominal pain. The infection may lead to renal failure as a result of haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Because of the severity of the illness and the low infectious dose, this pathogen is classed as a serious food safety issue. It is recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture that the production process for ready to eat foods such as fermented meats (pepperoni, salami etc.) should be capable of addressing a worst case scenario ie. the production process should be able to yield a log105.0cfu /g (105 cfu/g) reduction in numbers of E. coli O157:H7 on the raw meat. The aim of this study was to develop an industrially viable critical control step(s) which could be implemented into the pepperoni production process.