Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorGiblin, Linda
dc.contributor.authorMcSweeney, Paul L. H.
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, Jeremiah J
dc.contributor.authorCotter, Paul D.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-27T11:38:12Z
dc.date.available2015-05-27T11:38:12Z
dc.date.issued21/01/2013
dc.identifier.citationO'Sullivan DJ, Giblin L, McSweeney PLH, Sheehan JJ and Cotter PD (2013) Nucleic acid-based approaches to investigate microbial-related cheese quality defects. Front. Microbio. 4:1. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2013.00001en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/800
dc.descriptionpeer-revieweden_GB
dc.description.abstractThe microbial profile of cheese is a primary determinant of cheese quality. Microorganisms can contribute to aroma and taste defects, form biogenic amines, cause gas and secondary fermentation defects, and can contribute to cheese pinking and mineral deposition issues. These defects may be as a result of seasonality and the variability in the composition of the milk supplied, variations in cheese processing parameters, as well as the nature and number of the non-starter microorganisms which come from the milk or other environmental sources. Such defects can be responsible for production and product recall costs and thus represent a significant economic burden for the dairy industry worldwide. Traditional non-molecular approaches are often considered biased and have inherently slow turnaround times. Molecular techniques can provide early and rapid detection of defects that result from the presence of specific spoilage microbes and, ultimately, assist in enhancing cheese quality and reducing costs. Here we review the DNA-based methods that are available to detect/quantify spoilage bacteria, and relevant metabolic pathways in cheeses and, in the process, highlight how these strategies can be employed to improve cheese quality and reduce the associated economic burden on cheese processors.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine under the Food Institutional Research Measure. Daniel J. O’Sullivan is in receipt of a Teagasc Walsh Fellowship, Grant Number:2012205.
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers in Microbiology;vol 4
dc.subjectMolecular methodsen_GB
dc.subjectCheese quality defectsen_GB
dc.subjectMicrobial defectsen_GB
dc.titleNucleic acid-based approaches to investigate microbial-related cheese quality defectsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.identifier.rmisMDDT-0102-6288
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2013.00001
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Agriculture, Food and the Marine
dc.contributor.sponsorTeagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber2012205
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-12T08:25:37Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
fmicb-04-00001 O'Sullivan etal.pdf
Size:
671.9Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record