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dc.contributor.authorPrendergast, Deirdre M.*
dc.contributor.authorDuggan, Sharon J.*
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Geraldine*
dc.contributor.editorDowney, Gerard
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-03T15:57:17Z
dc.date.available2015-09-03T15:57:17Z
dc.date.issued01/10/2009
dc.identifier.citationDowney, G., Prendergast, D.M., Duggan, S.J., Duffy, G., Tracking of Salmonella through the Pork Slaughter Process, 102, Teagasc, 2009.en_GB
dc.identifier.isbn1-84170-554-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/839
dc.descriptionEnd of project reporten_GB
dc.description.abstractTo help address the problem of salmonellosis in the Republic of Ireland (RoI), a national Salmonella control programme was introduced in 1997 with a view to reducing the prevalence of Salmonella in pigs on the farm and on pig carcasses. The primary objective of this present study was to determine the correlation between the Salmonella serological and bacteriological status of pigs presented for slaughter and the Salmonella status of pork cuts following slaughter, dressing and chilling. Two additional studies investigated the prevalence and numbers of Salmonella spp. in the boning halls of four commercial pork abattoirs and at retail level in butcher shops and supermarkets in the RoI. The results indicated that categorisation of pig herds on the basis of a historical serological test for Salmonella was not a good predictor of the bacteriological Salmonella status of individual pigs at time of slaughter. However, it is acknowledged that serological testing does help in giving a rough estimate of the overall Salmonella status of a pig herd. There was a linear correlation between prevalence of Salmonella in caecal contents and on pork cuts at factory level; therefore, if the number of herds presented for slaughter with high levels of Salmonella (category 3) was reduced, there would be less potential for contamination of the lairage, equipment etc. and so less likelihood of Salmonella contamination on pork. The impact of crosscontamination during transport, lairage, processing and distribution cannot be ignored and measures to diminish this would significantly reduce the dissemination of Salmonella in the chain and the consequent risk posed. A key finding was the considerable variation in the incidence of Salmonella on different sampling days and in different slaughter plants.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Development Plan 2007-2013en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTeagascen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAshtown Food Research Centre Research Report;102
dc.subjectPorken_GB
dc.subjectSalmonellaen_GB
dc.subjectPigsen_GB
dc.subjectCross-contaminationen_GB
dc.titleTracking of Salmonella through the Pork Slaughter Processen_GB
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_GB
dc.identifier.rmis5426
dc.contributor.sponsorSafefood
dc.contributor.sponsorNational Development Plan 2007-2013
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-12T08:25:25Z


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