• Acrylamide formation in potato products

      Brunton, Nigel; Gormley, Ronan T.; Butler, Francis; Cummins, Enda; Danaher, Martin; O'Keeffe, Michael (Teagasc, 2006-08)
      Acrylamide, a substance classified as a potential carcinogen, occurs in heated starchy foods at concentrations many times in excess of levels permitted in drinking water. Early surveys indicated that levels of acrylamide in potato products such as French fries and potato crisps were the highest of the foodstuffs investigated. The present project addressed this issue by determining levels of acrylamide precursors (asparagine and reducing sugars) in raw potatoes and levels of acrylamide in (i) potato products from different storage regimes, (ii) spot-sampled potatoes purchased from a local supermarket, (iii) samples that received pre-treatments and were fried at different temperatures and (iv) French fries reheated in different ovens.A risk assessment of the estimated acrylamide intake from potato products for various cohorts of the Irish population was also conducted.
    • Food residue database

      O'Keeffe, Michael; Kennedy, Orla; Farrell, Frank; Nolan, Marie-Louise; Dooley, Martin; Byrne, Patrick; Nugent, Audrey; Cantwell, Helen; Horne, Elizabeth; Nelson, Victor; et al. (Teagasc, 2001-11)
      The Food Residue Database contains a broad range of residue studies in foods of animal origin for the period 1995 to 2000, covering veterinary drugs, pesticides and contaminants. In most cases, such as antiparasitic drugs, beta-agonists, pesticides, dioxins, mycotoxins, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the picture for Irish dairy, meat and fish products is good with residue levels being low or non-measurable. In a few cases, such as ivermectin in farmed salmon and tetracycline residues in pork, improvements in the situation were observed with subsequent studies. Antimicrobial residues, in general, are not a problem but levels above MRL values have been found indicating the need for good practice in use of veterinary medicines. A problem with elevated nitrate levels in dairy powders may be resolved by the industry through observance of good manufacturing practices. Summary Reports on all the studies carried out for the Food Residue Database are available to food companies and other interested parties.
    • Methods for antibiotic residues in food

      O'Keeffe, Mandy J.; Walshe, Michaela; Horne, Elizabeth; O'Keeffe, Michael; Foran, Shane; Lardner, Caroline; Daly, Tracy; Kane, Marian (Teagasc, 2001-04)
      A comprehensive capability to test for residues of veterinary drugs is an important support for the Irish food industry. There is a requirement for food manufacturers to demonstrate the compliance of their products with stringent customer specifications. In addition, legislative requirements are becoming more exacting both in terms of the range of substances covered and the lower residue levels to which test systems must measure.
    • Methods for veterinary drug residue analysis in food

      O'Keeffe, Michael (Teagasc, 1999-02)
      A comprehensive capability to test for residues of veterinary drugs is an important support for the Irish food industry. There is a requirement for food manufacturers to demonstrate the compliance of their products with stringent customer specifications. In addition, legislative requirements are becoming more exacting both in terms of the range of substances covered and the lower residue levels to which test systems must measure.
    • Nitrofurans : measuring tissue-bound residues in meat

      O'Keeffe, Michael; Connolly, Anne; Nugent, Audrey (Teagasc, 2006-08)
      The aims of this project were to (a) develop a range of screening and confirmatory test methods that might be applied to effectively test for the illicit use of the prohibited nitrofuran antimicrobials, (b) study the persistence of nitrofuran antimicrobials as bound metabolite residues in edible tissues and (c) undertake a pan-European survey of the incidence of nitrofurans in retail pork.
    • Production of pork with improved nutritional and eating quality

      O'Keeffe, Michael; Eskola, Mart; Nugent, Audrey; Fitzpatrick, Jane; European Union (Teagasc, 2007-06)
      The SUSPORKQUAL project – sustainability in the production of pork with improved nutritional and eating quality using strategic feeding in outdoor production – was designed to address issues relating to pig performance, environmental effects, meat quality, meat safety, animal welfare, nutritional quality of products, and marketability of pork from sustainable outdoor pig production systems. The project handled these issues through seven workpackages involving 11 research groups from seven European countries.
    • Protein-bound veterinary drug residues in food

      O'Keeffe, Michael; Horne, Elizabeth; Cadogan, Aodhmar; Coyle, Tiernan; European Union; AIR2-CT93-0860 (Teagasc, 1999-03)
      Bound residues of veterinary drugs have been recognised as an important aspect of food safety particularly (a) where such residues may persist for long periods after withdrawal of the drug treatment and (b) where the bound residues may be released, during digestion of edible tissues, in biologically active forms. Residues bound to proteins are not extractable by the conventional solvent extraction procedures for residue determination. Procedures for the release of bound residues from proteins, identification of their chemical structure, and determination of the amount of bound residues in edible tissues are required.
    • Rapid control systems for veterinary drug residues in food producing animals

      O'Keeffe, Michael; European Union; SMT4 - CT96 - 2092 (Teagasc, 2002-10)
      The aim was to develop rapid systems which could be used to test for the presence of veterinary drug residues in food producing animals. Body fluid samples are most suitable for rapid testing systems so as to avoid the lengthy residue extraction procedures required for tissue samples. Urine was analysed for sulphamethazine, a licensed antimicrobial, and for chlorotestosterone, a prohibited growth promoting agent, as models to demonstrate the different approaches.
    • Supercritical fluid extraction of veterinary drug residues from meat

      O'Keeffe, Mandy J.; O'Keeffe, Michael; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland (Teagasc, 1999-10)
      Extraction is a key step in the analysis of food samples for residues of veterinary drugs. Over the last ten years there has been increasing interest in alternatives to the use of organic solvents for sample extraction. The development of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for the determination of residues in meat provides alternative methods, which may be automated and which have attractive properties such as avoidance of organic solvents and increased speed of extraction. This project is a jointly-funded United States Department of Agriculture and Department of Agriculture and Food activity with the objective of developing robust SFE procedures suitable for the quantitative recovery of ß-agonists (illegal growth promoters) from animal tissue. Fundamental aspects of SFE in its application to residue analysis are also addressed.