• Current trends in sample preparation for growth promoter and veterinary drug residue analysis

      Kinsella, Brian; O'Mahony, John; Malone, Edward; Moloney, Mary; Cantwell, Helen; Furey, A.; Danaher, Martin; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; 06RDTAFRC479; 07FHRITAFRC5 (Elsevier, 09/09/2009)
      A comprehensive review is presented on the current trends in sample preparation for isolation of veterinary drugs and growth promotors from foods. The objective of the review is to firstly give an overview of the sample preparation techniques that are applied in field. The review will focus on new techniques and technologies, which improve efficiency and coverage of residues. The underlying theme to the paper is the developments that have been made in multi-residue methods and particularly multi-class methods for residues of licensed animal health products, which have been developed in the last couple of years. The role of multi-class methods is discussed and how they can be accommodated in future residue surveillance.
    • A dual validation approach to detect anthelmintic residues in bovine liver over an extended concentration range

      Kinsella, Brian; Whelan, Michelle; Cantwell, Helen; McCormack, Martin; Furey, A.; Lehotay, Stephen J.; Danaher, Martin; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland; European Union; 06RDTAAFRC479; et al. (Elsevier, 21/08/2010)
      This paper describes a method for the detection and quantification of 38 residues of the most widely used anthelmintics (including 26 veterinary drugs belonging to the benzimidazole, macrocyclic lactone and flukicide classes) in bovine liver using two different protocols for MRL and non-MRL levels. A dual validation approach was adopted to reliably quantify anthelmintic residues over an extended concentration range (1–3000 gkg−1). Sample extraction and purification was carried out using a modified QuEChERS method. A concentration step was included when analysing in the low gkg−1 range. Rapid analysis was carried out by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS/MS), which was capable of detecting residues to <2 gkg−1. The method has been single-laboratory validated according to the 2002/657/EC guidelines and met acceptability criteria in all but a few cases. The inclusion of 19 internal standards, including 14 isotopically labelled internal standards, improved accuracy, precision, decision limit (CC˛) and detection capability (CCˇ).
    • Food residue database

      O'Keeffe, Michael; Kennedy, Orla; Farrell, Frank; Nolan, Marie-Louise; Dooley, Martin; Byrne, Patrick; Nugent, Audrey; Cantwell, Helen; Horne, Elizabeth; Nelson, Victor; et al. (Teagasc, 2001-11)
      The Food Residue Database contains a broad range of residue studies in foods of animal origin for the period 1995 to 2000, covering veterinary drugs, pesticides and contaminants. In most cases, such as antiparasitic drugs, beta-agonists, pesticides, dioxins, mycotoxins, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the picture for Irish dairy, meat and fish products is good with residue levels being low or non-measurable. In a few cases, such as ivermectin in farmed salmon and tetracycline residues in pork, improvements in the situation were observed with subsequent studies. Antimicrobial residues, in general, are not a problem but levels above MRL values have been found indicating the need for good practice in use of veterinary medicines. A problem with elevated nitrate levels in dairy powders may be resolved by the industry through observance of good manufacturing practices. Summary Reports on all the studies carried out for the Food Residue Database are available to food companies and other interested parties.