• Effects of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) generated plasma on microbial reduction and quality parameters of fresh mackerel (Scomber scombrus) fillets

      Albertos, Irene; Martín-Diana, AnaBelen; Cullen, P.J.; Tiwari, Brijesh; Ojha, S. K.; Bourke, Paula; Álvarez, Carlos; Rico, Daniel; National Institute for Food and Agricultural Research (Elsevier, 2017-07-04)
      The effect of atmospheric cold plasma generated by a novel in-package dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) on microbial and quality parameters of mackerel fillets was investigated. DBD voltage (70 kV and 80 kV) and treatment time (1, 3 and 5 min) were studied. Within 24 h of DBD treatment, spoilage bacteria (total aerobic psychrotrophic, Pseudomonas and lactic acid bacteria) were significantly reduced. However, significant effects on lipid oxidation parameters (PV, Dienes) were observed for the treated samples. Both studied treatment factors, treatment voltage and time, significantly affected anti-microbial efficacy and lipid oxidation. Nevertheless, no changes in pH or colour (except for L*) were observed. These results suggest atmospheric cold plasma generated by DBD could be implemented as technology for fish processing, retaining product quality over its shelf life. However, further investigations are needed in order to implement this technology and to control and mitigate its limitations, mainly associated to increased oxidation.
    • Principles and mechanisms of ultraviolet light emitting diode technology for food industry applications

      Hinds, Laura M.; O'Donnell, Colm P.; Akhter, Mahbub; Tiwari, Brijesh; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 14/F/845 (Elsevier, 2019-04-13)
      The application of ultraviolet (UV) light to water, food contact surfaces and medical equipment for microbial inactivation is widely employed. To date, UV disinfection sources employed are primarily low-pressure and medium-pressure mercury lamps; emitting monochromatic and polychromatic light, respectively. Despite the widespread use of mercury lamps, there are multiple drawbacks associated with their use including; high energy consumption, large size which limits reactor design, high heat emission and the presence of mercury. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have potential for use as a highly efficient UV decontamination technology. Recent advances in semiconductor development have resulted in UV-LEDs becoming more widely available. UV-LEDs emit monochromatic light, which enables customised UV-LED disinfection systems at specific wavelengths to be developed. The application of UV-LEDs for disinfection purposes has been studied in recent years, particularly with respect to water disinfections systems. In this review, studies relating to UV-LED food applications are discussed. Furthermore, the chemical changes induced in foods, as a result of UV treatment, together with advantages and limitations of the technology are outlined.