• Assessment and Control of Foodborne Pathogens in Ireland

      Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin; Murphy, P.; Jordan, Kieran; Arendt, Elke; van Sinderen, Douwe; Morgan, S.M.; Hickey, Rita M.; Maher, M.J.; Kelly, J.; et al. (Teagasc, 2001-05-01)
      Consumers are increasingly demanding food that is free from pathogens, but with less preservatives and additives. As a response to these conflicting demands, current trends in the food industry include minimal processing, and the investigation of alternative inhibitors for use in foods. Additionally, the manufacture of an increasing range of novel foods, and the inclusion of non-dairy ingredients into dairy products, and vice versa, poses additional dangers with respect to safety. Furthermore, the dramatic increase in incidence of food-borne illness internationally, as a result of contamination with food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, is a cause of considerable consumer concern. Bacteriocins are inhibitory peptides produced by a number of Lactic Acid Bacteria which are capable of killing other bacteria. These natural inhibitors have widespread applications in the preservation of foods, since they can kill a number of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. The broad spectrum bacteriocin Lacticin 3147 (discovered in a previous project and patented - see DPRC No. 3) is produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DPC3147, a food-grade strain, similar to strains used for commercial cheese manufacture. Lacticin 3147 is effective in the inhibition of all Gram positive bacteria tested including the food pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and food spoilage bacteria such as Clostridia and Bacillus species. As part of this project the bacteriocin Lacticin 3147 was assessed as a food preservative for improving food safety via inhibition of pathogenic organisms. Thus the project plan followed a "twin-track" approach to assessing and controlling the food safety aspects of Irish food. The first of these was designed to investigate the current safety status of Irish dairy products. The second approach involved an attempt to exploit natural antimicrobial substances, including Lacticin 3147, to protect foods from pathogenic bacteria.
    • Dairy Ingredients for the Baking Industry.

      Keogh, M.K.; Neville, Denis P.; STANTON, CATHERINE; Auty, Mark; Kennedy, R.; Arendt, Elke (Teagasc, 2001-08-01)
      Shortenings (baking fats), microencapsulated using dairy ingredients and milk protein hydrolysates, were produced for testing in a variety of baked products. The powders were evaluated for their functionality as powdered baking fats, as potential replacers of synthetic emulsifiers, as ingredients capable of improving baking performance or as potential health-enhancing ingredients. These studies provide the technology for the dairy industry to enter the specialised food ingredients sector with a siftable, non-greasy, free-flowing powdered fat for the baking industry.
    • Improving the quality of gluten-free products

      Gallagher, Eimear; McCarthy, Denise; Gormley, Ronan T.; Arendt, Elke (Teagasc, 2004-03)
      The incidence of coeliac disease or other allergic reactions/intolerances to gluten is increasing, largely due to improved diagnostic procedures and changes in eating habits. The worldwide number of sufferers of coeliac disease has been predicted to increase by a factor of ten over the next number of years, resulting in a growing market for gluten-free cereal-based products. Market research has shown that many of the products currently on sale are of inferior quality. The replacement of gluten presents a major technological challenge, as it is an essential structure-building protein which is necessary for formulating high quality cereal-based goods. Therefore, the production of high quality gluten-free bread is difficult.