• Comparison of antioxidant activities of bovine whey proteins before and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion

      Corrochano, Alberto R.; Sariçay, Yunus; Arranz, Elena; Kelly, Philip M.; Buckin, Vitaly; Giblin, Linda; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 13 F 354-WheyGSH (Elsevier, 2018-10-24)
      Oxidative stress caused by free radicals has been implicated in several human disorders. Dietary antioxidants can help the body to counteract those reactive species and reduce oxidative stress. Antioxidant activity is one of the multiple health-promoting attributes assigned to bovine whey products. The present study investigated whether this activity was retained during upper gut transit using a static simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion (SGID) model. The capacity to scavenge free radicals and reduce ferric ion of whey protein isolate (WPI), individual whey proteins, and hydrolysates pre- and post-SGID were measured and compared using various antioxidant assays. In addition, the free AA released from individual protein fractions in physiological gut conditions were characterized. Our results indicated that the antioxidant activity of WPI after exposure to the harsh conditions of the upper gut significantly increased compared with intact WPI. From an antioxidant bioactivity viewpoint, this exposure negates the need for prior hydrolysis of WPI. The whey protein α-lactalbumin showed the highest antioxidant properties post-SGID (oxygen radical absorbance capacity = 1,825.94 ± 50.21 μmol of Trolox equivalents/g of powder) of the 4 major whey proteins tested with the release of the highest amount of the antioxidant AA tryptophan, 6.955 μmol of tryptophan/g of protein. Therefore, α-lactalbumin should be the preferred whey protein in food formulations to boost antioxidant defenses.
    • Impact of ultrasound and blanching on functional properties of hot-air dried and freeze dried onions

      Ren, F.; Perussello, C. A.; Zhang, Z.; Kerry, Joseph P.; Tiwari, Brijesh; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; FIRM 450 06/TNI/AFRC6 (Elsevier, 2017-08-22)
      The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasonic treatment and blanching prior to hot-air drying and freeze drying of onions on the retention of bioactive compounds (total phenolics, total flavonoids, and quercetin). Onion slices were treated either with ultrasound at 20 kHz and different amplitude levels (24.4–61 μm) for 1, 3 and 5 min or with blanching using hot water at 70 °C for 1, 3 and 5 min. The ultrasound treatment improved the retention of bioactive compounds (especially quercetin) and accordingly the antioxidant activity in onion slices dried either by freeze drying or hot-air drying. This is ascribed to the destruction of the original tissue structure by ultrasound and thus higher extraction ability of the studied phytochemicals. Comparing ultrasound treated samples, freeze dried onions had a higher retention of bioactive compounds than hot-air dried ones. Blanched and ultrasound treated dried onions exhibited similar colour change. Therefore, ultrasound treatment is a potential alternative to conventional blanching before drying of onion slices.
    • Invited review: Whey proteins as antioxidants and promoters of cellular antioxidant pathways

      Corrochano, Alberto R.; Buckin, Vitaly; Kelly, Philip M.; Giblin, Linda; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; 13 F 454-WheyGSH (Elsevier, 2018-03-28)
      Oxidative stress contributes to cell injury and aggravates several chronic diseases. Dietary antioxidants help the body to fight against free radicals and, therefore, avoid or reduce oxidative stress. Recently, proteins from milk whey liquid have been described as antioxidants. This review summarizes the evidence that whey products exhibit radical scavenging activity and reducing power. It examines the processing and treatment attempts to increase the antioxidant bioactivity and identifies 1 enzyme, subtilisin, which consistently produces the most potent whey fractions. The review compares whey from different milk sources and puts whey proteins in the context of other known food antioxidants. However, for efficacy, the antioxidant activity of whey proteins must not only survive processing, but also upper gut transit and arrival in the bloodstream, if whey products are to promote antioxidant levels in target organs. Studies reveal that direct cell exposure to whey samples increases intracellular antioxidants such as glutathione. However, the physiological relevance of these in vitro assays is questionable, and evidence is conflicting from dietary intervention trials, with both rats and humans, that whey products can boost cellular antioxidant biomarkers.